Click for Nordhavn Click for Lurssen Click for United Click for Northern Lights Click for Horizon

USS John S. McCain - Collision in Singapore

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by olderboater, Aug 20, 2017.

  1. LuvYachting

    LuvYachting New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Lauderdale
    Those poor sailors had bad Sushi. You know what I mean.:)
  2. d_meister

    d_meister Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    121
    Location:
    San Diego, CA.
    A point of interest: US Navy warships cruise in and out of San Diego Bay outside my window day in and day out. Most often (I think!), they are broadcasting AIS. The ship in the channel now is identified as "US Warship". I think that sometimes ships are identified by name, if I remember correctly. I'll pay closer attention from now on.
    In any event, the Military almost certainly has the capability to turn off AIS broadcasts without affecting reception, which makes sense to do in certain foreign waters. Were I in charge, I would add the ability to spoof a ship ID at sub Class B wattage. Hmmmm, maybe they can do that.
  3. bernd1972

    bernd1972 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    238
    Location:
    Flensburg, Germany
    Certainly they can recognize Class B vessels by AIS. Even I can identify Class B vessels and switch of my transpoder. And I donĀ“t even have a US warship. :D Just a boat with a common cheap class B transponder.
    What on earth do you think?!? Of corse you need someone to look at the screen occasionly...
  4. d_meister

    d_meister Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    121
    Location:
    San Diego, CA.
    Bernd1972;
    The key term I employed is "wattage". That speaks to range. Of course Class B identifies itself as such. It would seem to me that in busy international waters that it would be better to spoof an ID of something non-military and have other ships look for traffic at a specific location than go completely dark. In any event, I'm sure the military vessels of the world have the capability of receiving AIS data and defeating transmission of AIS concurrently. I doubt that civilian Class B is capable of that.
    Irrespective of AIS, both ships had ARPA and should have been aware of their relative positions. There is some speculation that a steering failure or even a cyber-attack caused the collision. We may never know.
  5. bernd1972

    bernd1972 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    238
    Location:
    Flensburg, Germany
    Defeating Transmission? You mean just switching off the outgoing signal while receiving incoming signals? No problem even with my toyboat transponder. And reprogrammung a transponder with some civil ID is something the service people at your local boatyboaty stuff shop can do if they're able to open a notebook.
    But a cyberattack? Who is supposed to do that? The Russians who manipulated yout elections to make Trump become your president? The Chinese who prduce half of the stuff non-edible stuff You buy? Some sort of James Bond - villain?
    What's wrong with the theory that your own navy guys messed it up?
  6. d_meister

    d_meister Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    121
    Location:
    San Diego, CA.
    It's also possible that there was human error on the part of the US Navy, obviously. As for equipment failure or cyber attack; I reported what I read from the Singapore Straits newspaper. I don't have enough information to form an opinion, to say nothing of drawing a conclusion. As for villains, you left out the other guy with a funny haircut.
    Re-programming AIS transponder vessel ID is, of course, possible. I've done it when transferring vessel title on a Furuno Class A. Damned hard to get the software unlock for it, though. Probably on You Tube, now. I am curious about the AIS transponder you have that enables "going dark" while receiving. What brand and model is it?
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    9,492
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Many AIS transponders you can shut off the broadcasting portion of it if you want and just receive AIS. I don't believe the Cyber attack one bit. And, no a cyber attack still wouldn't knock out a radar. The Navy has too many steps in the chain of command. Their officers don't have enough helm time before being promoted and the training on the navigational end of things is seriously lacking these days from what I hear. There definitely is fault on the Mccain's side of the equation. How much who knows yet. But for a much smaller, much faster, much more nimble war ship with the "best" technology on earth to get hit by a container ship, there cannot be at least some liability of fault.
  8. bernd1972

    bernd1972 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2011
    Messages:
    238
    Location:
    Flensburg, Germany
    Obviously quite a number of unfavorable events, probably on both sides concerning the collision(s) led to these tragic results. However, at least a last moment attempt to avoid a collision is something a navy vessel is much more capable of and one should expect a totally different level of situation awareness aboard a warship as that's one of their technological key abilities.
    @d_meister: Concerning my AIS transponder I'll take a look who produced ist, don't remember. But it was one of the cheapest I found, probably from China...
    Considering the other funny guy with strange haircut: I guess they are perfectly happy if one out of three rockets is able to fly and doesn't fall off the sky unintended.
    Suspecting them of beeing able to affect a US warship to a relevant level just might be to much honour...
  9. GhostriderIII

    GhostriderIII Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2015
    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Iceland
    And, millions more to tow it all the way back to Pascagoula or Bath for repairs.

Share This Page