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Overnight Anchoring.... Bridle vs Mooring Bit

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by PSW, Feb 27, 2017.

  1. PSW

    PSW Member

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    As I go through the 40 Cabo I recently purchased I am upgrading a number of systems including the ground tackle set up. I recently purchased a 35lb Delta Anchor along with 64ft of 3/8 chain and 300 ft of 8 plait rode. On my last boat I added a Buck Algonquin cleat forward of the windlass that I would tie off to when anchoring. On the Cabo I am staying with the existing Lewmar V2 windlass and I am trying to determine if I could add a Buck Algonquin cleat in front of windlass just off center line or if I should make a "Bridle" and use that going off current bow cleats. Obviously adding a cleat in front of windlass would make securing the anchor a quicker process but not sure if there is any downside of having the load travel through the pulpit vs the current bow cleats on each side?

    Any Thoughts?

    Thanks

    ** Edit: Determined that a cleat would layout better than mooring bit on pulpit. I would mount a little further to the port than blue line I added to photo. I would use stud style cleat to allow for clean install on furthest Port side of rub strip.

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    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
  2. ranger42c

    ranger42c Member

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    I'd plan on both. Cleat to take strain off the windlass. Bridle sometimes (depending on conditions) to reduce bouncing on the rode, even with combo chain/plait.

    I'd also rethink that 35-Delta. Depends on your expected holding ground, typical winds and tide/current, etc... but I've used a Delta... good that it has only one moving part... but I believe there are better options out there now. Anchor choice turns "religious" sometimes so won't belabor the point.

    -Chris
  3. bobhorn

    bobhorn Member

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    35lb anchor seems kind of light for that size boat.
  4. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    I M not familiar with condition in your area but understand you usually anchor in deeper water so chances are you will usually use more than the chain you have

    In that case, I don't see why you d use a bridle. Cleating off the line is the easiest way to secure the line.

    That said, I have to admit i rarely use a bridle at least not to relieve pressure off the windlass. These things are designed to handle big loads. Never had a problem with one in 30+ years...

    The main reason I use a bridle is to stop the noise of the chain slamming on the pulpit windy conditions as the boat swings. These days, I don't even use a twin bridle with a chain hook but a single line with a heavy duty carabiner on one end and a large bowlin on the other which I put over the windlass. Much easier to rig and so far the carabiner has held up 25+ kts.
  5. PSW

    PSW Member

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    Typically anchor in 30 to 40ft of water. The boat had 40ft of 3/8 chain. I only went up to 64ft with the new set up as I want to be aware of weight forward and how the boat will sit at rest.
  6. DOCKMASTER

    DOCKMASTER Member

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    I agree with Pascal and don't see the need for a bridle. I anchor in much deeper water regularly and I just make the 8 plait line off to my C/L cleat that is behind the windlass. To each his own but a bridle just seems more work than necessary. As long as you are made off to a good strong cleat I don't see the need for more.
  7. PSW

    PSW Member

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    That is what I was hoping to hear. Just wanted to make sure there wasn't a reason I have never seen a Cabo with a CL cleat to tie off rode when anchoring.
  8. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I wouldn't put Buck Algoquin parts on my boat period. That being said just use one line to the anchor and tie it off on one of the bow cleats......I've found that tieing it off a little off center keeps the boat a little off center to the current and helps with swing a bit.
  9. PSW

    PSW Member

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    I always had a good experience with the Buck on my Ocean Yacht. The Cabo foundry for cleats is no longer in business so I looked at pretty much everything and felt the Buck was style that would look nice and had good specs to handle the load with nice finish. I would be interested in hearing more though about your experiences with that foundry. I actually ordered the cleat this morning from Deep Blue Yacht Supply. Having a center cleat just makes anchoring so much easier IMO. I looked at a number of brands and felt a round tapped cleat would look and function the best on the existing rub strip.

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  10. 30West

    30West Member

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    I'm curious, as a small-boat guy, how you would set up and use a bridle on that bow? The line is going through the bow pulpit, so you would need to fetch it from under the pulpit, then tie a knot of some sort to your bridle, before it tightens up. There are some hardware bits to use instead of a knot, is that common? My boat has a cleat next to the windlass, with deck switches for the power windlass right there, so it is just too easy to cleat the line off. If I didn't have the cleat, I'd be tempted to let the windlass hold the line more often, which would worry me for the windlass.
  11. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    This is why you normally don't use a bridle with line, only with chain. With chain you reach under the pulpit and attach a chain hook to the chain, run lines to each side cleats and pay out chain so the line takes the tension and the extra chain weight adds to the catenary effect.

    The trick is to keep tension on the hook so it doesn't drop.

    But it all depends on the boat setup. For instance on the 84 Lazzara I m running, reaching over beyond the nchor roller is difficult so i use a single line which runs down the chute alongside the chain but it eliminates the chain slamming as the boat swings.

    With a line rode, you don't have the chain noise so you don't need a bridle or anything IMG_7355.JPG
  12. 30West

    30West Member

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    Hanging a loop on the windlass seems like a good solution: takes the load off the windlass motor and brake. The windlass bearings are as robust as the ones holding the wheels on your car, should easily hold the shock and load of an anchor line. I can't see from the picture if PSW has that option, looks like his windlass drum is, like mine, inside a housing.
  13. Trinimax

    Trinimax Member

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    Since you have rope rode the cleat should be adequate. my only concern is the size of the anchor. 35 pounds is a bit on the low side in my opinion. on my old 38 ocean we used a 44 lb delta claw, which gave us no issues. Now I use the same size claw on my 43 ocean and I am happy with how she holds
  14. Prospective

    Prospective Member

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    I'm no expert but agree with Trinimax. I put a 55lb (25kg) Rocna on my 43' Ocean. That was mid/heavy for a powerboat of my displacement based on their table.
  15. PSW

    PSW Member

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    I had a 35lb Delta on the 40 Ocean with no issues. I have no issue with moving up if necessary. Primarily anchor in mud or gravel bottom. Based on Lewmar Delta chart a 35 is recommended but maybe consideration to a 44lb should be given.
  16. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    It also depends A LOT on what you have behind the anchor. A lot of SF have like 6' of chain and the rest is rope. If you have all chain it adds a considerable amount of holding power.
  17. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    The SF guys who anchor a lot in SoCal tend to use all chain, no rope, carry about about 240' - 300'. We have done that since 1972 with Danforth anchors only in our CA and Mexican waters on a number of SF. Never had an issue, up to 55 knots of wind. These anchorages are normally deeper than you see out East, starting at 40' plus. Chain allows you to reduce the typical advertised scope as well. We upsized one level off of the Danforth sizing charts. Never used a bridle rig/tensioner/tie-off cleat, etc. Straight off the Windlass' gypsy, vertical and horizontal models. Would typically upsize the Windlass one step on their sizing charts as well.
  18. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I like a lot of chain like that but also like 100 yards of rope behind it. If it gets really windy you can let out more and stay on the rope without a bridle, the rope isn't as heavy but extends your depth of anchoring, and the rope cushions the chain sitting on top of it......PLUS, easy to cut the heck off in any wind if you need to dump it.
  19. PSW

    PSW Member

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    Standing at Fisheries Supply now exhanging the 35lb Delta for the 44lb. I tried all chain on last boat and it moved too much weight forward and static trim of boat was affected. I have found that 50 to 75 ft of chain with 300 ft of rode gives you best combination. I will use 64ft of 3/8 chain with 300ft of rode. To get same capacity for depth would be a lot of weight forward over bow with little buoyancy.
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
  20. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    With an all chain set-up, you typically go to a high strength chain link or something like a triple b link so you can downsize the link and save weight. This also requires a change in the gypsy to match the link. This can typically let you go down to 1/4" . Would not go all chain with standard galvanized chain link.

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