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Anodes

Discussion in 'Carver Yacht' started by Uk4life, Feb 20, 2014.

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  1. Uk4life

    Uk4life Member

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    I plan to change the anodes on my boat, 1987 3297 mariner with inboard 350 Mercruisers, when pulled this spring. I've been doing some research and trying to figure out how many and where will they all be located.....shafts, rudders, hull????

    I appreciate any help!
  2. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    Hi there,

    First of all, once you have your boat out, check and replace present anodes. Then check if all parts and/or equipment that run electricity and touch water inside the boat (bilge water) or outside have sacrificial anodes.

    If your rudders are metal, they will need anode buttons, your prop shaft will need an anode collar, engines will need anode pencils, etc. If you have a boat plan or user manual, that might guide you through what was there on the boat when it came out of the factory, any later additions of equipment such as trim tabs, powered platforms, thrusters, etc. will require you to add anodes to those and list them in your manual and on your plans as needed for future reference.

    These anodes will save your parts from stray current originating from within your boat and systems, galvanic isolators or isolating transformers will save your metal parts from stray current originating from other vessels, docks, etc. surrounding your boat.

    If you search the forums you will find more information about anodes and isolators, and you will sure get more information from other Carver owners and many other professionals around here.

    Keep the thread alive by sharing your findings and actions when you go through the process in Spring time. Enjoy boating!

    Cheers,
  3. Uk4life

    Uk4life Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for the responses. I had not found anything that mentioned trim tabs, so that info is greatly appreciated. I have started writing down anything and everything I do including part numbers, locations, etc. Hopefully that will be a big help in the long run.

    Unfortunately, my owners manual was on the receiving end of a torrential rain from a window left open in the salon......

    Again, I appreciate the help!
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Just a note that you're probably aware of, but others may not. You're talking Magnesium not zinc for fresh water? Some may need to be alluminum due to suppy.
  5. Uk4life

    Uk4life Member

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    I did read to use magnesium for fresh water. Aluminum is ok if unable to get magnesium? What is the trade off if you use aluminum?
  6. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Allumium can be used in place of either zinc or magnesium, but is not as good as either. You'll often find them for outdrives and outboards as the manufacturers don't know what kind of water their units will go into.
    If you go to the search feature above and keyword anodes or zincs you come upon a very informative discussion on them.
  7. AlfredZ

    AlfredZ Senior Member

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    Hi,

    It is common for people to call them "Zincs", thus using zinc anodes for any water, this will effect wether the anodes will work effectively, or even work at all.

    Anodes are made of either Zinc, Aluminum or Magnesium. Each interacts with salt, fresh and/or brackish water in a different way. Such as zinc in fresh water, it builds an oxide layer around it rendering it useless! So, if a comparative table is made, I think it would look like this:

    ------------Salt------Brackish-----Fresh

    Zinc--------Best------Good--------Bad

    Aluminum---Good------Best--------Bad

    Magnesium--Bad-------Bad---------Best

    So plan your annual boating and see what waters you will be in most of the time and get your nodes accordingly. You want to choose something that will keep your more expensive and important parts from being eaten up before their time so choose the best sacrificial anode for your application.

    Again, anodes are used to ground 'ANY' and 'ALL' metal parts that are connected in any way to an electrical power. So even a pump that has a stainless steel blade, or housing for that matter, would need one. Check your equipment and monitor how rapid the anodes and other metal parts are corroding, this will help you decide what to use and most importantly notice if you have an electrical leak problem.

    Take pictures of your anodes after wash-down and after installing new ones, this will be for your future reference and you can add them to this thread for added educational value to which we are all thankful.

    Cheers,
  8. Uk4life

    Uk4life Member

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    NYCAP and Alfred, thank you both for the excellent advice and information