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Dashew's Offshore PowerBoat Development, FPB Expedition Yacht

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by brian eiland, Jan 7, 2009.

  1. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    I was sure I had seen on this forum a number of discussions about this unique new vessel, and now a series of vessels to come based upon this design. But when I did a search for FPB or Dashew in the 'titles' vein I did not come up with anything.

    I did come up with these two:
    NEW: Kelly Archer 83' Expedition Yacht
    Kelly Archer 83' Expedition Yacht


    _________________________________________________
    I thought it deserved its own subject thread in the general discussions. And I'll start it out with some interesting videos of this vessel in action:

    http://dashewoffshore.smugmug.com/gallery/6802329_jB96x#434939709_9pkLM-A-LB

    http://dashewoffshore.smugmug.com/gallery/6802329_jB96x#435385653_PzJDW-A-LB


    FPB Cruising
    These videos will give you a feel for how the FPB Series handle various wind and wave conditions. The first half of the crossing from New Zealand to Fiji and the North Atlantic passage will show you Wind Horse in waves generated by strong gale force winds. You will find good surfing footage in the second half of the New Zealand to Fiji and California to Panama video. The last videos cover the design process we go through in a new project including historical footage, tank test data, CFD analysis, and the heavy weather design logic which is the foundation for all our designs. The rest of the videos will give you a glimpse of the cruising life, FPB style.


    Trip to Panama
    http://dashewoffshore.smugmug.com/gallery/6802329_jB96x#435385653_PzJDW

    Bahamas to Nova Scotia
    http://dashewoffshore.smugmug.com/gallery/6802329_jB96x#435202827_m5uCv-A-LB

    North Atlantic - Greenland to Ireland with a compression gale
    http://dashewoffshore.smugmug.com/gallery/6802329_jB96x#435343048_3eVXd-A-LB
  2. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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    Dashew Web Site

    If you are going to talk about the Dashew FPB, then you absolutely need to have this site as well - http://www.setsail.com/dashew/do_PARADIGM.html. Here the Dashews have every conceivable bit of information relating to the design philosophy of the 83 and their new, smaller 64 foot version which is currently developed and built for some very lucky customers. They include detailed information and tons of photographs about equipment choices and equipment reviews after putting many thousands of miles on the boat. There are travel stories covering the boat from the launch and shakedown in New Zealand to their travels in Alaska and Mexico, and on to their most recent landfall in England after transiting the North Atlantic chasing icebergs. The photos from their travels are beautiful.
  3. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Passagemaker Magazine article, Nov-Dec 2008

    This issue of the magazine had two good articles on 'cruising vessels':
    1) a 12 page article on Motorsailers, and
    2) an 11 page article on Dashew's 'Wind Horse' after 35,000 miles



    **(for the other text and reference link sites in this letter ,
    see this posting
    )
  4. VikHatBer

    VikHatBer New Member

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    How might the handling characteristics of this cruiser differ from a heavy, full draft trawler with a wider beam when going over those big rollers?
  5. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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    FPB Handling

    The Dashews like to keep the bow light when underway by shifting fuel and water around although the bow is designed to essentially be a void holding lines and fenders. They have described in their voyages "surfing" over waves with the new 83 footer. If you visit the site I suggested above, Steve D. has explained the philosophy and design and written about their real-world experiences backing up projections.

    See http://www.setsail.com/dashew/do_PARADIGM.html and check out the section titled Hull Shape & Pitching under Design Objectives. The Passages section is a collection of blog-type entries and wonderful photos. If I remember correctly, you should find more info about the hull shape and its performance here, too, but there are a lot of entries. Each one is worth the reading time though, IMHO.

    Another interesting note is that the first vessel, the 83, has a number of sensors installed so the Dashews could collect data on the forces exerted on the vessel as they cruised. This information has gone into the design of the new, smaller 64 foot vessel they are offering for sale.
  6. SAB

    SAB New Member

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    I'd happily cross the Atlantic in one of these as against a standard Trawler Yacht any day! It's a design well proven in the greatest test tank of all.
  7. Kruse

    Kruse Member

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    Dashew FPB

    Fully agree with SAB here.
    I have been following the development of this new type of boat from the start, the Dashew FPB.:D
    The boat has taken clues from their well acclaimed circumnavigating sailboats.
    The smooth efficient body, slim sterns (to remain steerable in following seas), sharp entry to make a smooth ride uphill, large rudder and fins to have good steering when going slow or in waves and current.
    Everything seem to be very well balanced, assuring a comfortable travel.
    The boats, especially the new 64, is very very strongly build, designed to take hits from those big blue waves. Is self righting and designed to glide down that monster wall of water bow first.
    The development of those boats has obviously been taken very seriously.
    They are designed as you would yourself, if you could.
    All of their extensive blue water experience has been incorporated into this project. I sincerely believe this is as good as it gets.
    Going into deep waters, I believe you should be on as strong and safe a platform as you can get. Preferably a comfortable one too.
    This boat (64) has a smooth ride, also in heavier seas. It is easy to maintain, has a very long range of 7000+ real miles: all including barnacles, wind/waves/current, generator, AC, and hydraulics (/11000 salesman-miles: engine only, smooth water).
    Its hard not to fall in love with this boat.
    I can strongly recommend to take a look at their site.
    http://www.setsail.com
    The FPB64? go to Dashew off shore - FPB as noted in previous posts.
    That site is full of knowledge learned the hard way.
  8. Fishtigua

    Fishtigua Senior Member

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    Kruse,
    Right on the button, lessons learned under sail transfer well to cruising powerboats too.

    Long, thin boats are easily driven and take the weather well but they roll like hell. The Dashew's have fitted birds (outrigger planes) and I've had some fun with these over the years on commercial fishing boats.

    In rough seas both birds are set for stability but in a light chop most often you run with just one in the water to windward to save fuel due to drag. Imagine picking-up the dead bird while rolling side to side, its like playing Darts with an anvil swinging at you. :eek:

    Still love the boat, I've been thinking of something along these lines for ages.

    Fish
  9. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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    Dashews Like Their Active Stabilizers

    Don't forget that the Dashews spent a lot of time analyzing the hull before and after the build to prevent and dampen roll. In the section titled Active Stabilizers - http://www.setsail.com/dashew/Stabilization.html, they detail their decision to use active hydraulic stabilizers and chose to install a set larger than the usually suggested. "The question of stabilizer size was next. Using normal industry criteria and our cruising speed of 11.5 knots, we could have gotten away with stabilizers as small as 4.5 square feet (0.4 square meters). However, these would only be adequate for that speed with small waves. Bigger waves, and the slower speed required in them, would leave us wanting for stabilizer capacity. After looking at our CFD data, and allowing for some gut instinct, we went for 12-square-foot foils - almost three times the norm."

    In a review of the boat and systems at the vessel's first aniversary, they said, "Our NAIAD active stabilizers are one of the most important of these new systems. We really did not want to fit this gear because of the complex hydraulic system, but we're very happy we did. The oversized fins were the right way to go. The system does not work very hard, and even in 20+ foot (6m) beam seas, average roll is 3 to 4 degrees.[Emphasis added]" - http://www.setsail.com/dashew/HowsItGoing_summer06.html
  10. Kruse

    Kruse Member

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    There has been a few updates on the build of the FPB 64 series.
    Coming along nicely:D
    Absolutely worth the effort to look through these pages
    http://www.setsail.com/dashew/do_PARADIGM.html
    The FPB 64 may very well be the perfect small or no crew circumnavigator
  11. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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  12. Loren Schweizer

    Loren Schweizer YF Associate Writer

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    "The Dashews like to keep the bow light when underway by shifting fuel and water around although the bow is designed to essentially be a void holding lines and fenders...." wrote 'round the horn.

    This isn't surprising, given the Dashew's extensive sailing background. Serious offshore sailors, especially racers for whom every tiny gain in efficiency is as important as that first rum back at the dock, will tell you that keeping weight out of the ends of the boat is paramount. A reduced polar moment of inertia results in less pitching, hence a faster traverse over the water.
  13. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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  14. Kruse

    Kruse Member

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    Launch of the first of the FPS64's

    Resurrecting this thread because the first of the new FPB's; the 64, is now starting its sea-trials.
    Absolutely worth a look.
    This would be my choice for a long-range/circumnavigater for a small family or a couple looking for true adventure.
    Have been following the developments by the Dashews for many years.
    Their approach to safety and usability is inspiring confidence.
    Check out ww.setsail.com ;)
  15. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    Thanks Kruse, ...better link reference HERE
    http://setsail.com/category/fpb-updates/
  16. vlafrank

    vlafrank Senior Member

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    OK, so what's it all mean?

    Does this mean that my long range expedition (trawler-type) yacht lust is now obsolete? Has the high bow, traditional wave smasher just been relegated to the status of the Model T and the open cockpit bi-plane? Watching these videos makes me feel like an old man. Wait a minute - I am an old man! When I see crab boats and tuna boats ("Most dangerous catch") made like this, then I'll know that Darwin has truly struck again, and this time very close to home. Ack! Ack!

    In the meantime, does anyone have the phone number for Nordhavn?

    Just kiddin', just kiddin'......:rolleyes:
  17. Highlander

    Highlander New Member

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    First FPB

    The boat is named AVATAR. Is there a connection to the movie?

    I wonder how many 64's they will build?
  18. Kruse

    Kruse Member

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    Updates

    Some very dramatic pics in the final sea trial of Avatar (First FPB launched).
    Screen-Saver material.
    This boat is getting wet.
    Absolutely worth your time to have a look-see.
    http://setsail.com/category/fpb-64-sea-trials/
    I know I am a fan-boy but I think you will all enjoy those photos.:D
  19. Loren Schweizer

    Loren Schweizer YF Associate Writer

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    Never thought I'd see any boat wetter than a Bertram 31.
  20. 'RoundTheHorn

    'RoundTheHorn Senior Member

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    Bigger FPB on the way

    Steve and Linda Dashew have their creative juices flowing again with a 112 foot FPB design. Preliminary comments and a drawing are out with details to come after the new year. http://setsail.com/fpb-112/

    Attached Files: