Click for Llebroc Click for Abeking Click for JetForums Click for Westport Click for Lurssen

Living on a Yacht?

Discussion in 'Popular Yacht Topics' started by DragonRyu, May 11, 2006.

  1. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,302
    Location:
    Sweden
    Thanks Loren,
    She has some wooden pieces replaced, otherwise in original condition, also the gelcoat and interior. Can need some updates and varnish from time to time, but wears the years well!

    What I like is the interior and the ergonomics, everything is exactly in the right position with the right dimension. There is nothing that could have been better concieved within this hull. She displaces a good 7 tonnes and moves with grace through the sea which is also a measure of live onboard comfort.

    Galley is up in the wheelhouse so a light meal is easy prepared without leaving the helm or risking to be seasick by going below. There are inside and outside steerings and an autopilot as well.

    Down in the main salon you can sit 8 around the table, sleeps 3 with another 2 in the fore cabin and plenty of storage space everywhere.

    This picture is from the "High Coast" with over 200 m high islands and nice sandy beaches...

    Attached Files:

  2. buyerep

    buyerep New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Lighthouse point/Boston
    Ten years living aboard

    Hi DragonRyu,

    With the right vessel sized properly to your overall budget, living aboard
    can be a wonderful and viable option to living landlocked. I don't think that saving money should enter the equation however, although it can be cheaper to liveaboard if that is one's goal. More important considerations should be lifestyle and being closer to your living environment in a way that is wonderously different each and every day. Also, the concept of moving your house at will to various new, beautiful and exciting backyards is priceless!
  3. Alkor

    Alkor New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Toronto
    I know nothing about boats so if I am wrong please correct me.

    If one decides to live on a boat, as a substitute for a house, are there any additional fees? One has to pay for dock rent, insurance, maintenance, monthly payments for a boat regardless whether or not one lives on a boat. So where do additional costs come from?
  4. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,302
    Location:
    Sweden
    Some additional costs can be electricity, for all your gadgets and for heating or aircond, landline for telephone and computer if not wireless, sewage disposal and for water. All of this will often have a premium fee compared to your house.
  5. Alkor

    Alkor New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Toronto
    Well, if one does not live on a boat he/she has to pay for all of the above anyway. So you can't really count those as additional costs.
  6. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,302
    Location:
    Sweden
    You are absolutely right, but the premium charged in many ports can be twice (or more) the cost you have in your house...
  7. Talon

    Talon Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    Devon UK
    Don't do it if you hate being in confined areas for along time.
    This is a different story if were taking about yachts in excess of 100'.
    Platinum should do as a starting base!!:eek:

    If you have the chance to do this, then why not add it to your experience list.
  8. CaptTom

    CaptTom Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,937
    Location:
    Palm Beach to Ft Lauderdale
    Here's a thought and I'm not trying to be out of line or wanting to derail this thread. But DragonRyu posted his initial question back in May and we haven't hard from him. He also only has one post. Although this has been an informative thread and others may have gotten something from it, the original poster apparently asked the question then left. I don't understand that. He may be lurking and just reading replies, but an update from him on the comments shared or just to say where he is in the process would be good.
    I know this happens on every forum and site, but I frown when the poster doesn't reply.
    DragonRyu, are you out there? Give us an update.

    PS Thanks for letting me vent.
  9. SanDiegoAboard

    SanDiegoAboard New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    I just wanted to post that I did get a lot of help from all of you. I've been considering buying a yacht now for the past month (for liveaboard)...originally it was a houseboat, but after enough research and viewing, decided a yacht was better equipped for what my boyfriend and I had envisioned. It really tightened our budget when we started looking at yachts but I think in the long run, it will be worth it. We're still doing tons of research and learning as much as we can so that hopefully, within a year or two, we'll be ready for the big purchase! There is much to learn still, but the taxing, financing, insurance, and slip fees, we've got a GOOD grasp on!
  10. MaxResolution

    MaxResolution Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2007
    Messages:
    159
    Location:
    Little Rock
    Miles of Aisles

    I once paid for a trip to San Diego by taking stock photos of the boats in the harbor. My interest was primarily the buildings in the background. The issue became how to make less of that jumble of awful boats? Eventually, I found the high spots, so all those pitiful guy wires wouldn't interrupt the skyline.

    North of the University, in La Jolla, I found a bungalo selling for just $82,k. -WOW, just two blocks from the beach? What's wrong with this picture?

    Someone told me that this was 'the' sinkhole. Like; "the very worst place on earth you might choose to invest." Regardless, I wanted it badly, but not badly enough by signing day. The next morning it was gone.

    The moral of the story is that -if- I had bought that house, by now I could have bought 2 boats like Lars' sweet motor-sailer. And the wires, go figure what I ended up doing for a living...:(
  11. drlieven

    drlieven New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Bequia - Saint Vincent & The Grenadines
    "LIVING ON A YACHT" vs "Living in a House"

    Hi Everyone...

    The Original Post (by DragonRyu) "LIVING ON A YACHT" vs "Living in a House" definitely caught my interest, as it is a firm objective that my wife and I have decided upon.

    I sure appreciate the earlier made comments by everyone... as this is great Learning Material for us. And I do hope to get some further input from others (especially from those of you who have effectively "Done It" for a while - the livingaboard).

    There is a bit of background situation, which plays a major role in us considering this New OnTheWater LifeStyle.

    We have lived for the past 5 years in Portugal, and right on beach front. We spend almost every day a few hours, just walking on these beautiful beaches. But due to the cold water, we found ourselves hardly ever going in the sea to swim.

    So, we set out an objective to live in a place that had WARM water. We wanted a place, that we would be able to walk straight into the water without having to gasp for air. (or feeling like our heart stopped)

    Well, I am happy to share, that our wish has become reality, and for the past year, we have discovered and enjoy a whole new lifestyle.... we currently live on the little Island of Bequia (west of Barbados, just south of St. Vincent, north of Mustique).

    During the past year... we have enjoyed the amazingly moderate climate (88 to 92 F or 28 to 32 C degrees) and the water has almost consistantly been 28C (89F) or above. You can take a peek http://www.bequiatourism.com (we live in the home that is in the picture, between the word "BIG" and the word "LITTLE").

    When I now walk in the sea... the water surrounds me, like a silk piece of clothing.... just wonderful. And what's even better, is that Lower Bay (which is one of these prestine beaches, where occasionally magnificent MegaYachts drop by for a few days), where we now swim or hang out in the water on a daily basis for at least an hour or more... is 95% of the year, only occupied by 2 or 4 or 6 people only. We are still pinching ourselves... as we feel like we are living in a real dream paradise.

    We are not boating or sailing people of background, but now,... since we are looking down on Lower Bay and Princess Elisabeth Beach from our Porch and Kitchen windows... and on a daily basis we get to be amazed with the beautiful sailing ships and some of the most incredible motor yachts that gently stroll by... I guess you could say: "We have caught The Boating Bug".

    Now there is a number of other reasons, why we are considering "LIVING ON A YACHT" vs "Living in a House". A big one, is for sure, that, as we travel to the different Islands, they are each so uniquely precious, that it would be very hard to even decide which Island we would want to live on Permanently. Hence the idea of "Why Not Get To ENJOY THEM ALL". And have the flexibility to move around whenever we wish.

    From now having lived here on Bequia Island for a year, we already know that we DEFINITELY do not miss the Shopping Centers, The Museums, and especially the 6 line jam-packed HighWays (haha). On a recent trip to Miami, as we drove out of the airport, we also just realized on then... that we don't have STOP LIGHTS here on Bequia. A little detail that made us smile.

    Now... it seems obvious that MOVING to live on a Yacht, is probably NOT the best Solution for Cheap Living vs. living on land... but... the Biggest Difference Factor (at least for us) which seems to be in contrast with the majority of Yacht Owners (or people who lease a yacht for a few weeks)... is that for almost ALL, the yacht is a place for fun, pleasure and entertainement ONLY. (...and I can imagine that the list of joys is unlimited, indeed).

    But, for us... the main reason why we've justified even moving to such a little Island... is thanks to THE INTERNET. Yes, we enjoy this incredibly remote, barefoot, paradise, tropical kind of living... yet, on a daily basis, thanks to our ADSL connection, we can Communicate with the entire world. That means, I can do business, I can invest, and I can learn and teach, consult or be consulted... by anone, on any subject, anywhere in the world (and FROM anywhere in the world). So, it a great paradoxal combination.

    And THAT same paradox, we see in "LIVING ON A YACHT". Thanks to Broadband Satelite also available on any yacht (which still seems failry expensive - I was quoted $2000 per month for 2 Mb Bandwidth) at least, we can not only LIVE on the Yacht, but also WORK on the Yacht, and Manage Investments from the Yacht, and give or participate in Online Conference or Webinars from on board the Yacht.

    So, in as much as I am still trying to wrap my brain around "The Numbers" of justifying all the expenses of Living on a Yacht (and we are looking in the 65 Ft to 85 Ft range... so new it seems to range between $3 Million to $5 Million)... it becomes a totally different Economic Picture... because NOW I can not only enjoy the yacht, but I can also "Produce" on the Yacht.

    Whereas, it would be silly to having to "slave" 10-15 hours per day, in order to "pay the bills"... we have already become accustomed to working 2-4 hours per day (and they truly are enjoyable hours, I must say... or at least I really enjoy it) and having the rest of the day, to just enjoy life around us.

    And, believe me, since my back ground is running a busy Natural Health Practice in Belgium for about 20 years... our lifestyle today... without personel, without being cooked up in an office building, without the restrictions of set hours... feels like the contrast between HELL and HEAVEN.

    But, the amazing part is, that eventhough I was paid very well during my years of practice... now,... in much fewer hours and almost no responsibilities, we earn an net income way bigger and a level that we never enjoyed before.... all thanks to the internet.

    So... when we start adding all these factors together... (oh and I almost forgot another benefit: "that yaching folks also tell us that you don't have MOUSKITOS on the water" cause Bequia has plenty them little buggers)... that "LIVING ON A YACHT", not only seems EMOTIONALLY FULFILLING and perhaps even allowing an ECTASY LEVEL OF LIFE STYLE... but it seems to all add up to being very LOGICAL and PRACTICAL as well.

    One last note, that I would like to make (and I hope my writing do provoque some great replies from different people and different perspectives) is that we just visited the BOAT SHOW in Palm Beach (March 2007)... and friends... I must say... that I have never seen an interior of a Villa (and I have been visiting in some extremely beautiful homes throughout the years) with such an incredible combination of SO BEAUTIFUL combined with SO PRACTICAL, as in these different Motor Yachts (Azimut, Viking, Lazzara, Horizon, etc. etc.). They truly are MAGNIFICENT LITTLE PALACES on the water.

    In Closing... here is what one gentleman said at one of the Boat Show stands... he said: "Dr. Lieven... once you have found, the yacht that is really right for you (and yes... some people will sometimes go through owning 2 or 3, until they really find the one they totally feel-at-home in)... but once you have found that one... it will virtually be, AS IF YOU OWN YOUR OWN LITTLE ISLAND."

    Well to say the least.... that statement, has keep us inspired and dreaming.

    Thanks for letting me share... and please give me any practical (or even emotional) feedback or information or tips, that can help us make this Dream of Ours, into a crystal clear REALITY.

    Thank You...

    Lieven

    Attached Files:

  12. YachtForum

    YachtForum Publisher/Admin

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    1,316
    Location:
    South Florida
  13. drlieven

    drlieven New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Bequia - Saint Vincent & The Grenadines
    Hi CC Camper,

    I totally respect your comment, and I have no intention to recruit clients for my business through this forum (... I am sure that most people only want a yacht for relaxation and fun, and not to work on :cool: ).

    But, I am eager to connect with some people that have effectively experience of living longer terms (or are considering to live) on a yacht.

    Plus, the whole concept of considering a Yacht as an Estate or as a Real Estate Location (rather than only an Expense for Fun) is a fascinating financial and economic concept that intrigues me.

    And if there might be that exception out there, who also LOVES to work and play... than that will be a pleasant surprise.

    Thanks for keeping this Forum clean.

    Lieven
  14. BBJOE

    BBJOE New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Buenos Aires
    Researching concept...

    First let me thank you for the Yacht Forums and say that I've only just found your site and realize I'll be spending a lot of time in the various topics and threads soaking up all the great knowledge everyone is so generously offering.

    My wife and I live in South America - Buenos Aires to be exact. I've always had a facination about marinas, although somewhat fearful of the wide open sea. Regardless, my wife and I have begun thinking about one day moving off land to a yacht. We've lived in Boston, along the mid-atlantic coast line and even a short stint in Florida. As you can see we seem to be drawn to coastlines and the sea. My quest for more knowledge of yachting and the possibility of living for extended periods on a yacht (if not permanently) was a possibility. I've gathered some great information from the postings here, but have a couple of questions to start with in my post...

    1) Fuel Costs: this wasn't specifically mentioned. Was this included when mentioning operating costs of 10-20%? It seems to me that fuel would be a significant factor. At US$ 3 per gallon, event a midsized yacht with a tank capacity of 750 gallons would cost around 2250 dollars to fill.

    2) Fuel efficiency and green options: how many hours can one expect to get out of, say a 56 foot motor yacht? I guess I'm trying to figure out, how often I need to lay out the $2250. Also, trying to be environmentally friendly... is the boating industry coming out with any "greener" options?

    3) Learning and Licensing: I have never piloted a yacht. I imagine in would be a great mistake to run out, buy one, then find out on the water that I don't know what I'm doing. How can I learn to be this new "man of the sea" I envision myself being (hopefully) soon? Are there licensing requirements to "captain" a yacht?

    Finally...

    4) We have family in the US, South America and in Europe. Am I crazy for thinking that I could visit them all by water? Would I need to consider a minimum size motor yacht or trawler?

    Sorry, didn't want to leave a long post. Brief answers are fine, but detailed ones are very much appreciated.

    Thank you again.

    Big Brother Joe
  15. CODOG

    CODOG Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    399
    Location:
    Bournemouth, southern England
    :) Inspiration for those on a budget....

    Attached Files:

  16. Sea Bubble

    Sea Bubble New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    South Africa Hartebeespoortdam
    After having read all the posts regarding living on a yacht which I intent on doing as soon as my finances climb slowly...to buy that one of the many to come yachts.

    But a question has come up time after time after having read these posts. What occupations do these "Living on a yacht" have? I am an Architectural Technologist who would be able to work just by using the internet. I have enough clients or companies to work for by making contract drawings. I have noticed that being a Dr makes this lifestyle possible.

    Basically to some up what I'm asking is what is your occupation to be able to make a living from a yacht.

    Happy sailing...
  17. YachtForums

    YachtForums Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    19,909
    Location:
    South Florida
    Hi Sea Bubble,

    Generally, we don't discuss owners or their occupations on YachtForums, unless it is otherwise public knowledge and directly relevant to thread content. Their are plenty of places on the internet to learn how how high net worth people have made their money, but YF is not the place for this. We respect the privacy of our members.
  18. Sea Bubble

    Sea Bubble New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    South Africa Hartebeespoortdam
    Thnx for replying, sorry about the privacy, I honestly did not realise. Please remove my post as it is not applicable anymore (if you don't mind)

    Thank you
  19. BBJOE

    BBJOE New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Buenos Aires
    Than;ks to "dreamsfloatjoe" for the response. Since you posted the link the other day, I haven't been able to get an image of my wife and I on that yacht out of my head. One of the previous posts mentioned it may take exposure to a few different vessels to find the one that fits just right. I'm looking foward to the process as much as finding the right fit.

    Can anyone provide some feedback on my other three inquiries? I'll repeat them for ease of reading...

    1) Fuel Costs: this wasn't specifically mentioned. Was this included when mentioning operating costs of 10-20%? It seems to me that fuel would be a significant factor. At US$ 3 per gallon, event a midsized yacht with a tank capacity of 750 gallons would cost around 2250 dollars to fill.

    2) Fuel efficiency and green options: how many hours can one expect to get out of, say a 56 foot motor yacht? I guess I'm trying to figure out, how often I need to lay out the $2250. Also, trying to be environmentally friendly... is the boating industry coming out with any "greener" options?

    3) Learning and Licensing: I have never piloted a yacht. I imagine in would be a great mistake to run out, buy one, then find out on the water that I don't know what I'm doing. How can I learn to be this new "man of the sea" I envision myself being (hopefully) soon? Are there licensing requirements to "captain" a yacht?

    Thanks in advance to all for your guidance.
  20. PropBet

    PropBet Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,221
    Location:
    Is Everything!
    I'll take a stab at this. I'm not an expert, but have been on, in, and under water for quite some time. So, here are a few thoughts and comments.

    1) Fuel Costs: this wasn't specifically mentioned. Was this included when mentioning operating costs of 10-20%? It seems to me that fuel would be a significant factor. At US$ 3 per gallon, event a midsized yacht with a tank capacity of 750 gallons would cost around 2250 dollars to fill.

    By midsized yacht, me thinks you are talking about something in the 50' range, and by 750g, this would possibly fit in this rage. This is of course if you are figuring this equation on a motor yacht, versus, say, a sailing yacht.
    The answer to this question really sits with you. Meaning, you are really the best to answer how often you will see a 2500 / fill event. How much are you under way? When under way, how far are you going? Your yacht? It's efficiency? GPH @ cruise speed? Distance @ cruise? etc. So, for some, who want / enjoy the travel of being under way and visiting different locations, then the answer would be quite frequently. For me, I'd be happy to see it once a month. But I may get ambitious and have to see it once a week.


    2) Fuel efficiency and green options: how many hours can one expect to get out of, say a 56 foot motor yacht? I guess I'm trying to figure out, how often I need to lay out the $2250. Also, trying to be environmentally friendly... is the boating industry coming out with any "greener" options?

    Some of the above questions / comments apply here as well with regards to the number of how far / often. As far as green, about as green as you can get is obviously going to be with sail, which (rarely) requires you to be running an engine while underway, or 'sailing' if you will. As far as greener options coming up in the future, as we all read in staying educated in where the market(s) and industry is going, obviously efficiency drives this and is a major factor. Two different boats, but one burns 2X the fuel as the other is not a hard purchase decision.


    3) Learning and Licensing: I have never piloted a yacht. I imagine in would be a great mistake to run out, buy one, then find out on the water that I don't know what I'm doing. How can I learn to be this new "man of the sea" I envision myself being (hopefully) soon? Are there licensing requirements to "captain" a yacht?

    You have a wonderful learning experience in front of you if this is the case. And in this process, you will likely learn quite a bit about what you like and dislike about different boats, sail and motor alike, size, options, features, (or lack there of) and this will lend great experience when it comes time to buy a yacht for yourself. IMO, I'd lean towards getting all of your training, before you purchase anything. Hence- part of the education process.
    To answer your question, yes, you can head on out and buy any yacht you want. Cash is always King. Operating your yacht however is a different story. At least operating it, if you choose to have the vessel insured, which of course, it will be.
    You will need particular credentials, training, and experience to operate your yacht, if you are going to insure it. If you choose to have a hired captain, then operating it is no problem with him at the controls. The insurance company wants to know there is a competent person at the helm. So, yes, there are captain's requirements for operating your yacht. Not owning, but operating. These are primarily driven by the insurance of the vessel / yacht / boat.

    As far as that education process, there are many reputable schools for training. US Based, and elsewhere. Best would be to google a few searches to find something local, visit their facility and start the initial communication process of understanding "training to be a captain of my very own (insert clever yacht name here)" Talk to instructors, other captains, get referrals from your local marina or harbour master, etc. Speak with them, and understand the education process, and decide from there where / which path you wish to pursue and which school, best fits your needs, requirements, and desires.

    And after taking all of that into consideration- spend as much time as you can on the water and decide if you want to live aboard.

    At the end of the day, it's a lifestyle for some, however not for others.