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Looking for a captain for a superyacht

Discussion in 'Yacht Captains' started by Championship, Oct 25, 2006.

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  1. The Reverend

    The Reverend New Member

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  2. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    The MCA probably has millions to spend enforcing things like this and needed a successful "hit" to continue to get the funding.

    The money and effort would be better spent looking at those who hold qualifications where their qualifying sea time is not always what they claim it to be and those who can pass the exams but shouldn't be serving in major positions of responsibility aboard.

    Yachting is a funny old thing. The need for qualifications is good in most respects, although it has caused the cost of owning and operating one to climb for sure. I and many of my colleagues agree that it has done little if anything to actually make it safer.
  3. The Reverend

    The Reverend New Member

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    Valid Points

    Some very valid comments there K1W1.

    I agree that this investigation was probably highlighted by the MCA as it had some newsworthy items in it (Facebook DNA testing etc) which in turn helps in bringing the attention of the MCA's work to the wider public.
    The MCA does do a lot of good work investigating fake certification which in general is not newsworthy.

    Your comments about verified/RELEVANT sea time and holding senior positions are spot on.

    I'm very familiar of a recent case where a qualified and generally well liked Captain was given command of a very large motor yacht. All his sea time had been gained on smaller sail boats (prior to qualification he had never even worked on a large motor yacht) , as a result he was totally out of his depth - incapable of safely and properly managing both the crew and yacht. Fortunately the incompetance was noticed by the owners management and dealt with before anyone was hurt.
    With the recent exponential growth of yachts I fear this is not an isolated case

    The two things that I think have greatly improved safety is the widespread use of ISM and the introduction of the STCW certificate for new crew, even though the course is generally not very good value for money it does help to give young people the right approach to safety onboard.
  4. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    This has to be one of the first instances of someone sailing on a forged ticket actually being brought to book.

    The original source was here: http://www.*****.com/news/allnews2001.asp

    On June 20, 2001, Philip Lawton Nicholas was convicted in the Cayman Islands Courts for possession and use of fraudulent British certificates to gain employment as engineer on a Cayman registered yacht, 'Shiralee'. The punishment was a fine or six months in prison. Mr. Nicholas paid the fine [fine was believed to be approximately $3,000] and was free to go. When a crewmember is engaged in a capacity for which he or she is not qualified, there is always a risk of endangerment to the vessel or to persons onboard. Whilst recognising these risks, the Cayman Islands inquiry into the loss of MY Shiralee has found no evidence of actual endangerment arising from the employment of Mr. Nicholas and so no specific charge was brought in this respect. However, anyone considering the use of fraudulent certificates should be warned not only of the risk of prosecution for endangerment but also the civil risks of misrepresentation in respect of his or her potential liability under contractual obligations operating variously between the owner, operator, insurer or mortgagee. These contracts may stipulate crew qualifications in addition to what is prescribed under the Merchant Shipping Law. Although Mr. Nicholas has shore qualifications and experience in engineering practice, and experience working in small commercial vessels, he currently possesses no valid maritime certificates. Upon questioning, he readily admitted his guilt and, much to his credit, has expressed a willingness to work to set the matter right. Nicholas having paid the price, both in the anxiety of waiting for a tap on the shoulder ever since the Shiralee was lost, and then the conviction itself, the Cayman administration has encouraged him now to enrol for the requisite training modules so as to get himself properly certified. From first-hand experience, he will then be able to explain to others the merits of doing things the right way. Peter Gibbs, Cayman Islands Shipping Registry

    As it looks like the auto editor has taken out the domain name from the link anyone that wants to know it can PM me for it.
  5. MYCaptainChris

    MYCaptainChris Senior Member

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    Was the owner/manager just being cheap or did they especially want this guy to run the yacht. I know of another yacht that is currently (or last I heard) in the same situation but it is simply because the management/owner will not pay the going rate.
  6. Garry Hartshorn

    Garry Hartshorn Senior Member

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    This is turning into an interesting discussion. For quite sometime I have been very concerned about the path that the industry is taking with qualifications and had the feeling that the process has been kidnapped by a few individuals who see it as a business opportunity. I do not believe that the seatime requirement is enough, I also do not believe that the subjects taught in the schools are in enough depth or cover a broad enough range to really qualify someone for the responsibly to which they will be charged, but if it were harder to achive the qualification then it would most likely be unviable for a commercial operation to be viable. I fear that the path that the industry is taking will foster a generation of yacht captains who through no fault of there own, are inexperienced, arrogant, dangerous and poorly prepared for a career at sea as a captain. In years gone by it took many years to climb the ladder now it seems like many expect to get to the top in just a few.
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I agree the salary is light and should be at least $1k per foot per year. But that is the norm for 50 feet and over nowadays. If I decided to go back to fulltime on one yacht, I wouldn't do it for less than $1200 per foot per year. And have been offered that a few times and still turned it down.
  8. Crunner

    Crunner New Member

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    Championship.. A job to stay clear of

    Unfortunately, a cheap approach to remuneration, and an inability to honor employment agreements and contracts, seems to be the normal practice for many positions based in this region.

    I have personal knowledge of the position offered by "Championship", and the company involved.

    The contract period that they require you to commit to is 3 years. The Local yacht managers will "talk a good line" and appear reasonable only until the new employee takes up the position. At that stage they will find that many of the conditions of employment and remuneration are suddenly changed without warning, and not in your favor.

    This position has a local reputation for being a difficult one. The last Captains couldnt leave there fast enough.

    The bottom line is that if you do not have local knowledge of this area, then use your network to ask around. Get all of the information that you can before starting, and do NOT sign any contract until at least 3 months have passed and you are satisfied that the contract will be honored.
  9. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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  10. Codger

    Codger YF Wisdom Dept.

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    Crunner makes a good point about having and using local knowledge, when doing business, anywhere.
    It is good practice to get the final contract in the local official language of whatever jurisdiction that contract will be adjudicated in if unfortunately it comes down to that. Hire your own translator.
    In some places there will be a requirement for two supposedly identical contracts to be signed. If there are any discrepancies between the two contracts, the one in the local legal language will be the one judged to be enforceable and the one in a foreign language will be regarded as existing only as a courtesy document.;)
  11. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    This applies in the west as well as elsewhere. I know of at least 1 mega yacht builder where this is the norm.
  12. toniknik

    toniknik New Member

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    Do you need a Crew

    I know that you are looking for a Captain. However how can I find out your needs for a crew? I need see time. how can I get in contact with you so that i can send you my resume?