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Feadship Utopia Design

Discussion in 'Yacht Designers Discussion' started by KCook, Jan 29, 2006.

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  1. KCook

    KCook Senior Member

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    The Utopia look, with an array of vertical windows curving around the face of each deck, has certainly become popular. Questions: Was Feadship the first with this style? If this style does "belong" to Feadship, and it can't be considered "Feadship classic", what label do we give it?

    [​IMG]

    Kelly Cook
  2. YachtForums

    YachtForums Administrator

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    Kelly,

    This post has been moved to the designers discussion forum. I believe this is a better place to pose the above questions. Thanks!

    Carl
  3. taksan

    taksan New Member

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    This style was first seen in two Bannenburg yachts built in Japan at Sterling in the mid 1980's (sort of). The first yacht that was very similar was Leander and the first Fedship (which Utopia was based on) to feature this was Wedge Two. The rest of Utopia was basicaly a enlarged version of Keith McCaws previous yacht the Feadship Katrion.(first one). Utopia is a loverly boat but is a bit "small" for a 235 footer epsecialy in the guest accomodation which is a function of DeVries's inability to build a boat with more beam or draft due ot their location.
  4. KCook

    KCook Senior Member

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  5. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Kelly, I can´t help but thinking of a whale, so why don´t we call it the Mobydick style?

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  6. YachtForums

    YachtForums Administrator

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    What's unusual about Leander is the old-fashioned canoe stern, coupled with the semi-current round window trend. Combined... these elements are most reminiscent of a "wedding cake", a term with a specifically negative connotation in yachting, because it relates to a yacht having too many layers, or being too tall. That's NOT the case with Leander, however Wedge II and Utopia have been referred to as wedding cake yachts.

    As noted, I think the Bannenberg designed Sterling's were the first use this design, which is over 20 years old now, but I believe the first Feadship to use these windows was Jim *****'s 1995 "Gallant Lady"?
  7. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    The Bannenberg designs were different. Not from above, but from the side the windows were not oversized and seemingly unprotected as in the yachts by Kusch and Feadship. It makes a big difference in overall appearance I think...

    Here is the Bannenberg original Southern Cross III from 1986.

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  8. KCook

    KCook Senior Member

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    Thanks for showing us Southern Cross III Lars. So this was the first yacht with the arching window wall fronting the main deck? '86 pre-dates Leander, right?

    Sorry I am not up to speed on the chronology of yacht design. This discussion is very helpful to me.

    Kelly
  9. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    This was one of the early Bannenberg designs with this kind of style, but it has been used the last hundred years.

    Leander, Wedge Too and Utopia are a few examples of yachts with another style where the first ondeck windows are higher and not part of the wheelhouse as in Bannenbergs and most of the older designs.
  10. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Outside of the design of the Utopia's windows...For some reason, at times she looks top heavy and other times she does not. From some angles she looks well proportioned...from others she does not? How could we account for this?
  11. Neil Rooney

    Neil Rooney Senior Member

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    Take a look at Starship, ex Almaviva, a 1988 Van Mill with the dining salon near the bow with the "curved" front below the bridge.
  12. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    Another yacht that uses these windows you all are talkign about is the new Benetti Galaxy!
  13. tartanski

    tartanski Member

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    Why don't we call it the Architectural style, after all Bannenberg pioneered the use of glued structural glass in this type of design which he quite obviously took from his days as an architect
  14. Teenna

    Teenna New Member

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    A 1998 Palmer Johnson "La Baronessa" re-named "Frequency"...sitting somewhere in Turkey as far as I know, as a goverment property.

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  15. Teenna

    Teenna New Member

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    Easy answer. Problem lies in the width of the channel to reach the sea from the shipyard, dramatically reducing the maximum beam of Utopia to the traditional 10.80m. Due to this also her price was Utopic. I wonder about the stability. And this answers also your angle problem. Side view-ok, front view-drama.
  16. MaxResolution

    MaxResolution Senior Member

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    Wedding Cake

    To me she looks proud and regal. But, without the dramatic bow it would be a complete failure. All up, this is a classic statement in design and it does deserve a contextual 'anchor.' ...At the Maritime Museum.

    Architecturally, it reminds me of the 40's SoCal modernist movement. Robert Schlinder meets Admiralty. The key lines dramatize the fore-deck areas while the cabins play subtle little tricks of proportion. Add a few bold portholes, and it would make a superlative restaurant on Hollywood Blvd. (Valet parking, just $10.)

    "I'll have the grilled Mako shark, but hold the dessert, -pleeeese!"
  17. yotphix

    yotphix New Member

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    Max you truly are a funny nut!