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Transport Fl. boat or sell and buy local PNW boat

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by gcsi, Jul 8, 2021.

  1. gcsi

    gcsi Member

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    Trying to make a long story short… Own a 2002 75 Hatteras MY that I’ve dressed-out to my liking. Have installed SeaKeeper, remodeled Salon / Galley, new soft goods throughout, new flooring, etc, etc. Boat is currently located in Florida and would like to reposition for use in Seattle. All of my boating experience is Gulf Coast, Florida and islands further south.

    From a logistical perspective, I’m unexpectedly stuck in Southern California for a few more years and commuting to Fl. is getting old. New plan is to commute to Seattle area for 2-3 week blocks of time and cruise while there.

    I’m told that reverse cycle HVAC will struggle with heating loads and should plan on installing Diesel Fired heating system. What other issues would one typically face bringing a southern boat north?

    I understand the area is wonderful in summer, can I stay on / use boat Dec - Feb if weather cooperates?

    Someone also mentioned that impacts with Logs are not uncommon and to plan on cruising at hull speed as a consequence. Are Logs that much of a concern or overstated? If logs are a legitimate concern, Stab Fins and running gear are totally “exposed”, makes me cringe to think of impacting a partially submerged log… People have also mentioned that dock space for boats larger than 65’ becomes difficult to find when venturing north of Victoria, is this also true? Given all of the above, Is the Hatt not well suited to cruising PNW?

    When factoring in costs associated with transportation and HVAC surgery, does it make sense to sell Florida boat and then buy something more suited to cruising PNW? OR, do brokers fees on both sides of deal totally negate transportation and HVAC costs and it becomes a question of suitability?

    Assuming I go the transport route, will flexibility on my part help obtain more favorable pricing. My “window” for transportation could be as broad as mid July 2021 - April 2022.

    Sorry for the rambling post, excitedly awaiting replies.

    brett
  2. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    Moving boats by transport isn’t trouble free but it’s a viable strategy for many. Yes sometimes booking early or last minute will get you a better rate. Depends on demand.
    Sounds like you’ve got a handle on the basics for boating in the PNW. The challenge may be finding another boat there that meets your requirements.
    If you love the boat you’ve got I would lean towards moving it.
  3. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Easy enough to transport the boat. As to what you're being told:

    Dock space is at a shortage in the PNW regardless of size and type boat. A lot of waiting lists but still some of nicer marinas have space. Those there think of it as expensive. Compared to Tampa, they are not.

    As to reverse cycle vs. diesel fired system, I know the PNW boaters push the diesel as essential. While it is better if you're trying to use the boat in the dead of winter, there are not a lot of days it's inadequate as winter temperatures are generally highs in 40's, lows in 30's. Not a lot of the 20 degree and lower weather. You can always add diesel heat. I'd try it one year and then decide.

    You've got a boat you love. I'd keep it.

    Now I must ask, why the PNW? You say you're stuck in Southern California and the Tampa commute is getting old. I don't know where in Southern California, but don't see the PNW commute solving your problem. Yes, a 3 hour flight vs. 8 hours. But all the early arrival and boarding and getting transportation remain the same so more like 6 hours vs. 11 and a day spent either way. So, the obvious question, I must ask is why not keep the boat in Southern California?
  4. JadePanama

    JadePanama Member

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    Hey there. as a PNW boater, I think folks are over blowing the concerns. We only have reverse cycle heat in our 60' and its WAY more than adequate. we had diesel heat in our prior vessel and it was great, but i wouldnt spent the $$ retrofitting given what you have.
    the cruising up here is amazing and get the desire for a change.

    as for logs, yeah, they are here and there, but i would still say the majority of big boats and friends that i know still go everywhere at cruise speed. We tend to go slower (10kt) but just because i am cheap lol.

    moorage is tough like it is everywhere, but there are always spots that open up. if you are willing to go a little out of seattle there are plenty around. even in seattle on the lake or sound you can usually always find one if you search diligently.

    best of luck.
  5. DOCKMASTER

    DOCKMASTER Senior Member

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    Transport can be fairly straightforward. There is a transport ship that routes from Florida to Ensenada then up to Victoria BC. I moved my boat from Ensenada to Victoria. Pretty easy really.

    The log issue is overstated. Are there logs - yes. Can you run at cruising speeds with a watchful eye - yes. I'm in SE Alaska that has more logs than Puget Sound and I run at 25+ knots regularly. However, I will not run at night nor would I ever leave the boat underway on AP with the helm unattended.

    Heat is a preference issue. Your system may be able add supplemental heat strips to overcome cold water. Some reverse cycle seem to do OK. As mentioned by others, you can always add diesel heat if you decide you want/need it.
  6. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    I think you're right about overblown. Are logs worse than traps? We went to Alaska and spent months in total in the PNW and didn't hit a log, but from the warnings we got you would have thought it was unsafe to navigate.

    Similarly on the heat. If starting from scratch you might choose diesel but reverse cycle will cover most days and nights.

    I do think moorage is more difficult there than most other areas, but if you're flexible in price and location it's available.
  7. gcsi

    gcsi Member

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    We’re in LA area. We have access to private aviation, so the travel experience is more palatable. Drive to airport, park car in hanger then into plane and on our way on both ends. Door to door for Seattle area should be about 4 hrs.

    after a lifetime of sun, Dermatoligist strongly encourages that it’s time to stop.

    My wife and I are very active. Wherever we are, the ability to get out and about on foot and hike/explore is important to us. With Respect to marinas in LA, to say crime is under reported may be a bit of an understatement and we are uncomfortable walking in and around many of the beachside communities having had first hand experience with random violent crime in Santa Monica.

    We’ve also looked at SoCal cruising, I just don’t see it as particularly enjoyable with not many interesting places to visit. Additionally, I have philosophical issues surrounding how Ca. “Taxes” visiting boats. As the old saying goes, I’ll vote with my wallet.

    The one thing SoCal does have is proximity to Mexico, however, I’m not interested in Mexico.
  8. CaboFly

    CaboFly Member

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    I boat in PNW with reverse cycle heat and I also cruise at 30 knots most the time. Do you have to pay attention. Yes or you will hit something. When the Temps dip in Dec to March it will test your system but if in good shape you will be fine.
    The shortage of slips is currently a reality but there are options. If I were living on boat and had private aviation I would slip in Roche Harbor.
  9. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    Couldn’t agree more about SoCal. I grew up in CA. I’ve been on the water since the 1960’s, a boat captain in the 1970’s and a boat owner since the 1980’s. If it wasn’t for offshore sport fishing and Mexico I would have little interest. Yes there’s Catalina Island, some SCUBA and other interests but I’ve heard many people when selling their boat say it’s because there’s just no place to go.
    Crime in CA is out of control and on the coast in particular where masses of the “unhoused” now congregate. But if you bring that up you are quickly shouted down as some sort of hate filled monster. The auto glass companies aren’t complaining though.
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2021
    CJmesk likes this.
  10. DOCKMASTER

    DOCKMASTER Senior Member

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    Lots of places to explore from Puget Sound - The Sound itself, San Juan's, B.C. and when you're ready the trip from Puget Sound to Alaska is incredible.
  11. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Just a warning, the sun in the PNW is sneakier and I know several people there with histories of skin cancer. The PNW sun doesn't warn you as much as other areas. We push sun lotion like we own the companies making it and we always have a top up.

    As to taxes, you'll find out Washington isn't exactly tax free either when it comes to boats.

    Now as to door to door time, I was including a change of planes so door to door thinking we're talking 4 vs 7 hours or so.
  12. gcsi

    gcsi Member

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    My door to door is leaving door of our home and walking into door of boat
  13. gcsi

    gcsi Member

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    Sounds more promising by the moment. Making plans to go up for a week and reconnoiter area. Will report back with particular findings. Now if I could find fresh water mooring close to cruising areas, will have died and gone to heaven!
    kevin8tor likes this.
  14. DOCKMASTER

    DOCKMASTER Senior Member

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    For fresh water you need to go into Lake Union or Lake Washington. Lots of boats there. More expensive and you have Ballard locks to deal with to get in/out when you want. But lots of people love it on the Lakes.
  15. JadePanama

    JadePanama Member

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    I’m with CaboFly…nice private airstrip right at the marina in Roche Harbor and super close to many nice cruising grounds throughout the San Juan’s. Also if Canada ever opens, very easy departure place for that.

    If you want Fresh Water then as said above Lake Union is right downtown. We moor our vessel there and really enjoy the location.
  16. gcsi

    gcsi Member

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    Another question; Is there a definitive Cruising Guide for the PNW? Thinking along the lines of a Dodge Guide for the Abacos equivalent.
  17. JadePanama

    JadePanama Member

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  18. Ward

    Ward Senior Member

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    Waggoners Guide is regularly updated and covers a lot. For more detail, some of the books that used to be Fine Edge Publishing that are now part of Waggoner are here:

    https://www.waggonerguidebooks.com/store/c5/fineedge-cruisingthenw

    I've got a couple of the books by Don Douglass and Reanne Hemingway Douglass and have found them to be good for planning and getting ideas, e.g.:

    https://www.waggonerguidebooks.com/store/p108/expscbc.html

    I don't know how up to date they are, the books by Peter Vassilopoulos were pretty much "the standard" back in the days when he wrote for Pacific Yachting magazine.

    As a guidebook it's long out of date (I think it came out in the 1970's when I was a kid and our family cruised up and down the coast a couple summers), but as a source of historical information, this is awesome:

    https://evergreen-pacific-publishin..._id=15&zenid=a0c3cb00ee0441399379e069c3f70f89
  19. Boatbuilder

    Boatbuilder New Member

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    Lots of good advice here. One thing not mentioned is as we very seldom need AC here in Washington and BC, the diesel heat option allows both hot water and heat as needed without running the generator.
  20. CaboFly

    CaboFly Member

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    When it was 100 degrees last week I sure enjoyed the AC on the boat. I use my AC almost every trip in the summer. While not required I had a number of friends last week that were miserable on their trawlers in the heat wave that came through Seattle.