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Carver 355 impeller change

Discussion in 'Carver Yacht' started by n36511, Dec 15, 2013.

  1. n36511

    n36511 New Member

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    Lake Lanier, GA
    Went to change the impeller on my Carver 355 Starboard 454 XL and cant seem to find a way to access it. The clearance is just too tight to fit myself in there. Any of you have experience on a 355 changing the impeller on the starboard engine?

    As always, thanks for the help!
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    I've had some very large mechanics over the years and it amazed me how they were able to get everywhere. Thought I'd have to get them out with grease and ropes on more than a few occassions. I think you'll find the right tools and a mirror will do you a world of good. Don't be afraid to disconnect whatever may be in your way.

    P.S. I once got myself stuck on the outboard side of the motor on a 46 Sea Ray, and claustrophobia set in. Thought someone would one day find my skeleton there. Eventually I took some slow breaths, imaginined myself a snake and slithered myself backwards and out. Generally I'd rather pay someone else to do those jobs. It's why they get the big bucks. But an impellor has me curious. What's blocking you? That's pretty straight forward usually.
  3. n36511

    n36511 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I have done a number of impeller swaps in my past, however the forward part of the engine seems like it is almost impossible to access. The port engine is easy to get to though.
  4. RB480

    RB480 Senior Member

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    Always been done through the starboard side hatch in the salon floor. Lift it up and lay on the top of the motor worst case.
  5. n36511

    n36511 New Member

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    Thanks for the response. Yeah that was what I was afraid of. Very little clearance between the motor and the hatch supports. I will be hanging upside down :). Good experience though in case I have to change one out while away from dock.
  6. seldomdry

    seldomdry Member

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    Location:
    Stillwater MN
    Had mine done by my small body mechanic, as my 245lb torso will not fit. He removed the fire bottle and squeezed in between the Genny and bulkhead, layed on his side and changed it out along with the fuel filter that is also impossible to access. Good luck....
  7. nomad69

    nomad69 Member

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    When it came time to drain the block a couple of weeks ago I noticed the same delima. No way was I going to squeeze myself in that little crack to get in front of the engine block to reach the drain plugs. So I did what every captain thinks about doing. I said "Hey Honey, come here a minute. Do you think you could squeeze in there for me and ..........";). A usual the admiral saved the day.
  8. Phillip J

    Phillip J Member

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    This is a big dilemma, Get stuck, lay over the engine and strain forward, or pay a mechanic. I've done all three and scraped a lot of knuckles. Depending on how far forward your genny is placed, you can squeeze in, but I've been partaking too much in summer sandbar libations to do that anymore. I can't hang over the engine and work with a mirror for ****. My Advice, Hire the skinny mechanic you trust.
  9. nomad69

    nomad69 Member

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    Seeing how the admiral is co-owner, she's the obvious choice to fit down in the bilge. It's just not made for a Big guy to squeeze into.
  10. nomad69

    nomad69 Member

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    image.jpg

    Here is the admiral hard at work
  11. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    ROFLMAO. You've got to give us lessons. When I met my bride she used to clean the spokes on my Triumph with a toothbrush. After we got married I got mags because she told me to clean my own d---ed spokes.:D I can't get her to run the lawn tractor much less go into an engine room.:rolleyes:
  12. n36511

    n36511 New Member

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    Thanks for the responses. It looks like there is more clearance with your mercruiser engines than are with my crusaders. I can just see it now.... I am able to wedge myself down in there but then realize I don't have all of the parts I need :) I will probably just get a mechanic. Sucks to know that in a bind...I prob would end up needing a tow if it needed to be replaced while away from dock.
  13. Monepit

    Monepit Member

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    You think that's bad, I had a 355 with cummins deisels. Talk about tight. Our 450 is a dream to work on. I had the boat for 5 years and never changed the port impeller. I'm a maintaince nut but the idea of changing that thing out before it failed was not appealing. I chose option 4. sell the boat and get a new one. The 355 was a great boat but I sure don't miss those days.
  14. n36511

    n36511 New Member

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    access

    To paint the picture a little clearer.... this is the only opening I have to access the front of the engine.

    engine.JPG

    engine2.JPG
  15. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I never understand why people buy boats where routine maintenance is a problem...
  16. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Because they look at the salon, not the engine room when shopping.
  17. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    And the drink holders, flat screens, fancy LEDs, gold plated badges... :)

    It s always driven me nuts how when a broker shows you a boat how they always highlight the gadgets! Every time I ve looked at a boat for sale, whether for me personally or as a captain for a client, the first place I go to is the ER. Then the lazarette and whatever bilge compartment i can open. Brokers hate that. :)
  18. n36511

    n36511 New Member

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    I have thick skin and can take the jabs....but I knew this was an issue when I bought it. I have owned various boats over the last 25 years of my life and have spent much time in the workings of a boat. Not an expert, but not a newbie. I have actually spent much time reading thru your website looking for things to lookout for and I respect your survey work. The logic behind buying it was the price tag. Couldnt walk away from the price. And not only that.... the previous owner had put new stainless steel cupholders in it.... I was sold as soon as I saw them!
  19. Monepit

    Monepit Member

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    I'm with you there. My 355 was a fast, efficient, comfortable boat. Yes, a pita to work on. My 450 voyager is more comfortable, a little slower, cost's more than twice as much and uses twice the fuel. I love it but the 355 was a great boat for that time in my life.
  20. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    I am with you on that one Pascal but the word "buy" should be changed to build.

    The accessibility for maintenance is one of the single biggest battles I have when doing specs and supervision of new build yachts.

    I try to convey the message that as we are all humans we naturally don't like things where we get hurt or beaten up unneccessarily.

    If doing a job is going to mean cuts and pain for the person doing it the chances of it being done as schedlued and as well as it should are seriously restricted most like the space the job is in.

    Often on these projects in order to achieve a satisfactory result without loss of face to everyone the political cap needs to be donned at the outset and the coveralls saved for when diplomacy fails.