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Review: Christensen Yachts 160' "ODESSA"

Discussion in 'Christensen Yacht' started by YachtForums, Dec 10, 2009.

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  1. Along Odessa’s wide aisles, both port and starboard, next leads to her elegant, separate Formal Dining room, seating twelve. Forward (to the right in this pic), a set of three sliding doors reveal Odessa's fine dinner ware, with the third door giving the option to close-off the main foyer for privacy.
  2. Odessa’s onshore dockwise entry is centered, at starboard. Her wide foyer features perfectly matched veneers and woods, all stained in splendid brown shades, matching the hues of flooring, cabinets, and staircase. Original artworks stand at ready display. Security cameras monitor all areas, networked through Creston A/V control center; Sony Networks w/zoom; Cameras onboard via Creston system monitor every angle and view; coordinated so each camera cues to zoom in on every picture.
  3. Conveniently located just off the main entryway, her simple Dayhead is nevertheless stylishly designed, in portoro stone, sporting a large vanity mirror and ultra-modern fixtures.
  4. Following her rich black/white, silver and antique tawny brown granite theme, her deluxe Galley features Sub-Zero refrigeration/icemakers/wine storage. Cooking gear includes a Wolf oven, grill and cooktop with a Miele convection oven and Glo-Ray food warmer. A pair of Bosch dishwashers make double duty of clean-up. Complete professional-grade equipment all around for the happy chef.
  5. Here also in Odessa’s Master’s office, featuring original artworks, decor is restrained, with a studied use of color, fabrics; semi-formalized seating arrangements. The plan, as elsewhere, follows the same exacting, slide-rule positioning of each element.
  6. Comfortable, rich, but not gaudy, the Master Stateroom is dominated by a king-size berth and a giant flat-screen TV. At center on the Main Deck, forward, full beam, it boasts the size of a prominent, up-scale apartment. Shown here, a view towards the adjacent sitting room, with day sofa.
  7. The Master from her opposite beam, viewing toward the owner’s individual private desk and its ultimate view of the horizon, for contemplating worldwide business decisions.
  8. Glorying in its soothing lime green Esmerelda Quartzite, top to bottom, her spacious Master’s Bath features a large, raised bathtub, plus his and hers sinks and perimeter lit mirror. Cool in contrast to the earth-tones found throughout the rest of the yacht, the marble floor is kept warm with a subsurface heating element. To port, a separate shower is marbleized right down to an infinity floor drain with a built-in gas shock to aid in lifting the marble floor for drain cleaning. It's the details that make the difference in professional yacht building!
  9. Below, on the after-hours deck, Odessa shows grand spaciousness for her guests: ten – four doubles and a twin – in separate and well-designed, nicely appointed staterooms. Seen here, Odessa’s Main VIP Stateroom, a full-beam singular cabin larger than other guest cabins.
  10. The ensuite bath boasts a large, glass-enclosed shower as well as a white onyx bathtub and individual head. As an example of the finish found in Christensen's marble work, notice the reflection of the back lit mirror against the opposing marble wall in the background.
  11. Odessa’s Guest passengers also get a stylish welcome and a good night’s sleep in this queen-size berth. Modern design again takes over here, plus modernist lighting and bedside cabinets. The color scheme is slightly altered here for a degree of difference. Count three of these Guest double staterooms.
  12. Not skimping on room, the Guest accommodations sport walk-around space, with minimalist styled, deep-drawer dressers and a large mirror which hides a flat screen television; plus extra chairs for seating.
  13. Her Guest baths also present a minimal, but modern approach with full size drawers for storage, set beneath a fashionable frame-lit mirror. Notice the sink and countertop that seem to emulate wood, but in fact it's granite from Christensen's new in-house marble shop. Same with the shower wall and floors. Pictures offer no justice; the work is stunning.
  14. Christensen’s designers have not left out consideration for the hard toiling crew, the important members who keep things ship-shape as well. Though their sleeping quarters are long forward, they make up as bunk beds top and bottom, with separate clothes/gear lockers, and private heads/showers. Shown here is the crew mess and recreation quarters; nicely arranged, decorated equivalent to the ship’s balance.
  15. The lazarette is a kaleidoscope of reflections from high-polish stainless and mirrored walls. At first glance, it's a little disorienting, but engineers see the brilliance in easy to clean surfaces that will never show wear. Engine room monitoring equipment is located inside the lazarette, flanking the watertight door to keep heat in its place while running diagnostics.
  16. Down below, Odessa’s cutting-edge engine duo – 2 x MTU 12V 4000 Series 1800 hp each (Continuous Duty Rated) – are set up to deliver18 knots at maximum cruise. With fuel capacity of 14,074 usg, she boasts a range of 4,000 nm; fuel burning at cruising speed 30 gal./hour. Her Quantum QC1800 “Zero Speed” stabilizers help to assure a steady ride. With draft a mere 7.75’ Odessa easily threads her way through sometimes challenging Bahama and Carib waters; delivering passengers ashore via her 23’ Chris Craft Catalina. She also carries a 15’ Nautica wide body, 12’9” Vanguard Lazer sailboat, and a pair of SeaDoo XP jet skis.
  17. Odessa, Christensen’s latest pride and joy, is a genuine innovative triumph for the
    company; certain to foster bigger and better introductions to international clientele;
    fomenting a super entree into Monaco and European yacht shows. ​


    <end>

    by Capt. Chuck Gnaegy and YF Publisher Carl Camper​


    Specifications:

    LOA: 160’
    Beam: 29.5’
    Draft: 7.75’
    Displacement: 835,000 lbs.
    Fuel: 14,300 USG
    Water: 3,600 USG
    Max. Speed: 18 knots
    Cruise Range: 4,000 nm
    Class: ABS Maltese Cross A1 AMS, CMA Unlimited Cruising

    Machinery:

    Engines: 2 x 1,800 hp MTU 12V4000 Series
    Gears: ZF Model 4650-A
    Props: VEEM 5-Balde
    Stabilizers: Quantum QC-1800 "Zero-Speed"
    Windlass: 2 x Maxwell SY-22, electric
    Thrusters: Ocean Yacht Systems
    Passarelle: Sanguinetto Hydraulic
    Cranes: Steelhead Marine
    Watermakers: Village Marine
    Sanitation: FAST Systems
    Shorepower: Hyak; seamless transfer
    Monitoring: Hyak - SIMnet
    HVAC: CruiseAir
    Fire Control: Marioff Mist System

    Navigation & Communication:

    SATcom: KVH Inmarsat Broadband TracPhone
    VSAT: SeaTel 4006
    Network: Great Circle System
    Charting: Nobeltec
    Radar: Furuno X/S Band with ARPA
    GPS: Northstar
    AIS: SAAB R4 DGPS
    Autopilot: Simrad AP50
    Gyrocompass: SIMRAD GC80
    EchoSounder: (1) B&G; (1) Furuno FCV1200BB

    Design & Engineering:

    Construction: Vacuum Infused Composite
    Naval Architect: Christensen Shipyards, Ltd.
    Exterior Stylist: Christensen Shipyards, Ltd.
    Interior Design: Christensen / Owner's Rep
    Interior Furnishings: Armani Casa
    Paint: Awlgrip


    For more information contact:

    Christensen Shipyards Ltd.
    4400 SE Columbia Way
    Vancouver, Washington 98661
    (360) 695-3238
    www.christensenyachts.com

    ***​
  18. DETAILS
    Photos: Tom Serio

    Lighting: Odessa has full-length underwater lights for picturesque effects during dusk and night-time hours; she’ll be the envy of yacht owners in every port. Here, the "Black Pearl" of Bloody Bay bleeds blue...
  19. Hydrodynamics: The bulb on Christensen's new Custom Series is the result of extensive tank testing at the Webb Institute that increased overall hull efficiency. The bulb's design is quite unique, but the principle behind it; is not. In essence, it's a inverted semi-symmetrical wing shape that creates a higher negative pressure area above the bulb, drawing water lower along the waterline at the bow, substantially canceling the bow wave. Unlike typical round bulbs, this design is more elliptical with a flat section on top that helps reduce pitch and heave.
  20. Hull: Christensen uses full length, solid fiberglass keels. It not only provides protection to the running gear in the shallows, it also serves as a spine providing longitudinal support to the entire hull. How much support? Here's Odessa, supported at 2-points, with nothing in between, on her way to the splash well.
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