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Sport fisher vs trawler

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by jeff91, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. jeff91

    jeff91 New Member

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    Hey guys,
    My dad and I are looking at new boats uner the 40Ft range, we have a 43 ft easment at our dock. We are looking at both sport fishers, riviera 36 w/ cummings 330 being one, and fast trawlers liek the mainship 34/39. I know the main ship will get a lot better fuel consumption at 8 knots but I knwo we will not go that slow that often especially when we have a follwoing sea. I would imagine in the trawler going at least 11 knots. Does anyone have any experence with the fuel consumption on either of theses boats? Or does anyone have any suggestion on a diesel boat under 40 ft that can goes faster than 11 knots and get decent fuel consumtion... we are big divers and fisher. Any input would be great!
  2. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Well, if you are big divers and big fishers, why would you even consider a trawler? It sounds like a Sportfish is the only thing to consider. A sportfish will get the same fuel economy as the mainship at 8 knots. I'd take a look at a 35' Carolina Classic, a 40' Cabo, as well as a few others.
  3. gccolvin

    gccolvin Guest

    Thanks for asking that question- I originally was sold on the trawlers, but after reading some items concerning the Hatteras MYs, and a bit of searching I fell upon the sportfish boats, and as Capt. J and others have said, at slow speeds, they can be equally as efficient!
    Plus they look great, and have the ability to get up and go as well... I am hoping some folks will chime in on this thread!
    Good luck in your search!

    Yachtfish livability?
    Maintenance issues versus trawlers?
    Range and Deck space seem to be the obvious downsides?
  4. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    The question should be forwarded to SF yachts fans, would you cross the ocean in a SF boat or a trawler?

    Regarding livability, many do live aboard sport fishing boats, because of the beam, it has good inner living space and nice arrangement.
    About maintenance issues, engine rooms in trawlers are bigger, single engine, smaller wing engine, a generator, other than that they would have the same equipment, the trawler might even have more backup electronics.

    Add to the SF Vs. Trawler question: Would you be able to walk around the outer decks of a SF in heavy conditions safely?

    An interesting question just came to me and I think Captain James have talked about this before but it would be nice to elaborate more on the subject here, can one enhance the range efficiency on a SF boat by operating 1 engine alone? and how would that effect the speed, ride and stability?

    Cheers,
  5. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    You're better off running a sportfish at slow speeds on both engines. 1 engine would be severly overloaded at each RPM point because it is propped based upon both engines running. A sportfish at 10 knots or below is generally very fuel efficient by nature utilizing both engines. The boat would sort of be crabbing on 1 engine because it's not on centerline and the rudders would be pretty far over.......

    Why would you have any need or want to go on the front deck of a sportfish in the middle of the ocean while underway? On most you can avoid the walkways altogether and pop out of the bow hatch if need be........

    I've crossed oceans in both trawlers and sportfish. In the Sportfish it was nice to have 25 knots to get up and go when the weather was starting to kick up. I've take a 35' Cabo FB from ft. laud to Belize and crossed 350nm of ocean (Key West to Cancun) without thinking about it......or maybe I should have.....we had a very good weather window.......I've done the same trip in a 44' Lagoon powercat as well as many others.......
  6. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    Let me clarify the ocean crossing question, because it interests "GCCOLVIN" and effects his choice of boat, how would the crossing be on both a SF and a trawler from St. Maarten to Cape Verde 2000+nm away? GCCOLVIN works in South Africa and want to be able to head to the Caribbean or maybe cross Drake passage, I would also like him comment if I got his needs right or not.

    Thanks Captain J, I enjoy reading your posts a lot by the way.

    Regards,
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012
  7. gccolvin

    gccolvin Guest

    Hi Alfred,
    Well, yes that does actually answer my question, although, I actually live in Texas, but work in Africa :) That being said, mostly due to my lack of experience or knowledge regarding open seas navigation, I began my search feeling that nothing but a sturdy, stout steel hulled trawler would suit me, I live on a OSV 6 months of a year, and although I don't see myself napping peacefully in 20'ers like I can now, the trawlers resemble what I am used too!
    Now, I've been looking at the Hatts, and they seem to be touted for some of those exact things- sturdy, stout, longevity? (Yes I think they look great as well, and I am young enough to let that influence me, but i may not be by the time I purchase, lol)
    So, basically what it means is, tachtfish make good live aboards due to beam, CAN be efficient as a trawler, with abilities to move quickly if needed, but crossing the Atlantic is probably not going to happen successfully or safely in one? Right?
    But what short of transoceanic cruising, what type of weather would turn the Responsible Yachtfish Captain around, where the trawler Capt, would just keep on trawling?
    At the end of the day guys, I'm here to learn, and the wind in my world is changing daily, so bare with me, as you have! Thanks for all the info. this forum is great!
  8. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    It wouldn't matter what type of yacht you buy, because the only way to get a yacht this size from St. Maarten to Cape Verde, would be on the deck of a freighter. With few exceptions, a Nordhavn 46' would be one of them. Many sailboats would be other exceptions.
  9. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    A Yachtfish or a Hatteras SF is suitable (and designed) to run at 8 to 10 knots and be comfortable in reasonable seas offshore for trips that are not trans ocean, but I can’t imagine any skipper taking a sportfish or yachtfish out for a 7 or 10 day trip without considering a safe port to take refuge in case things turn bad.
    Forget any crossing of oceans, it would be like taking a sports car off road, you may get a good run for a while, but sooner or later you will hit conditions where the design criteria doesn’t match the situation.
    A displacement/trawler can be a fishing boat ANYTIME anywhere, but a sportfish can’t be a trawler in bad seas.
    Plus there is range and economy. You would be better off buying 2 sportfish, one in the US, the other across the Atlantic, than paying for transportation of the boat.

    I have done some long trips in my boat. Fuel economy on a 53 Hatteras (1971 Convertible) with 12V71n’s is approximately 40 to 45 litres an hour at 8 to 10 knots in moderate seas and swell (1 to 2 metre seas with 1 to 2 metre swell), while running a 20kw genset much of the time.
    On long trips, I always have a port within reach in case things turn bad, keeping in mind that very often it can be as dangerous getting into these ports in bad seas as it would staying out, so if possible I will have more than 1 option to go to.

    BTW, I have fished in Africa years ago. The seas off Mozambique are incredible for marlin and other pelagics. Keep in mind though, unless things have changed (I doubt they have), there is NO Coast Guard there to help or much help if you get into trouble. If you check out Google maps for Bazaruto and Santa Carolina Island, these were amazing places to fish and enjoy in the 1960’s and early 70’s. Dammmn that makes me feel old! I was a kid then:D
  10. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    The 36 Riviera is a solid boat. I owned a 1994 for a few years. I can't remember the fuel consumption. We did a lot of offshore fishing and it was a great boat for family weekends cruising and fishing etc. There were no big problems, the Riv 36 was one of the most popular models they built .
    I did have a bad moment in a following sea, crossing a bar (you guys call them inlets) coming in at low tide with large pressure waves, the stern started facing the wrong way…..boat was broaching and tipped so far over the TV didn’t just change channels, it changed sides, from Port to Stbd! BUT, that was my fault, I should have kept the throttles down or come in later.
  11. gccolvin

    gccolvin Guest

    I think I have come to understand what I should have already--- Purchase a boat that is designed for your needs!!
    I love the layouts, looks, and available speeds of the sportfish, but, it makes perfect sense that it is designed for sportfishing, not long term cruising, so, for me, its back to the trawlers!
    In reality, looking through photos of both, my Sportfish obsession ends when I get to the engine room, and as JWY pointed out to me, 1-engine 1-genny= simple(er) maintenance...
    One more bit of insight from my perspective- I have 8 1200hp CATs sitting on the deck of this vessel, and I know from experiences, that they will certainly run at idle or low power for hours, if not days, but they are designed to run at power, otherwise, they soot up, etc., etc., I imagine a sportfish engines would be comparable at 8-10 knots?
    Here is another comparison though, when looking at the Hatts, I found many, MANY, older models, that apparently are still being used, maintained, etc. What types of full displacement trawlers would i be looking at that have longevity such as that?
  12. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Virginia Reel, fishing under sail

    Long ago there was another gentleman who like fishing under sail. He had Phil Rhodes design him a 44' steel hulled vessel they termed the Virginia Reels. Have a look here:
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/general-sailing-discussion/6710-motor-sailers-philip-rhodes-john-alden.html#post41696

    Then have a look at this 'upgraded' version of the 44'. I'm working on just such a project
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/general-sailing-discussion/6710-motor-sailers-philip-rhodes-john-alden-6.html#post132022

    PS: You might find I've had an interest in this subject for awhile ;)
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/general-catamaran-discussion/1548-gamefishing-sail-under-sail-power.html
  13. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    Hi

    Key word ocean maybe but I see boats all the time with the "safety lanyard" hooked to the anchor chain to stop the accidental deployment of said anchor while underway. I have often wondered what to do if your caught in gale or wacked by lightning ...lost power in a storm and had to send your wife up on deck to loose the lanyard......she'd be miffed. the Lanyard should be in the locker instead although that would be a PITA to get to regularly.......
  14. dec0guy

    dec0guy New Member

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    We have been trying to make a similar decision, purchase a sport fisher or a trawler.

    I would love to be able to far afield in a trawler, and one day I am planning to. But at this stage 99% of my boating will be day trips or weekends away, and i would prefer to travel at 25knots and get to my favourite diving/fishing spots, rather than spends 3 times as long going at 8 knots, and probably not be able to get to my spots in the one day.

    So for now a sport fisher it is, just need to find the right one!
  15. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    Why would you not want to use all of the deck area on a boat?
    To be out in a gentle swell and be able to go out on the front deck (without dangling feet over the side!) and enjoy the sounds, get some sun or watch the dolphins and whales is great.
    On many 10 hour fishing trips my passengers would go out on the front deck to do this, breaks up the long hours of trolling.
    Then the safety aspect as previously mentioned. I don’t get it that safety is put aside for ascetics. I like your idea when there are no rails, of using the forward hatch to access the anchor, but once out there it is not safe to move around, especially on the Carolina flared boats.
    Then there is the regular need to get the fenders in place when mooring, just not safe without bow rails.
    Just my 2c.
  16. Liberty

    Liberty Senior Member

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    All agreed!
  17. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    You sit up there at 35 knots :rolleyes: LOLOLOLOL

    There's no problems getting to the bow of a sportfish on a nice day at hull speeds.......with or without fenders. I worked on a 75' Jim Smith SF years ago, it had no bowrail and was no issue carrying fenders, or getting lines, or doing whatever you had to do up there at hull speeds......or docking......
  18. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    35 knots!!! Are you kidding James, I would get 30 knots if I hooked a Humpback and made it angry by playing a Japanese opera on the loud hailer.....otherwise with my 12V71N's I am happy to get 18 knots with my head down over the helm (keeps the wind resistance down) and the tide and wind up my a**s!
    Meanwhile, when it comes to docking with my family helping out with fenders, I will go with caution and have the bow rails in place of holding my breath wondering if one of the crew could end up being crushed between a 65000lb boat and a jetty/pontoon.
  19. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    The tougher questipon asked in this thread relates a sportfisher to a trawler in a length overall no greater than 43', including swimplatforms and bow pulpits - yes the marinas will measure your boats out west.

    There are not a lot of fast trawlers out there in this size that can compare with sportfishers, and the Mainship is not going to be the sea boat that a more capable sportfish will be.

    It will most likely come down to budget (as it always does), which wasn't stated by jeff91 in his original post. As I see it, you have the Mainship or possibly Bayliner 38 or an older 38 Californian as a fast trawler choice that will fit the slip.

    The first choice on the sportfisher side (in my opinion:) would be a Cabo 40 but you would have to lose the swimplatform, which a diver most likely would not want to compromise on. There are a lot of capable used sportfishers available under $100K on the west coast, look at the Blackfin or Bertram 38 or Hatteras 37/38 or even a Uniflite 38. They will do better in a bigger sea than the fast trawlers in your class, but most of the older sportfishers will cruise in the 17 - 22 knot range.

    I would recommend to purchase the biggest boat possible in your budget that fits your 43' slip.
  20. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

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    Ascetics put almost everything aside.