Click for JetForums Click for Nordhavn Click for Westport List Your Boat Click for Walker

1968 41' Roamer Undergoing Restoration

Discussion in 'Chris Craft Roamer Yacht' started by Fransdream, Feb 12, 2014.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. Fransdream

    Fransdream New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Whortonsville, NC
    We purchased the much talked about Alex Bay steel hull Roamer that was in beautiful condition cosmetically. We expected to cruise her down the Hudson and waterway back to NC until we found out that her steel bottom was SWISS cheese.
    She has been hauled back to NC where her bottom has been carefully removed, ready for sandblasting and replating. My husband is going to attempt to replate her with 3/16" sheets of 8' x 40' steel so there are no seams. You see, we had a 1965 - 36' Roamer that we piece mealed back together and it didn't hold up well in our brackish water.
    We're looking for information regarding products that will help smooth out the hull after being replated as was done originally from the factory.
    If any of you have had to replace a steel bottom, you know that once sanded down there is a red barrier coat (something of a concrete product) that had been used to smooth out any dents and imperfections of the hull prior to painting originally by the factory.
    We need to know of a product that CANNOT absorb water and can be used over zinc primer prior to painting her.
    Many of you have read Homer's posts and perhaps have used Awlfil/Red and Awlgrip epoxy. We need to know if that is absolutely what he used or if there is any other product out there. Or, do you know what product ChrisCraft used and where we could get that from.
    Any help and suggestions would be appreciated.
    Thank you for your help!
    Fransdream
  2. bolsado

    bolsado Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Fairing

    Homer is referencing fairing compound

    Its mostly used on upper hull sides for cosmetic purposes

    The interlux paint website has excellent info on hull painting prep

    Its useful in general even if you dont use their products
  3. bolsado

    bolsado Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Sacramento
    The website is yacht paint dot com
  4. bolsado

    bolsado Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Sacramento
    I cant speak to steel as i have AL

    There was no fairing compound on the bottom of mine only paint
  5. bolsado

    bolsado Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Sacramento
    In simple terms its marine grade bondo

    You can see different brands at west marine and jamestown distributors

    I used a combination of fiberglass filler and interlux watertite

    I found i could by the fiberglass filler cheaply at auto parts stores over marine suppliers. I used the fiberglass in 3 rough coats its tough to get smooth and needs lots of sanding

    I used the watertite as final smoothing coat and for areas with curves ie at the bumper strip chrome moulding and chrome moulding area below toe rail

    I am 90% sure most are 3M products rebranded

    My suggestion would be to not fair the bottom but do good paint prep and good bottom paint maintenance

    Use your normal haulouts to inspect and redo paint as needed

    Its cheaper to haul and repaint than fair 40 foot of bottom hull

    Considering most of the compound will be sanded off anyway
  6. homer1958

    homer1958 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    494
    Location:
    Annapolis MD
    ooops

    I saw that boat and thought it looked very nice for the money. I sort of feel bad about the steel bottom part but that I would not have known that. EVERYONE, ANYONE buying a metal boat should have it scoped for thickness.

    As far as what Chris Craft used, I would not use that when there are products like Interlux 2000 epoxy for fill. Also Burger uses SeaHawk which is great product, not cheap. I used it after sandblasting and it works great done right. Then swear by Petitt paints over Interlux for metal bottoms. Sure, every two years you will see a little pock mark starting... grind it out, put in some Interlux 200, paint.... still easier than dealing with fiberglass that sucks up water and blisters and is not as durable as metal taken well care of ... simple as that. Drive savers and PSS shaft seals will protect your Roamer. Keep the water out... keep your big "zinc" hanging overboard, one on your swim ladder, one on each rudder, two on each shaft and go to sleep after testing with the solver meter. You do not need Capac unless you like to buy batteries. Use a Charles Isolation Transformer, KVA.... no chance for dirty power hitting your hull from shoreline ground issues.

    Epoxy bottom (immediately after blasting) keep the inside of the hull dry and hang a big zinc, aluminum or magnesium overboard ground to the hull. Zinc for salt water, Aluminum for brackish and Magnesium for fresh... FACT.

    Test hull with Silver tip from West Marine... .95 or so is great for aluminum. Steel is the strongest, it is heavy and rides a bit more plowlike, perhaps better in rough water. Aluminum is very strong, more flexible and scoots across the water.

    I am sorry to hear of your bottom, but this is not uncommon is steel hulls, it is not so common in aluminum and also why the aluminum ones command a much bigger dollar. Nothing wrong with a good steel hull.... like anything else depends on how it was cared for. And, many people do not take good care of things in my view. Cheaper to take care of expensive things then let them rot and lose your investment. Roamers that were taken care of will outlive us all and your son too.
  7. homer1958

    homer1958 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    494
    Location:
    Annapolis MD
    SeaHawk

    Yup, not much fairing compound on bottom... most went where the trim tabs meet the hull. Make darn sure those screws are replaced to that hold the tabs into the hull.

    SeaHawk bottom epoxy is probably the best or close enough.
  8. Fransdream

    Fransdream New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Whortonsville, NC
    41' Roamer from Alex Bay

    OOOOOPS!!!!!!! Actually is an understatement, once again, totally our fault. Any newbies buying your first steel boat, please learn from our stupid mistake.
    AFTER buying this boat, even though my husband had done some preliminary checking of the bottom prior to purchase and we knew we had some "patchwork" to do prior to having her sandblasted before bringing her home what we found was duct tape and paint and holes!!!!! Someone spent some serious time trying to hide our bad case of swiss cheese bottom. I know we still got a good deal on a great boat, but buyers beware! You must be very careful!
    Once I figure out how to put pictures on here I will put on a couple of how she looked when we bought her and what she looks like now. It's pretty awful but that's what's necessary when you have a bottom as bad as this one. No point at doing a partial job when you have to completely gut everything anyway, right?:eek:
  9. Fransdream

    Fransdream New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Whortonsville, NC
    41' Roamer from Alex Bay

    Homer we wanted to thank you for your much appreciated information that you're willing to share.
    We may be back with more questions from you and any other Roamer members as we continue along our journey putting Island Roamer back together.
    Thanks again!
  10. glashole

    glashole New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    trenton ontario
    I am suprised this was not caught in the marine survey
    :(
  11. homer1958

    homer1958 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    494
    Location:
    Annapolis MD
    Because...

    I think the boat looked so nice they assumed. I think they do not have a survey. Never do this on any boat... wood, steel, aluminum or glass... they all have their issues. I do believe that marine grade aluminum has the best odds... BUT, I saw a 70 Burger RUINED from electrolysis and a Roamer too.

    If you meter your hull, have epoxy bottom, hang the right sacrificial anode, use drive savers, PSS shaft seals and an Isolation transformer... I can't see how it is possible. Just meter the hull... that is easy to see if there is bad electric around.
  12. bolsado

    bolsado Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Fairing compound cont

    For pics and details of my fairing at the waterline you can search my post on al transom

    I would be interested in pics of other restorers efforts on subject

    Right now going in with new engines merc 357 mags and hurth 63 down angle trannies
  13. homer1958

    homer1958 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    494
    Location:
    Annapolis MD
    Fast

    If props are right.... 35 mph low, 36 mph high with that set-up!
    My Yanmar 370's hit 36.5 when first in, but added weight now 35 is tops but she is geared 2.4 to one with heavy shafts... nice part is that she does not dog or slow no matter how much weight of how big the swells are... if anything a bit over-geared... but that is fine.... bulldozerville.
  14. bolsado

    bolsado Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Location:
    Sacramento
    q240z fairing post

    I forgot about the awsome job being done on a 46 footer by q240z. I refound his activity surfing the otherday but his posts here in the Roamer forum are more in depth.

    Qouting from his post here is steps he followed including fairing the bottom. As expected pretty penny to do so but u then have a a top of the line effort. Maybe on Roamer number two in my future I do my best to match this level of quality. No "boatamalans" for me though as even beer wont budge my friends into work.


    q240z

    "Also, for what it's worth, the following is the schedule I've adhered to for this boat.

    1) Sandblast to near white metal except where original fairing compound is in good condition.
    2) Alumaprep & Alodine to all exposed aluminum (possibly not necessary with appropriate "tooth" on the aluminum, but who wants to take a chance?)
    3) Three coats of Devoe 236 Bar Rust epoxy primer from the keel to a foot or so above the waterline.
    4) For underwater filler work, I recommend Interlux VC Watertight Epoxy Fairing Compound over Devoe 236. When applied within a few days after the last coat of 236, you get a fine chemical bond between the two epoxy products. The theory being that Devoe 236 flows much deeper into the pores of the metal than a paste filler can, yielding the best mechanical bond from aluminum to epoxy. Then, you have the outstanding epoxy-epoxy chemical bond from primer to Interlux filler.
    5) For above the waterline, I recommend LBI vinylester fairing compound in the 5-gallon pail. I was using 3M Premium Marine Vinylester, but one gallon of 3m is $88 wholesale and 5 gallons of BLI is $168 retail. They look the same, they smell the same, they spread the same, and they're both vinylester.
    6) Decks get the same treatment as below the waterline--Devoe 236 primer then Interlux VC filler.
    7) Finally, the whole thing will get three more coats of Devoe 236."

    Attached Files: