Click for Bering Click for Llebroc Click for St. Pete Port Click for EMP Click for Christensen

Provisioning the galley for the first time

Discussion in 'Yacht Crews' started by Filipe1, Jan 16, 2017.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. Filipe1

    Filipe1 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Japan
    Hello everyone.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this post.

    It's all about provisioning the boat for the first time as a Chef on your first yacht job.

    Next March, i will be in the Cote d Azur to start looking for chef work.

    This will become my first work in this industry.
    Been a chef for nearly 20 years.

    I'm a bit worried about the provisioning way.
    How chefs do it??
    They go and buy food for every charter or in bulk( at least the frozen food)

    I'm not sure the way it works and I'm stressing about it.



    Should I make a weekly menu, they buy what is needed??

    Any help would be great.


    Thanks again for taking the time of reading this thread!!


    Filipe
  2. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,798
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    Disclaimer: I am not a chef... I m captain who impersonates a chef but being French... well... it s in the genes :)

    Yes, we plan the menus ahead based on the guest preference sheets and buy the food based on the ingredients needed

    We run charters in the Exumas so there is no second chance getting stuff during the charters. In the med I guess you can get stuff almost every day although it takes time... and time is one thing you don't have on charter

    We keep a lot of basic stuff on the boat just to be able to deal with last minute changes
  3. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    4,576
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    You should work from menu. That is your greatest protection at the start. However, you also need to have certain things for charter guests who choose a different meal than what you planned. You must build in some flexibility as Pascal says. Things that are always good fallbacks. Hopefully you do get in advance the guests preferences and any allergies or food they don't eat.

    You are cruising in an area in which you can provision between charters. For several reasons you'll want to provision between each charter, among them being keeping the charges straight as the guests are responsible for provisions.

    One difference in chef on a yacht vs. in a restaurant is that the menu and meals are driven by the guests and what they like and want, not by your favorites or the restaurant's specialties.

    One other comment. Make friends with the chief stew and all the stews. Bend over backwards to be friends. They are the ones who present your meals to the guests and who sell you to the guests. They are also the ones who have to deal with complaints and special requests and can make them peaceful and easy or difficult. They're the ones who buy you 15 more minutes when you need it.

    What size boat and how many guests?
  4. Filipe1

    Filipe1 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Japan
    Merci Pascal!!!

    I guess, for my first job, it will be charter in the med. So I feel more relax knowing this.

    But if in middle of the ocean, guest ask for something that we don't have. Does it create a problem??


  5. Filipe1

    Filipe1 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Japan
    I haven't start working on yacht yet, just been a bit nervous about it.

    But for example, out of the blue, the guest wants a molecular dinner party, like me, i never learned about molecular cuisine!! What can I do!!??

    Thanks for all your advice!!


  6. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    4,576
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Can you read? I don't mean that facetiously. I think that's all you'll have to do to do molecular or most cuisines. That would typically be requested in advance so you'd have time to get ingredients and time to practice a little. Even if not, if you're an experienced chef, you can go far outside your specialties. The basics don't change. It's ingredients, preparation and presentation. Molecular is presentation mostly. Be honest about your experience in it. If the main charterer approaches asking for it, tell them it's new to you but you're a little familiar and will be glad to try. Knowing you're doing that will go a long way. Find the easiest spectacular things. For instance, transparent ravioli is simple, just need to get some edible film discs. That should be easy where you'll be.

    Now, if you haven't studied molecular, then I'd do so now and look at other cuisines you're not experienced with. Just, cooking wise, there is nothing truly difficult for a chef in changing cuisines. I couldn't cook any cuisine, other than grill meat, but I wouldn't think there are any you couldn't prepare given the ingredients and time to do the presentation.

    I'd say most yacht chefs find themselves going on the internet periodically to pull up recipes.
  7. Filipe1

    Filipe1 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Japan
    Thanks a lot for your help.
    This is what I wanted to hear!!

    Thanks again

    Filipe

  8. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    3,798
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    We have 10 years of happy guests behind us, many repeats... and i had never heard of molecular cuisine until now. Looked it up and I still don't know what it really is and why would anyone would it that stuff
  9. Filipe1

    Filipe1 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Japan
    Lol, same for me.

    I know about this kind of cuisine but like you, just weird, doesn't make my mouth watering.

    But people love it tho!!!

  10. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    4,576
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    It's art with food. It's all about the appearance, nothing at all unique about the foods used. Some is simple. It is something used by restaurants to distinguish themselves from everyone else. It is a fun approach. It's like decorating but doing it with the food. Some just call it Modernist. It's also a bit experimental. What if I take this liquid and put it in a cube, could I then cook it? I think some is cool to look at but most is not appealing at all to me to eat. I like plain simple food. Now, the thing is that if someone requests it, they're open to most an crazy idea you might have. I think the color changing drinks are interesting and the clear edible film. I've only been to a restaurant with it one time and, not surprisingly, that was in LA. I wouldn't have known what I was eating much of the time if I hadn't seen the menu, but some of those with us thought it was fun and couldn't stop giggling and laughing.
  11. ychtcptn

    ychtcptn Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Lighthouse Point, FL
    "One other comment. Make friends with the chief stew and all the stews. Bend over backwards to be friends. They are the ones who present your meals to the guests and who sell you to the guests. They are also the ones who have to deal with complaints and special requests and can make them peaceful and easy or difficult. They're the ones who buy you 15 more minutes when you need it."

    I can't stress this enough. Coming from a restaurant you will not be used to having the "servers" tell you what to do! The stews are your eyes and ears, as you will not have much interaction with the guests. I have seen many a restaurant chef fail because they could not get a long with the stews. This is not your kingdom, we all work as a team. Take your self down a few notches, coming on here and asking for help is a good first start.

    Another thing, you are there to cook what they want, not what you want, listen carefully and always be prepared. Your Captain should be able to help you with the provisioning and how much you can store. Good lists and proper preparation are key. The rest of the crew will be extremely busy and to have to run out everyday for your stuff will get old real quick.

    I was on my previous boat for a long time and breaking in a new chef was always a gamble, I saw many fail and was lucky enough to have several great ones that were with me for several years each. To be honest I stopped hiring the big time experienced chefs as most of them failed on me for several different reasons. The young ambitious ones worked the best, so just remember you might have all the experience in the world but you are stepping into a new world. Be the best crew member you can be, cook well for the crew, treat them with respect and lend a hand everywhere and they will do the same for you.
  12. Filipe1

    Filipe1 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Japan
    Thanks a lot for your comment.

    I never though about the chief stew and stews.
    Different kind of work and environment!!! Well, i will do my best.
    I normally get well with every body.

    Thanks again.


Share This Page