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Perini Navi - Maltese Falcon; Sailing Yacht

Discussion in 'Perini Navi Yacht' started by hufloas, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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  2. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Looks like Richard Branson has followed in Tom's tracks to Mr Hawkes for a submersible of his own. This one needed to be superlight to put aboard Branson's new 105' catamaran.

    Virgin Necker Nymph

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  3. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    If you look back on this page, back in February of this year, I posted on the "Necker Nymph" and her being for "Necker Belle"...

    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/tenders-dinghies/8770-megayacht-tenders-ii-3.html
  4. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    I finally found that photo of the small test vessel that has eluded me so long.

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  5. lobo

    lobo Senior Member

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    How do you tack a vessel (cat or mono) with a single mast dyna rig? in higher wind speeds and wave heights?

    I understand Maltese Falcon has to back her sails on the foremast to come about in anything more than flat water.
  6. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    I guess that would depend upon what you refer to ashigh wind speeds and wave heights, if it were really high in both cases I would guess tacking was out of the question and gybing would be the way to change course by sail.


    It used to be standard practise for old square riggers to need to back the head sails to aid a change of tack, don't see why it should be that much different on a big new cruiser.
  7. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    You are correct lobo, it can present a problem with a single masted dynarig. This might be even more noticable on a multihull vessel that doesn't have that weight inertia to carry herself thru the tack. Likely the mast would require very quick rotation. And/or maybe a headsail adaptation.

    Here is the tacking manuver for MF as described by one of her crew in an earlier posting:
    Tacking Big Bird
    http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/36088-post164.html
  8. lobo

    lobo Senior Member

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    Thanks Brian for the link, I had seen that tacking procedure explained in a Perini Navi drawing before.

    Probably best then to reserve the dyna rig for multi-mast applications, and not burden a single-mast setup with additional complexity from foresails. And go with proven conventional bermuda rigs, or maybe aero rigs, for our smaller yachts.
  9. lobo

    lobo Senior Member

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    Absolutely, as long as you have more than one mast with square sails ....
  10. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Improving Sailing Qualities of Square Rig Ships

    Not a bold approach...be adventurous like Tom Perkins in building the Maltese Falcon when MANY naysayers said don't.

    Perhaps there are some lessons here?

    BRIGS AND POLACRES WITH WINDWARD ABILITY
    (Improving the sailing qualities of square rigged ships)
    Philip Goode, A.M.R.I.N.A., I.Eng.
    http://www.yachtingdirect.com/white_papers/philip_goode/weatherly_square_riggers.htm
  11. lobo

    lobo Senior Member

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    A bit too adventurous for my liking, to sign up for a single stick dyna rig – knowing that you can only make it tack properly by later adding a foresail to the sail plan.
    Adventure factor might become acceptable, once you get to a (beyond my) size range where 2+ masts begin to make sense.

    Vaguely related question: very few bermuda rig cruising catamarans have in-boom furling mainsails, quite different from monohulls. Any special (cat related?) reason for that, beyond general weight reduction efforts?
  12. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    In Estonia they were using wooden sails already in the late 1930:s...

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  13. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    In-boom verses Stackpack

    In general the multihull vessels are utilizing much bigger roaches in their mainsails, and full length battens to support those roaches. The upper battens are most often not parallel with the boom and this would cause lots of problems with in-boom furling.

    In-boom furling is not as straight forward as it might be supposed. The 'stack pack' system garnered greater use in cruising multihulls.
    http://www.doylesails.com/cruising/stackpack/index.html

    There are other reasons for this less popular use of in-boom furling on multihuuls, but it might get into significant more discussions.
  14. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Interesting AMG, is that first photo really a rigid wooden sail?
  15. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    I am not sure, as this is from an old article. They had both combined wood/fabric and wood with thin veneer. Seen from above, the sail has a symmetric wing profile. They were better upwind than downwind compared to normal sails.

    At the time they were common and they were convinced that wooden sails should replace the white on all boats...
  16. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Amaryllis Experiment

    Looks to be some sort of thin membrane material that needed battens to help it with aero shape...both horizontal ones and one vertical one

    But it goes to show you there was lots of experimentation going on even in those early days of sailing. Sometimes it hard to convince sailors to accept new ideas :rolleyes:

    ..ie:
    " I can with a good whole-sail breeze, boat to windward faster, by a mile an hour at least, than any other sailing vessel afloat." -Nathanael Herreshoff , the infamous yacht designer speaking of his revolutionary 25' catamaran design, Amaryllis.
    .....the year, 1876
  17. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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  18. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    David vs Goliath

    I'm a wee bit late reporting this news, as somehow I was totally unaware of it :?:. I must have been somewhere in outer space.

    Maltese Falcon vs Gunboat cat

    phaedo_richard_langdon_600.jpg


    ...excerpted from the start of the TransAtlantic 2011 Race..
    Newport, R.I. USA (June 29, 2011) – This morning, the tension was mounting dockside as 14 yachts made final preparations before they took the second start of the Transatlantic Race 2011 in a spectacular scene full of drama.

    While the first start of the day produced some high drama, the start for the two yachts in the Open Class was just as extraordinary. As the magnificent 298’ Maltese Falcon unfurled acres of canvas and entered the starting area, the Gunboat 66, Phaedo, owned by Lloyd Thornburg (St. Barthelemy) was dwarfed in comparison. Phaedo is one of the world’s most head-turning maritime creations and the carbon fibre, Lamborghini-orange catamaran has become one of the most well-known yachts on the regatta circuit. However, the spectacle of the Art Deco giant, Maltese Falcon, dominated the proceedings, announcing its intentions with a bone-rattling blast of colossal air-horns to warn spectator yachts that they were about to tack for the line. It was a full five minutes before the three rotating rigs, each weighing 30 tons, completed their revolutions and Maltese Falcon heeled over bound for the start of the Transatlantic Race 2011. Phaedo, however, was far more exuberant and timed the approach to perfection, coming up under Maltese Falcon. At first they were caught in the enormous wind shadow of their leviathan nemesis, but as Phaedo came out of the wind hole, gasping for air, the crew onboard hauled in the sheets. Pulling the trigger, Phaedo accelerated away from the opposition, but not for long. Weighing in at an unbelievable 1110 tons, Maltese Falcon soon overhauled Phaedo and the rest of the fleet in today’s start, achieving a boat speed of over 14 knots.

    http://www.transatlanticrace.org/news/53-2011-news/297-ocean-theatre-dramatic-spectacle.html


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIWmgjlK2bM
  19. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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  20. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Nice read!

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