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Reliability and simplicity in the 40-55ft range?

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by zen, Jun 26, 2017.

  1. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I mean yes obviously if you re just just talking tying up to a restaurant it will be harder to find space for the bigger boat but when going out to drop the hook in an anchorage it s just about the same amount of time and "effort".

    Psychologically.... well... I don't know :)
  2. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I agree..... it's a lot easier and faster with a smaller boat. I had one customer that went from a 55' Neptunus to a 32' whaler on a lift behind his house......he can be off the lift in 5 minutes and on his way.......instead of 30 minutes between warm up, shorepower, lines, fenders etc.

    40' and 60' too. 40' you could single hand if you have to, everything is a lot lighter and faster to remove......shorepower, lines, fenders, etc.......
  3. rcrapps

    rcrapps Senior Member

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    I think the last point is, size makes it easier to use; then it's used more often; then less surprises when something fails.
    I do agree with this to a point.:::: lack of use kills a boat faster than when it's used..
  4. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    It's all about how you set up the boat and it's home slip. It never takes me more than 10' to get out. Comparing the first 25 footer i had 30 years ago to my current 53 and even the boats I run (84 at the moment) it's pretty much the same 10' time frame. Hasn't changed. Whether the lines are 3/8 or 3/4... it doesn't take longer. A 50amp cord takes as long as a 100amp to reel in... it takes as long to check the oil on a pair of gassers as it does on a pair of C32s... same with a small westrbke versus a diesel genset 6 times bigger.

    Got to go... I have a fuel delivery appointment in 20' and it's a 10' ride to the fuel dock :)
  5. 30West

    30West Member

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    It's funny how rarely I see the bigger boats leave their slips. It is a bigger operation, but the less they do it the harder it becomes.
  6. bayoubud

    bayoubud Member

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    We have had 30' to 57' in our wet slip and very little difference in effort to take for a run. A lot of boats in Fl owned by absentee owners without a maintenance crew sit for long periods of time with little more than a wash job. Now, in the last year we have learned the easiest to take care of is an "empty boat" slip! lol
  7. 30West

    30West Member

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    If you still have the slip, I guess you could mount chairs and a bimini on the dock, plug in a mini-fridge and ice maker. You would be not much different than a lot of "boaters" who never leave the dock!
  8. rpontual

    rpontual New Member

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    It is funny to see comments regarding how easy is to take a 50’+ boat to a quick ride. I live in Miami Beach and have several neighbors that keep their 50+ boats on the water in front of their homes. Mine is a 36’ (for now) and it is also in front of my home.

    I use my boat every week one or two times unless if the weather is bad. I take it to boat up restaurants just to have lunch/drink or I take it to near sandbars to spend an afternoon.

    My 50+ neighbors take their boat few times a year for trips (3?). They disappear for a week or so. I also take few trips a year, they may go further away than I and may offer much more comfort. But because I use my boat so much, I am “fully tested” for the trip.

    As someone summarized previously. If you want a more dependable boat use it. I would add: ... and to use it pick a size you can dock by yourself as it increases the desire to use it.
  9. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    I think it's good to pick a size boat that is conducive to where you're going to spend most of your time too.
    Many places around me are not equipped for boats larger than, say, 60 feet.
    Hard to get a slip wide enough and or deep enough water, unless you are OK tied to the fuel pier or the pump out dock.
    Limits your destinations quite a bit.
  10. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    There are many reasons people don't use boats and before buying a boat, one needs to think of all those reasons and see if any apply to them. Here are just some:

    -I find myself alone a lot and it's just too much work to handle it and go anywhere just for a few hours.
    -I got it to enjoy with my kids but their lives are so filled with other things, plus they want to be with their friends.
    -My spouse didn't enjoy our first trip on it and she has no interest in using it again.
    -I never get to use it, always working on it.
    -I hoped to use it, but my job doesn't afford me the time. I've been working six and seven days a week, 52 weeks a year.
    -I bought too small or too big a boat.
    -If I go fast to get anywhere it uses way too much fuel and is expensive.
    -The marina where I keep it is so far from my home.
    -I thought I'd love it, but I find boating boring.
  11. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I think usage is more about personal preferences than size. Here in my marina I see plenty of 30 to 40 footers which rarely get out of the slip.

    And as someone mentioned it s also about being to handle the boat by being proficient in its handling. The less you do it the worst you get and the less you will use it and it has nothing nothing to do with size

    Layout is also important. Some boats are a breeze to single hand. My 53 hatt has a lower helm with side doors so the spring lines are just a few steps away. On MYs without side doors having controls on the aft decks, preferably on both sides make it a breeze to single hand. On the other hand if you have a 40' sportfish and have to dock from the FB, by the time you get down to the lines you may have been blown of.
  12. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    The easiest to handle are the center consoles, although our 44' Riva comes very close, just can't walk to the bow.
  13. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    How can a boat on which you can't walk to the bow be easy to handle ?
  14. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    It's a small boat, you can easily reach to the dock, it handles well, it's open, lot's of power, twins, bow thruster, less than 13' beam. Putting it anywhere you want is very easy, or at least is for the two of us. No different really than the runabouts we owned on the lake. We never walked to the bow to dock them.
  15. bayoubud

    bayoubud Member

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    Ha, already have that on our covered deck near by...which we call Paradise. Next best thing to a boat and way easier to maintain. Need a cd with a boat engine running to make it more realistic...plus a couple of helm chairs! Maybe with a fighting chair too! This is starting to sound pretty darn good! :D
  16. 30West

    30West Member

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    Do you have a firepit you shovel wads of money into for hours at a time, and occasionally heap it full of large bills and light it off? For realism ;)
  17. bayoubud

    bayoubud Member

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    Nope, be too much like the real thing!
  18. Fletcher500

    Fletcher500 Member

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    Great boating weather lately. Air and water are warm here in SoCal.

    Our boat is 44 ft. And I often run it solo, especially off season when the Admiral and my adult kids are not interested. I will often go out, turn off the engines and drift, or anchor when I am by myself, so the fuel burn is low.

    Regarding size, the next one would be 50 ft., but I can't rationalize the impact to get a slip. Larger Slips are tough to get in SoCal. If we lived in FL, I would have already bought the 50.

    Lots of boating the past 2 months and we are heading out for a 10 day in a few weeks. A short trip in the world of offshore boating, but we are excited.

    Now when I retire...
  19. Ormond Bert54

    Ormond Bert54 Senior Member

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    When my Bertram 54' is running again, I plan to create a schedule for running the boat even if I cannot do it myself. My maintenance person already regularly cleans the Racor's, services the batteries, services the through hulls, cleans the bottom, replaces zincs, etc. Maybe every 2 weeks (if I have not used the boat), my maintenance person can start both engines and run them up to operating temperature.

    I agree that the only reliable boat is one that is used regularly.

    On the subject of which size boat gets used more regularly? The more luxurious and comfortable the boat is, the more I enjoy spending time on it. My vote goes to the big comfy boat.
  20. bayoubud

    bayoubud Member

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    You have a good plan. On two different occasions this year Cat diesel mechanics have said to at least run engines at the dock every two weeks, to warm up to operating temp and run @ 1200/1500rpm for 10 minutes, to lube cylinders and exercise valves to keep seats from rusting and pitting. Their explanation is it is the water/condensation in the exhaust system and aftercoolers that is constantly migrating to the turbos and cylinders via open valves while sitting for extended periods of time. It is visible with the right bore scope on some engines that have threaded insert plugs on turbos/risers and aftercoolers for access. If those plugs have never been removed they might be seized. Most mechanics don't bother scoping even on surveys unless you require it.

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