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Bimini is a ghost town...

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by Pascal, Mar 12, 2009.

  1. dennismc

    dennismc Senior Member

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    Would be nice to now when America lost her "innocence" so to speak, those were fab times, life was fun, people really enjoyed adventure and travel, now it's all **** regulations and Gov't interference in the fun, and that means all levels of Gov't not just the Feds. Seems the elected just want to suck the energy and lifeblood out of the population.
    My 2c.
  2. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    Great stories and great pictures Brian.

    Makes me even sadder about what has become of Bimini.
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    That's Socialists at their best. Tax on this, tax on that, can't do this, can't do that. Slowly and slowly, they sneak in a new tax here, a new tax there, a new law here. Obama is trying to push through an additional 41 cents fuel tax on all types of fuel.
  4. VikHatBer

    VikHatBer New Member

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    +100...

    But lets not stray off topic, this is a great thread.
  5. stevenpet

    stevenpet New Member

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    Thanks Brian for sharing your story. I loved hearing about your adventures of youth. A few days later I came across an old book written by another young man about his adventures at sea. Your story inspired me to read it. Errol Flynn’s book, Beam Ends is about summer at sea while sailing up the coast of Australia in the early 1930s aboard a sailboat that was already over 50 years old when he bought it. It’s purely a man’s tale of drinking too much, endlessly hitting on women, bar room fights, stealing food to curb their hunger and the adventures of a wrestles sea. I loved the story so much that I’m now rereading it to my son.

    I suspect that every passing generation morns the “death” of their memories and experiences. I for one mourn the loss of the endless summer nights of my childhood playing yard games with all the neighbor kids. It seems that today’s generation spends all their time in doors in front of the TV, computer or gaming consoles and view the games of pomp, sardines, and kick-the-can as quant but boring games of their parents. I suppose I can see where they are coming from since even though my step-father bought me Lincoln Logs and a very large Erector set, my preferred toy was for Lego’s…which I vowed I would NEVER grow tired of.

    One of my fondest memories of youth was hiking through Maui’s Haliakala crater with a group of teens in a youth rehab program where I was cast in the role as their fearless adult leader at the tender age of 22. Our washing machine broke so none of our clothes were properly rinsed, which caused profuse streams of soap suds to run down our legs the entire time we were in the misty volcano caldera. They were teaching me the lyrics to the Violent Femme’s song, Blister In The Sun, which we were singing full throttle in nature’s amazing amphitheatre. In the fog, we hiked up a ridge of switchbacks where, just upon reaching the top, we were above the clouds. On each side of use were steep cliffs dropping into the clouds. Above use was nothing but brilliant blue sky and far out beyond the clouds was the vast Pacific Ocean. The only land we could see was about 10 feet wide by 30 feet long and nothing else but sky, clouds and the ocean off in the distance and 10,000 feet below. All of us completely stopped talking and just stood there amazed at what an incredible sight we were seeing. For me, it was one of the most amazing experiences of my life. Being there with people that I cared about and cared about me, in this celebration of life, in this most amazing and awe inspiring place will always inspire me. It had nothing to do with taxes, government, the Feds or those **** Republicans. It just had to do with a group of young men experiencing friendship and nature without a care in the world.

    Thank you Brain for sharing your story with us. I sincerely hope that every generation finds its “moment in the sun” where they can honestly say I AM ALIVE! I HAVE LOVED! I HAVE MOURNED! and I HAVE LIVED!

    (In the pic, I'm the dork with the colar and long pant on the beach. This was only 6 of the 16 fifteen year olds that I supervised that summer.)

    Attached Files:

  6. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    'Adventures in Paradise', Mitchener and, 'Wanderer', Sterling Hayden

    ...an excerpt from another thread subject I posted some time ago


    Just recently I was given some old issues of RUDDER magazine from the 1959-‘63 era. As I paged thru these issues I couldn’t help but notice the numerous times the term motor sailer came up. No wonder this term stuck in my head

    In this same era, 59-61, there appeared on TV a wonderful new series called “Adventures in Paradise” written by noted author James Mitchener and starring Garner McKay as the ex-Koran vet Adam Troy who bought an old sailing schooner Tiki and set up a trading business among the South Sea Islands.
    http://capitainetroy.free.fr/eng/home.html
    http://www.fiftiesweb.com/tv/adventures-in-paradise.htm

    This was truly adventure inspiration, and certainly a big spark to my interest in cruising the world upon the sea.

    As if that wasn’t enough, in 1963 the actor Sterling Hayden published his book Wanderer;
    “They never taught wandering in any school I attended. They never taught the art of sailing a vessel, either. Or that of writing a book. It's all so mysterious and – yes – enchanting. And that is what I suppose this book is all about.”

    Since its first publication in 1963, controversy has surrounded Wanderer, the autobiography of Sterling Hayden. Just as he approached the peak of his career as a movie star, Hayden suddenly abandoned Hollywood, walked out on a shattered marriage, defied the courts, and set sail with his four children aboard the schooner WANDERER. A broke outlaw, he escaped to the South Seas.

    Wanderer is the inspirational story of a complex and contradictory man; a rebel and a seeker, undefeated by failure to find himself in love, adventure, drink, or escape."
    http://www.sheridanhouse.com/catalog.../wanderer.html

    So this was the era I began to get interested in boats. You can see the influences I was under; get on a sailing vessel and take off somewhere. Motor Sailers seemed to offer the best of all worlds for this adventure
  7. brian eiland

    brian eiland Senior Member

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    And thanks for sharing your story Steven