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How big a boat is needed to safely cross the ocean?

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by Zewu, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Zewu

    Zewu New Member

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    Hey there!

    I am planning a trip to French Polynesia and so I am working out the possible itineraries. Unfortunately I don't own a yacht which would solve all such problems. I would like to go between the islands of Mangareva and Rapa, a connection which isn't served by air nor by cargo boat. So now I have this idea about asking any of the local fishermen on Mangareva if we could use their boat to make the trip if I pay them 100,000 CFP (~$1,000). The distance is about 1150km (715 miles) of open ocean. Now my question is: would it be possible to travel such a distance by a relatively small motorboat, or what would be the smallest kind of vessel required to do it safely? This would be when it's not cyclone season. (This is unless I find a yacht going the right way which I am afraid will be likely.)

    Thanks a lot for your answers! :cool:
  2. Yachtguymke

    Yachtguymke Senior Member

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    Buy a Sailboat

    You could buy a sailboat to make the trip. You dont have much fuel cost, there is lots of storage room, you could probably find one cheap. That is my suggestion. I did a trans-atlantic in feb of 1998 on a 33' Comet 1000 that a Canadian Owner bought in Plymouth England and sailed it to St. Johns, Newfoundland. It was very comfortable.
  3. Zewu

    Zewu New Member

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    Buying a sailboat, I never thought about that! Thanks a lot for your answer Yachtguymke, I will definitely look into it :)
  4. sailronin

    sailronin Senior Member

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    How large a boat to cross an ocean?
    John Guzzwell sailed around the world in "Trekka" which was 20 feet 6 inches long. Robert Manery sailed across the Atlantic in "Tinkerbell", a 13 foot sailboat.
    Nordhaven 46 foot motor trawlers cross the Atlantic, Bruce Kessler circumnavigated in a Delta 70 foot trawler.
    Yet it is routine for 150 foot motoryachts to be carried across the Atlantic on "Dockexpress" type ships.

    It all depends on how comfortable you want to be and how seaworthy the boat.

    Dave
  5. barsam

    barsam New Member

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    Budget is just the right size

    My budget dictates to me that I will be looking at the 28ft mark and my heart tells me that's big enough. I know that it is done by numerous sailors, however I bet they know they have paid their dues and have a heart for advanture as well. Overwise, it looks like tempting fate to me; I would need to feel very comfortable about what my boat could do and couldn't do. Myself also.
  6. GeminiRat

    GeminiRat New Member

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    How big, How safe?

    If you're talking about a power boat instead of a sailing vessel then your fuel range has to be a major consideration. Our last yacht had a range of 7500 miles which was more than sufficient for a Trans-Atlantic crossing, however trusting in your abilities to make the journey is a different story. We chose to transport our yacht and meet it on the other side. The ocean is a huge place and can be unpredictable; our boat was about relaxation and having fun. I never have found fighting for survival very relaxing, thrilling to be sure; but not what I wanted to do in my time away from work. The size of your vessel is more of a comfort measure than a criterion, people have made it across the Atlantic on some pretty small vessels and least you think size is any assurance I have but one word for you, Titanic.
  7. MYCaptainChris

    MYCaptainChris Senior Member

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    the keys

    How long is a piece of string?

    Down in the keys there is a small yacht that made it safely across the atlantic....... when I say small I mean small........ I think it was about 6 foot long.
  8. Kevin

    Kevin YF Moderator

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    I remember reading, perhaps a year or two ago, about a couple that crossed the Pacific in a home-built 19' sailboat. So I guess if you're got the desire to do it, any yacht can be considered "enough" to cross an ocean.
  9. MedRascal

    MedRascal Senior Member

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    Well, if you wann ago small, some people did it on a windsurf some years ago! :eek:

    It all depends on how many people would be onboard living and how much time you plan on staying onboard/use her once you crossed the Atlantic.

    I wouldn't go too small, as probably the boat would be your home for some long long time! :)

    Anyway, its a dream of many to sail across the globe...mine too one day!
  10. Manu

    Manu New Member

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    Zewu,
    Buying a boat in french polynesia is very tricky, especially if the vessel is register in French Polynesia itself. Taxes are huge and you will pay a fortune for any vessel with a French polynesian flag. Asking local fishermen is a smart idea.Besides Tahiti and Bora Bora, you will find extremely kind people to help you on other islands. But you may want to buy a vessel in Tonga or Fiji. They are very cheap there. And sailing the Pacific is by far the best in the world. You may end up satying there for years which i will do when i ll have the money for a nice 36 footer :D
    Regards.
  11. Kevin

    Kevin YF Moderator

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    Who among us here doesn't have that dream in some form or another? ;)
  12. Matt V. Aardt

    Matt V. Aardt New Member

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    Hi folks. I am retiring now and need some advise regarding what yacht is best for transatlantic exploring. A motor yacht like a Bering 30 to 40 mt or a catamaran? I need 4 cabins including my owners cabin, plus be able to to carry a tender plus jet ski, diving equipment etc. Any advice would help please
  13. Matt V. Aardt

    Matt V. Aardt New Member

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    Exactly what my dream is but what yacht is the best to buy?
  14. RT46

    RT46 Senior Member

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    Al Grover did it in this boat:

    lots of stuff online about the boat and the crossing.

    The boat is on display in Freeport NY

    grover 1.jpg
    grover 2.jpg
  15. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    Do you mean with Bering 30 to 40 mt a motor yacht with a length of 30 to 40 Meter?

    Catamaran sailing yachts in that size are a pretty rare species. They require some crew to handle and are quite expensive to build. And most of the (french) production catamaran yachts with the internal volume you want, like the Lagoon 560 or 620, the Fountain Pajot range or Catana catamarans are boats for warm climates and nice weather. And their build quality and usefull lifespan cannot be compared with anything like a Bering yacht or other long range trawler (steel or GRP). For exploring the harsh enviroment of the (northern) Atlantic, you need something more beefy and with more protection for person on the wheel and especially when used as a live aboard. And any harbour master and lock operator around the atlantic will hate you because of their beam :).

    With the budget for a 30 to 40 meter steel or GRP trawler or long range explorer (preowned or new) you have a whole world to choose from. If your name tells me, you are living in the BENELUX area, you live in the middle of that yachting industry. Names like Moonen come into my mind. Or just contact Vripack Naval Architects in Sneek (NL). They have tons of ready to build plans for long range trawlers and yachts, which have been built before or they have the local yards on hand to start a project. Have a look at their portfolio, they show all plans.

    If you are located on the other side of the pond, Bering or IMHO Nordhavn are good names to talk to. Both companies build in China anyhow. And if you are looking for a preowned, most of the above mentioned boats are available on the second hand market.

    If you could specify your ideas a bit more, this forum will fill you up with ample of great advice and info.

    But if I misunderstood your question and you mean a 30 to 40 ft boat, there is a very beefy 48/50 ft catamaran available on the market. The South African build St. Francis 48 or in its newest version, the St. Francis 50. This is in my opinion the most seaworthy, highest quality, all weather catamaran with the volume an loading capacity you want, available on the market. It can be safely handled by a crew couple and is by far cheeper to operate for a normal mortal boater.

    1.JPG

    2.JPG

    GAP.jpg
  16. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Having been to these places myself I would say the likelihood of finding a fisherman of which there appeared to be very few in Mangareva who would take you 1430 nm ( they need to come back) for $1000 very slim indeed.
  17. Matt V. Aardt

    Matt V. Aardt New Member

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    Thanks much for your reply and advice.
    One of the issues I am faced with when looking at the sailing yacht and catamaran as apposed to the Nordhavn/ Bering Motor yacht is the carrying capacity. I want to explore the diving spots of the world and the islands in more remote areas and off the usual tourist routes. Due to old military injuries with land mines etc my ears are not to good so I have issues doing normal scuba diving (I lose my balance when under pressure) so am going to purchase the Dragon Deepflight (http://www.deepflight.com/dragon/) 2 man submarine. The problem is that it is quite heavy (1800kg) and long (5m) so difficult to find a yacht (Which is more fun and can be faster than most Explorer yachts on the market) that will carry this. I have thought of designing an inflatable 'dock' onto which I could drive the Dragon in a semi inflated position then inflate to create a cocoon with a semi rigid hull which could then be towed behind a catamaran.
    I specifically looked at the the 30 to 40m motor yacht range as looking at berths around the world anything over that is either ridiculously expensive (Paying $3m USD for a birth I would only use occasional for refits seems a waste) or rare. Denia Yacht port is far more reasonable, has excellent facilities, an apartment next to the port for crew or friends visiting and is close to my home in Ibiza so ideal.
    I have been advised on and offered the Balance 601 (Nexus 601) (http://balancecatamarans.com/series/specifications/specifications-2/) (https://www.facebook.com/nexuscatam...270/?video_source=pages_finch_thumbnail_video) which is in my limited knowledge a beautiful boat that could well do what I need and is spacious and well fitted, plus is immediately available. I have never sailed a catamaran so do not have a clue if this is the right way to go or if it can in fact do the sort of sailing I intend doing. My budget for the running and maintenance of the yacht is around $1m a year if that helps in terms of choices?
  18. HTMO9

    HTMO9 Senior Member

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    With the type, size and weight of your planned tenders, a catamaran must be quite big in order to safely accommodate and handle safely such "toys". We operate research, offshore and support vessels with ROVs and subs. This is business for professionals. To safely hoist (deploying and getting back on deck) a sub or a larger tender, you need a stable platform and beefy lifting gear plus professional crew. A 40 meter one off catamaran is a giant and may require a crew of 8 to 10 and may easily break the 500 GT border. Beyond that gross tonnage, we are talking about very expensive regulations and operating costs. I would rather forget about a catamaran for your planned use. An existing large monohull sailboat (40 to 45 Meters) could be converted to carry such toys. Several larger sailboats usable for that purpose are available on the second hand market.

    The minimum boat for your needs is something like this:

    Moonen superyacht Sofia featuring a three-man submarine.jpg

    GA-137.jpg
    The Moonen yacht Sofia. A similar existing yacht of this size could be converted for your needs. Converting a preowned commercial trawler could also be a possible approach. 1.000.000,-$ is a pretty good anual budget for a good sized yacht.

    I have personally seatrailed the Deepflight Falcon and 2 different Uboat Worx type subs. We have decided for the UboatWorx sub as the separate cockpits of the deepflight falcon and its sister, the dragon have and will again, cause claustrophobia with unprepared passengers. A passenger will feel much more comfortable, sharing the compartement with the operator and / or other passengers. And the UboatWorx type can be equipped with remote controlled manipulator arms and other options. Do yourself a favor and personally seatrail both types. A lot of money can be spent on the wrong sub.

    C-Quester 3 Submersible Highres_1.JPG

    1811_1350371660_4106981466.jpg

    My personal advice would be: Go for a powered exploreryacht with a larger tender deck and appropiate lifting gear and seatrail the Sub prior purchase.
    Feel free to ask more specific questions.
  19. Rodger

    Rodger Senior Member

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  20. RER

    RER Senior Member

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