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2001 Grand Alaskan sea trial vibration issue..thoughts?

Discussion in 'Alaskan Yacht' started by Adopo, Jan 29, 2022.

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  1. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    They re beautiful and well built... in Turkey
    gr8trn likes this.
  2. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Never been on one.
    Yes pretty.
    All over different than that GB or anything else above.
    If your looking at these, I fear you really have not determined your type of boating and cruising you are to be doing.

    If your are going to travel slow and sip fuel, shop for a fuel sipping slow trawler.

    If your going to want any speed, then a simi D or planing hull that can deliver some speed.

    Fast designed boats can go slow. But he range, comfort and maintenance are not the same as a boat designed to go slow.

    Overpowering a slow boat to make it faster is not to economical either.

    Find a big ole Hatt LRC.
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2022
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Hunt in the fast trawler line. Grand Banks........
  4. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Turkey
  5. Adopo

    Adopo Member

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    Funny you should mention Vicem, they are beautiful boats, especially the joiner work. Most seem to be a gorgeous mahogany or some variant. We have a house that is made of all exotic woods, an Alfred Browning Parker masterwork built for a textile magnate in 1964, so you know it has all the real mahogany you can no longer get, or is hard to get. So these boats remind me of that. I think many of their larger boats are cold molded, but they are also building in fiberglass now. We looked at a 67 motor yacht in 2020 during the beginning of the CV at the Palm Beach show, and we almost purchased that new boat, but held back, like we have on a number of boats. I just could not imagine things continuing to go the way they have. It feels now to me like we are sitting on the top of a bubble, but who knows.

    We have a condo in Downton St Pete over looking the marina and airport, and I saw this Vicem listed with the picture taken by the fuel dock, and we called about it. What was interesting about this boat is it is almost new, was built around a king size bed, is easy to handle for two, and is beautiful. We saw it two days ago and the owner said Vicem was great to work with, so much so he is selling this one and building another. In the end it is too small, and I don't really want to deal with that much varnish work, although it is gorgeous. But for a short range cruising boat going from marina to marina, and an occasional nigh on the hook, it was gorgeous. Different boat all together.

    https://www.**************/yacht/2020-vicem-50-classic-7940704/
    Kafue likes this.
  6. Adopo

    Adopo Member

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    Regarding the vibration, I spoke to a broker yesterday who recommended this service. He said he has used them with good results, and for around $1,800 or so they can find the issue. It was explained to me that they will put sensors throughout the boat and on all of the equipment that could be the course to locate the exact frequency and location of the vibration. In other words they can pinpoint the cause rather than just replacing things and guessing.

    https://www.datumrms.com
  7. Adopo

    Adopo Member

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    Today is decision day, and although I like this boat's appearance, the hull, stainless, outside, interior, I am passing on it. I just like this style boat. I think it has a lower center of gravity and should cruise better, but with that you give way to a small cramped to me engine room. If the engine room was as good as the appearance and there was no vibration it would be a purchase. And it's not just the money it would take to bring it up to what I would like, it is the time and aggravation. It has two things that are more difficult to find and that is the Great Lakes fresh water history of being shed kept for much of its life. I have located an OA in Ft Myers that has had a similar life, and even more interesting is that it has been shed kept during the summer in Fl while the owner goes back to Michigan. It just doesn't have that old man in the sea look to it. I'm just not really a fan of the raked back pilot houses. And the new boats have lots of room but look like they came out of the back of the Starship Enterprise and landed on the water. Some are kind of cool, and guess I would get use to them. I ramble on....

    I like this boat, but I think it will not fit in our Harbour Town slip and I don't want a boat with over 3000 hours.

    chttps://www.**************/yacht/2005-grand-banks-72-aleutian-rp-8201924/

    Here's that OA-but for some reason is not showing up on YW today. It was there yesterday when it was listed. It may be under contract already. Original owner, Great Lakes then here and shed kept in summers. I guess the market is still stupid strong for boats in this size and condition. Broker said there just is not a lot available in the 60 to 70 range owner operator.

    https://www.galatiyachts.com/yachts/details/8200710/2008/ocean-alexander/64-pilothouse/
    gr8trn likes this.
  8. Hatterized

    Hatterized Member

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    i am standing and applauding your decision

    the older we get the less headaches we need, sadly in my eyes the pleasure of yachting would have been overtaken by the ongoing projects you may have been faced with, some of which could have been major safety issues while asea.

    Cheers to finding your dream boat......

    Scott

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  9. Adopo

    Adopo Member

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    Thank you Scott, everyone on here has been very helpful. I really appreciate the advice and wisdom folks on here offer. I think I will take a breath and try to stop feeling like I am running out of life/time.

    What I learned is this:

    1-Do a sea Trail first, then the survey. See if the owners and broker will allow you to do this prior to the major survey. That of course might mean two sea trials as the surveyor needs to run the boat as well. I know this is an inconvenience for the owner/broker but it will be on my list. If we had done this we would have stopped at the vibration.

    2-Don't compromise on the things you really want unless you are willing to add them.

    3-I will say being patient has not worked for me on prices or boats we should have made offers on.

    In any event, as far as cost is concerned I know the purchase is just the first step. So our journey continues. Thanks guys.
    Hatterized likes this.
  10. Riknpat

    Riknpat Senior Member

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    Given your taste in boats I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the Outer Reef 650 or a Hampton Endurance 658. I've never been on either of them but think they are very handsome boats in the old style.
  11. motoryachtlover

    motoryachtlover Senior Member

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    I did not realize you and/or the boat are in Hilton Head. You have a great resource there in Kevin Jackson of Carolina Marine Diesel. He is hard to get to know but he is very knowledgeable and honest. He is a Man dealer and I think Cummins and Volvo. Very smart and thorough. If you find another boat in and around Hilton Head look him up. If you can’t find his number PM me. When you mentioned the aggravation of troubleshooting the boat that resonated with me. The older we get we are more willing to trade our money for our time. I get it. You made the right decision for you. You will find your boat. This market is a challenge but try to enjoy the hunt.
  12. ranger58sb

    ranger58sb Senior member

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    I wouldn't hesitate over the 3000 hours, or probably even the 4550 on that listing. Much more depends on how it was run and how it was serviced... than the actual hours themselves.

    You could inquire.

    -Chris
  13. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I would not eliminate a boat because of engine hours alone, it really depends on how it was run. The number of gallons burned is more important and that can be checked in the cat displays and during survey in the ECMs

    the last two boats I ran were sold with fairly high hours, 5500 on 3412Es and 3700 hours on C32s. In both case 60 to 65% of these hours where at hull speed. On the C32 powered 84, I almost never ran them over 55% load - 22kts. The surveys and oil samples were clean.

    in this case considering the size of the engines I doubt the boat was routinely pushed hard. It s the nice thing about bigger engines, they have an easy life unless ran by some hot shot sportfish jock

    that said, while I m not familiar with the GB market, the price seems a bit high for 72 footer of that vintage, doesn’t it ?
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2022
  14. bayoubud

    bayoubud Senior Member

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    Good point to run the boat first to check operation and if any vibration, basic stuff. Still need the hull and engine surveyors onboard at same time. Might offer some fuel money to entice a ride before surveys and sea trial.
  15. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    When someone is selling a boat and have a buyer willing to sign a contract with 10% deposit asking for a brief sea trial, I can’t imagine the seller refusing unless he knows the boat will fail. Typically whatever fuel is in the tank is going to go to the buyer anyway.

    a few years ago, the boat i used to run was for sale and I showed it to a couple from California. They were flying home the next day, a Sunday, so there was no time to get the brokers to get the contact and wire a deposit. Etc. They were very interested in the boat (a 70 footer) so the next morning before their flight I took them out... we used 60 gallons of fuel and the next day we had a signed contact and deposit. 60 gallons of fuel is nothing. It comes down to judging how serious the buyer is.

    obviously I knew the boat was going to perform well...
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  16. rtrafford

    rtrafford Senior Member

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    Keep in mind that you don't need to do the sea trial and haul at the same time with the surveyor. You can do both, with a sea trial early under contract and the haul later after the in-water review has taken place. Have the surveyor on board for the full trip to the yard as well. Yes, it costs a few dollars more, but given the investment, it's pennies.
    bayoubud likes this.