Click for Apolonnian Click for Cross Click for Abeking Click for CL Yachts Click for Westport

Halon fire extinguisher??

Discussion in 'Technical Discussion' started by junglejim, Jun 5, 2008.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. junglejim

    junglejim New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    UK
    Hey all, one more quick question. I am working a motorcruiser in Ibiza. There is a Halon engine room extinguisher which is out of service by a few years.

    I know Halon is no longer permissible, but I need some advice.

    The owner has been told that the replacement system will cost £10,000. He has checked his insurance documents and the only requirement is for an engine room fire detector.

    What the heck do I do here as he is saying the fire detector is fine and not keen on servicing the extinguisher system due to cost.

    Can you service a halon system without having it replaced?

    Any suggestions appreciated.

    Thanks
  2. Ken Bracewell

    Ken Bracewell Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,536
    Location:
    Somewhere Sunny
    I'm pretty sure you can still buy halon. Call the local fire guys.
  3. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,384
    Location:
    My Office

    Hi,

    I think you will find this is restricted to Military and Government vessels these days.

    Depending upon the boat and system age etc you might not need to change the whole system for survey, a fixed Halon system inspection was just a level/pressure check plus a visual of the system pipes/actuators etc.

    Here is the Canadian version of the story ( just for you Ken):)

    http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/bulletins/2004/01-eng.htm
  4. Ken Bracewell

    Ken Bracewell Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,536
    Location:
    Somewhere Sunny
    I mis-read the initial post.
    Halon systems can still be inspected and maintained. The link K1W1 posted even says it can be refilled until 2010 so long as the system is replaced within 1 year.
    The last time I discharged one was about 8 years ago and we had to drive several hours to find a refill facility.
  5. junglejim

    junglejim New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    UK
  6. YachtForums

    YachtForums Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    19,906
    Location:
    South Florida
    This thread has been moved to the Technical Discussion forum.
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    13,885
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Also, every 5 years the Halon bottle has to be removed from the vessel and hydrostatically tested. I haven't had any issues having them serviced here in the US.
  8. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,384
    Location:
    My Office

    Hi,

    Maybe not yet but you will in the not too distant future.

    The US EPA has something to say about it as well.

    http://www.epa.gov/EPA-AIR/1998/March/Day-05/a5720.htm

    I also found the text below on this site http://floridamaritimelawyer.clarislaw.com

    What happened to Halon on yachts?

    Category: Boat, Ship and Marina Fires

    If you think those far off international treaties don't affect you, you are wrong.

    Halon fire fighting systems were a welcome addition to the recreational boating industry when they were first introduced. They extinguished engine room fires while saving the lives of the passengers on board. That all changed beginning in 1994.

    The Montreal Protocol on ozone depleting substances was passed in 1987. The protocol was administered by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which maintained a list of ozone-depleting substances which included Halon. In the United States, the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 implemented the provisions of the Montreal Protocol into U.S. law. Under the Act the production of Halon ceased on January 1, 1994.

    In Europe, EC Regulation 2037/2000 went into effect on October 1, 2000. It provided that new halon could not be used to refill existing systems; that recovered, recycled or reclaimed halon could only be used in existing systems until December 31, 2002; and that after that date no refilling could take place. Mandatory decommissioning of halon fire extinguishing systems had to be completed before December 31, 2003. Consequently yachts registered in European nations have had to scrap their systems altoghether or have them systems replaced.

    U.S. yachts continue to use recycled Halon. However, it has become progressively more expensive and to date no one has discovered a simple and inexpensive alternative which can be "dropped-in" to existing Halon systems. Many boats owners are simply discontinuing use of the systems, which are not required, and taking the risk that in the event of a fire they can extinguish it will portable CO2, dry chemical or more recently AFFF (aqueous foam) extinguishers.

    Most US shipowners moved from halon to CO2 for their engine room protection for new ships. Existing ships with halon systems installed continue to use recycled/reclaimed halon to recharge the systems which are discharged, or which need to be topped off.

    Inert gas systems, like nitrogen or nitrogen/argon systems require large cylinders under high pressure to supply the gas.

    CO2 and HFC-125 systems were supposed to replace Halon but they may be on the way out as well. The Kyoto Protocol was adopted without the participation of the United States on December 10, 1997. It committed the countries which signed to reductions in the release of Global Warming Gases which included CO2 and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).

    February 08, 2006

    By Rod Sullivan

    TrackBack (0)
    Halon Systems

    Category: Boat, Ship and Marina Fires

    Most US shipowners moved from halon to CO2 for their engine room protection for new ships. Existing ships with halon systems installed continue to use recycled/reclaimed halon to recharge the systems which are discharged, or which need to be topped off.

    Inert gas systems, like nitrogen or nitrogen/argon systems require large cylinders under high pressure to supply the gas.
  9. TSI AV

    TSI AV Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    104
    Location:
    Estonia
  10. GrahamF

    GrahamF Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    537
    Location:
    Palma Spain/ South Africa
    Hi

    We had to remove Halon system on a 68' Ferretti. There was a deadline date from what i can remember. We had to pay for the removal and destruction of the Halon as it was sent somewhere to Mainland Spain. I will advice your boss that he will need to install a new system. I will try and find out from a safety company here what the rules are and the possible fines. When we removed ours there were several other boats that did the same as we were warned that if the Guardia Civil makes spot inspection and they find Halon on board then the vessel will be chained to the dock until the new systems was installed and there would be a fine as well. I will be a little worried if my boss says that he does not want to upgrade his engine room fire system. Does he not care about your, his and his guest’s safety?
  11. The Reverend

    The Reverend New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2007
    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    La Paz Mexico
    On the large yachts (Red Ensign and European) Halon was replaced a few years ago usually with Hi-Fog , CO2. or FM200
    It is still possible to get Halon although I doubt if it is legal in Europe.

    I would question your owners idea that only fire detection needs to be fitted, surely a condition of the insurance is that the firefighting capability has to be maintained. I would certainly not want to sail on a yacht that has had its firefighting system compromised or removed.

    I don't know what size yacht you are talking about and I know £10,000 is a lot of money but when it comes to peoples lives and the value of the yacht it is nothing.