Click for Northern Lights Click for Abeking Click for Cross Click for Westport Click for YFYS

Amels 67M sea axe ownership?

Discussion in 'Amels Yacht' started by cowpesh, Jun 14, 2010.

You need to be registered and signed in to view this content.
  1. cowpesh

    cowpesh Guest

  2. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    7,368
    Location:
    My Office
    Hi,

    If it is the already delivered one it will be supporting a number of vessels owned by the same guy who has been written about extensively here and elsewhere.
  3. YES!

    YES! Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    Hi K1W1,

    I have been biting my tongue so as not to appear as the typical sour grapes competitor, but I do not understand the concept of the support vessel. Is it for high speed Med support only?

    With the wettest bow configuration possible and no protection for the tenders, aircraft or toys; it seems on marginally suitable to provide adequate services for the very valuable cargo.

    If it is for fast, flat water ops only, then there is some logic; but otherwise, perhaps you could enlighten as you seem to have your finger on the pulse of the project (as you usually do).

    All the best,

    Stan
  4. 84far

    84far Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Messages:
    795
    Location:
    Brisbane, AUS
    YES!, the Sea Axe is designed to run into some pretty nasty weather... and at a pretty fast pase to. I think the only 'con' is the customer's toy will get wet.

    But wouldn't mind hearing K1W1's comments as well. Cheers

    Far
  5. Blair

    Blair New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    Kaipara Harbour

    Sorry to butt in, but your point about wetness may not always the case as I have been told by much wiser heads than mine. Such heresay is my limited experience apart from a bit of amateur observation. Seemingly, long gentle shaped forward sections with a deep forefoot and knife bow in a displacement hull form can progressively displace the 'cut water' over a greater hull length and also, the more vertical hull sections above do not accelerate the displaced water as much as it rises up the topsides. With these axe bow shapes the forward wave is lessened both in apparent volume and velocity at that point so it does not 'throw' the water and spray to the same extent as its relatively blunt-bowed cousins do. The downside is less forward buoyancy with the wave piercer effect you achieve but the pitch acceleration is typically less anyway - softer lifts and landings.

    One naval architect chatting with me said that if the owner can afford the construction, berthing and other costs of greater hull length it is significantly more logical to spread the overall volume longitudinally to gain displacement hull efficiency and thereby 'cheap' speed or less power without, apparently, causing it to be extremely wet. He cited "A" and "Silver" as large yachts that perhaps demonstrate that design objective and Steve Dashews passage making series of smaller motor vessels too, as other examples.

    He made the point, with a touch of irony perhaps, that displacement hull bow shapes are looking more like they were designed a century ago, as operating cost efficiency impacts more and the market demands these quite 'slippery' vessels. Basically we are relearning what our forefathers already knew. The last few decades have been about more and more 'real estate' for the length rather than efficiency. He reflected on his view that bulbous extensions had became a neccessity to also help compensate for the less efficient waterline beam to length ratios and bulky shapes that had evolved.
  6. YES!

    YES! Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    All you say and reference is very accurate for a head sea situation. When the seas are angles off the bow, the waves slap the hull sides and the spray goes straight into the air and aft on an axe bow whereas it is thrown more to the side (not all to the side) with a flared bow.

    The wave piercing effect is, as you clearly state, very efficient and the narrow beam entry adds to improved speed with less power. The downside is the sacrifice of beam for the support vessel application. For instance, we need a 40 foot beam to provide a hangar large enough to accommodate the embarked seaplane and helicopter, inside and protected from the weather.

    My question is that they did not even seem to consider the necessity for an enclosure for their aircraft, or perhaps they have none. Boats and subs are fine on a wet aft deck, but cars, motorcycles and aircraft - not so much.

    I know as well as anyone that every ship is a compromise that requires favoring the operational mission statement over the maximum efficiency of the vessel.

    Thank you for the comments and insights.
  7. Blair

    Blair New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    Kaipara Harbour

    You are right Stan - thinking of it further even on a smaller scale, other than downwind blasts, had plenty of wet days sitting on the rail of modern slab-sided sailing yachts going to windward therefore punching into forequarter seas. I guess the price of efficiency would have to be more shelter specified on deck for the toys.
  8. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,313
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Call me skeptical but the new Amels yacht support vessel looks like a blend of DNA from early 1940s destroyer escorts, 1970s supply vessels and the bow off a 1900s light cruiser. Assigning it the features or benefits of a modern axe bow seems like a bit of a marketing stretch to this observer.

    It might look like an axe bow in the right light from the right angle but to me the picture looks like a 19th century warship with a sheet metal facade extending upward from the bulwarks to disguise it as an axe bow.

    The wheelhouse is way back and low, there is nothing much to prevent solid water roaring aft from the submarining bow from removing the bridge and all who stand there in shock when the thing doesn't work like all the neat videos of real axe bow ships in similar conditions.

    Compare this thing with a real axe bow and the differences are readily apparent.
  9. bigboatbill

    bigboatbill Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
    Messages:
    201
    Location:
    Decatur Alabama
    Amels has a pretty interesting video of the Sea Axe in action on their website. Click the video link at the bottom of the home page and then select Sea Axe.
    http://*********************/
  10. Marmot

    Marmot Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Messages:
    3,313
    Location:
    9114 S. Central Ave
    Looks like a fast boat in smooth water with a very low swell. :confused:
  11. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    22,863
    Location:
    Caribbean
    The big Sea Axe 67/9-meter seems to have a name now? "Garcon"?
  12. PatrickvH

    PatrickvH New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Volendam
    Hi everyone,

    I just noticed the conversation about the sea axe. I saw the ship a few weeks ago near to Rotterdam.

    After google the sea axe I discovered that the sea axe was developed by Damen shipyards.

    As far as I know the ship was specially designed for the offshore industry for operations in very hard seas. Sounds to me that the ship is capable for the kind of journeys the fast yacht supplier is intended to.

    Also interesting is the following: http://*********************/editor/assets/artikelen/TYR112_Sea_Axe_Amels_the_yacht_report.pdf

    Stan, isn’t it possible that the water spray is caused by the fenders around the ship, what do you think?


  13. Old Phart

    Old Phart Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    1,336
    Location:
    I dunno
    Too funny!

    P.S.- Seas in pdf pic would be great for a bassmaster tournament.

    RIver Run Bassboat Classic and GrandBass - YouTube
  14. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    22,863
    Location:
    Caribbean
    So the 67/9-meter is completed then you are saying?

    BTW, welcome to YF.com PatrickvH!!! :)