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Nautical Terminology

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by SeaLion, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. SeaLion

    SeaLion Senior Member

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    What do you call it when you are "un-anchoring" to move the boat elsewhere? I have always used the term "weigh anchor" but lately I've been hearing "pull anchor" and other phrases that make me cringe.

    Speaking of anchors, I also hear "I've got 50 feet of chain and 250 feet of RODE" when they obviously mean ROPE. I consider the whole thing the rode and cringe again. I think people are afraid to say "rope" on a boat for fear of being corrected.

    What do you salty folks think? Maybe I am just too old fashioned?
  2. GhostriderIII

    GhostriderIII Senior Member

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    I had twin anchors on the last tug - each was 700kg which was attached to 400m of 60mm chain and that was attached to 700m of 30mm 7x42 teflon rope.
  3. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    I hate misuse of the language but then I ask myself "Does it really matter?" It doesn't. To put someone down because they misuse terms such as those above is really an attitude of showing one's intellectual superiority even when it's not at all intended to be. We listen, dismiss, teach where possible, ignore where we can.

    I don't think it's a matter of being old fashioned. It's just a matter of being extremely well educated in one field. That's where we have to understand others don't have the years in it we do.

    Think of something you're not very knowledgeable about and how you must sound to the professionals in that field. Think of seeing a doctor and you say, "I have a real pain right here" and you touch a part of your body. He then tells you the correct name for what you're experiencing. I remember when I was young taking my boat in for service and trying to imitate the sound the engine was making. I was amazed when the mechanic immediately told me the problem and fixed it.
  4. leeky

    leeky Senior Member

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    Correctly using standard phraseology makes communicating more efficient than not using it. Sometimes that's a big deal, like during a casualty, and sometimes it's just something to work around, like on a forum.
  5. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Rope is a cord or coil of fat string, not attached to anything, just sitting there collecting dust.
    Extra lines are in the "rope locker".
    Rode, Chain or nylon (hemp or other) is the working line attached to the anchor.
    Chain or other is a complete unit. 20 foot chain and 80 foot of nylon is 100 foot of rode.

    Working lines all have names based on what they do, Spring line for example.

    Old school had near hundreds names of each working line that you had to know all about.

    Glad I push a stinker.

    Anybody that pulls an anchor is a low ^&*()) and wrong term.

    If I remember correctly, lowering the anchor to set is called Laying the anchor.
  6. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Why would you need to weigh the anchor or weigh anchor? It usually says right on the side of the anchor, how much it weighs!!!
    :D:D:cool::cool::D:D

    (this is purely a joke btw.)
  7. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    A rope becomes a line when it has something to do. To unmoor, you bring the rode or hawser straight up an down, then you break the anchor, then you are aweigh and haul
  8. SeaLion

    SeaLion Senior Member

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    So I'll stop cringing if safety is not involved. Galley vs kitchen, for example. Then there's "passing" when one means "overtaking"...
  9. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    I've actually seen a trend of builders labeling rooms as they would in a home with Kitchen, Bedroom, and Bath and more.

    Unfortunately too, the word Galley has gotten a negative connotation as a style of kitchen. It's basically a kitchen with a narrow walkway through cabinets and equipment on both sides. Fortunately, the Galley's on most boats are no longer like that and they're more like regular kitchens.
  10. Oscarvan

    Oscarvan Senior Member

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    There is an element of re-enactment/historical preservation in all of this. The skills we still may have in line handling, navigation (not talking about slewing the cursor to a bar and hitting "GO" here), maneuvering, pride in maintenance and appearance all stem from a time when seafaring was THE lifeline of the economy, and the ships were a whole lot more complicated than what we do. Mariners were the sh1t. So to a point we keep traditions alive, and with that we use the proper terminology, or at least we try to, some of us.

    And, sometimes it even matters. Most people here are power boaters, but the sailors amongst us will agree that at night, doing a sail change, in crappy weather the difference between a topping lift, halyard, sheet, reefing line, clew, head, top, tack, bowline and luffing are not just fancyness. They are a matter of life and death.

    So, when a fellow mariner (boater?) tries to use proper terminology and pulls out his Chapman once in a while to fly a proper flag I appreciate that. It tells me he cares, and may actually have taken the time to learn a few things.

    Can you start the motors, take the ropes off, turn left out of the marina and drive to the Crab shack? Sure. Does it make me cringe a little inside?... yup.

    As far as the original question..... Yes, I weigh anchor and bring the rode on board..... line and chain and anchor. (Mostly chain in my case... but that's another story for another time....) Then again, when it's just me and the wife I may just "pull the hook"...... :D
  11. GhostriderIII

    GhostriderIII Senior Member

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  12. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Isn't a working line an imaginary charting line? Doesn't a working rope becomes a line, and the line name define its work purpose? Dunno
  13. Viceroy

    Viceroy Member

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    As I cast off for that very first time,
    The "rope" in my hand has now become "line".
    And hauling the sails to the top of the mast,
    That "rope", now a "halyard" holds strong, taught and fast.
    Then sailing in brisk winds full force on a beat.
    The sails are trimmed in by that "rope" that's a "sheet".
    And now at my anchorage with sails safely stowed,
    I trust in that "rope" that now serves as a "rode".
    Through all my life I will never lose hope,
    Of a reason or time to play with a rope.

    ....Anonymous Author....
    Cheers, Richard.
  14. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Well Done!
  15. Seasmaster

    Seasmaster Senior Member

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    If you haven't been hitting the grog, and want to impress landlubbers and scallywogs and pollywogs:

    "Heave anchor" is un-anchoringo_O
    Line is that fiber sh!t.
    Rope is that wire sh!t.

    If you have been sufficiently grogged, it's: anything you feel like calling it!
  16. Seasmaster

    Seasmaster Senior Member

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    I've been hooked up previously - but I was single.
  17. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    I thought it all began to go down hill, terms wise, when the expression " Burdened and Privileged" was changed. Why expect people to learn, just make it easy.......
  18. Seasmaster

    Seasmaster Senior Member

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    I dunno, my friend. AOC, Tlaib, and Omar would call me "privileged" and my two ex's would call me "burdened".
    Frankly, I like "give-way" and "stand-on"!! :D:);), but respect "old school", too.
  19. cleanslate

    cleanslate Member

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    I don't know , we always say lets "anchor".
    Ok, then we "lower "the anchor. Then "set "the anchor.
    Until it's time to "raise" the anchor and get under way. So i've always been used to three simple words lower -set -raise.
    We've never had the luxury of having chain for anchor" line", Lol.
    So we've always called it anchor line and 6 foot of chain Rode connected to the anchor.
    So yes I guess if you have all chain it would be considered Rode. That's kind of new to me. Good post btw.
    I think we all need to practice and keep up with the proper terminology and teach the newbies and new generation how to speak in nautical terms and not take the easy way out...which yes I am guilty of at times.

    Come to think of it I can't ever remember a time where I would use the term rope on a boat everything's a line such as dock lines , anchor line, spring line bow line, stern line, etc.

    I may use the term rope to hang fenders , Aid support for shore power cords and any other crap that might need a little help and support on board the boat.

    So I guess the whole line or chain for anchoring is considered Rode then.
  20. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    If you don't use rope, then what do you make the lines out of?

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