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Best yacht for a beginner with my needs?.

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by xryanx, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. xryanx

    xryanx New Member

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    Ok, so, im looking at purchasing a yacht. (ive looked into Searay mainly, but im open to other companies).

    I would need something that could fit two people semi comfortably (room wise), a decent galley, and something for overnight fishing trips (which is what the vessel would be used for--mainly along the coast/offshore). Being that Im going to be living in South Florida soon, I also plan to make day trips to the Bahamas and back again with a friend. Speed is not a top priority for me, though, I would like something that could move a tiny bit fast incase a storm rolled in or something.

    Also, just throwing this out here too, but, would a 50 footer be too much for a beginner like myself, or should I look for something in the 45 foot range to suit my needs?.

    Thanks!
  2. ranger42c

    ranger42c Member

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    Since fishing is your primary objective, you'd probably find many more brands suitable to that. Things like built-in rod-holders, live wells, fish boxes, etc. that usually aren't included in Sea Ray designs (and often, not so easily added after the fact). That's probably not universal, in that I'd guess Sea Ray made SOME fishboats sometime in their history.... but in general, brands who have routinely built fishboats might serve you better.

    Perhaps Hatteras, Viking, Bertram, Wellcraft... and then more ideas might depend on whether you mean a flying bridge boat, or an express/open, or even a cuddy cabin or center console.

    Depending on what "beginner" means, a 45 might be about the same as a 50. And that can go either way.

    -Chris
  3. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    Since you are beginning, you may want to consider a few charter experiences first to get a feel for what you like. Then get to know the area boat dealers who have great customer service reputations.

    My recommendation would be a Cabo 40, great sea boat, more than enough room for two. I prefer a Flybridge because the view at the helm is better without the need of a tuna tower and having a comfortable salon is much nicer than having to climb down steps to live in a space with poor natural light. This can easily be handled by two, and resale should be decent, since this is your first and you will most likely begin taking notes on what you would like on your next!
  4. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Depending on what exactly you mean by "beginner", I'd say you'll be required (by your insurance company) to use a captain for at least the first season , if not the first year, with a 50, and quite possibly 45' or more.

    A lot of questions need to be asked, starting with what kind of experience you do have.

    Some things to consider:
    1) as far as the galley is concerned, remember that the best thing to make for dinner on a boat are reservations, and smell on a boat get into the fabrics and headliners.
    2) Would you prefer a raised helm, which is better for visibility while cruising, but more uncomfortable when rocking or with quartering seas. Also can you deal with a ladder or would steps to the helm be better.
    or would you prefer a low helm (more of an express style, which gives you a more comfortable ride in heavy seas, generally better visibility when backing into a slip, and is easier to move from helm to line handling.
    3) Covered or open. Up on the Chesapeake having a more enclosed helm will extend you season, but in Florida you could roast.
    4) Budget.

    These will lead you to many more questions. As for comfortably fitting two people, that could be as small as 31' for weekend cruising and overnights.
  5. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Then guess you should eliminate kitchens at home too? Sorry, that surprised me. We cook all the time on the boat, both in the galley and on deck by grilling. We don't have an issue such as you describe. We do have a hood and exhaust and keep the filter clean. I know people who never cook as you suggest, but I know others who seldom eat off their boat. Most of us are somewhere in between.
  6. ranger42c

    ranger42c Member

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    Seems an odd comment. We cook onboard lots, as do most of our acquaintances...

    ?

    -Chris
  7. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    What's your price range? For what you'd want to do I think 45' is a nice size. Cabo's and Vikings are what I'd be looking at. Searays are a great do it all boat, but not geared for rough seas and heavy fishing.
  8. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

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    Cooked aboard all the time.
    Can't make no reservations at Hawksbill Cay in the Exumas or the other remote anchorages we use to hang out for weeks at a time.
    Had a 12 volt fridge and freezer run by 150 watts of solar panels and packed full of food. Good life and no marinas, restaurants or big cities around.
    Different boating around New York, but not my cup of tea.
    As for new boat and what to get...?
    A 34' Sea Ray with twin diesels would probably be a good beginner boat, then move up later.
    My first boat was a 44' Bernuda.
    More boat and more expenses than I needed back then, should have gone smaller but didn't know how expensive boats are too run and maintain.
    Been going smaller ever after.
    If money is unlimited, different story.
  9. MYTraveler

    MYTraveler New Member

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    Since you are a self-proclaimed newbie, I will suggest that you avoid using the term "yacht" to describe your boat, or one you want. To many, it will come off as pretentious. Definitions vary, and technically the term may apply to very small vessels, but in general I think you will find the term best applied to 100' + vessels with full-time professional crew. Anything less is a wanna be.
  10. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

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    Aye, that is BS.
    Any pleasure boat over 18' is considered a yacht according to some old definition. (The Dutch guys invented the "Yacht" label, 18' or bigger, Jackt)
    The American Yacht Regisrty listed any pleasure boat over 30'.
    Over 80' is a Mega Yacht, Super Yacht over what, 140'?
    The big guys, with their big Yachts call their vessels "Boats" anyhow.
    What Google says:

  11. Belle

    Belle Member

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    So, would you like it if I called you a wanna be expert? Well, don't need to, Norseman sort of did. But you know what, we have over 100' and full time crew and you'll never ever ever ever hear us refer to our boats as yachts. But if someone thinks of their 18' sailboat as one, then right on, dude, is all I say. There is no final definition of yacht, just usage and usage is all over the flippin way. Now hopefully enough of this and someone will help the OP yachtsman.
  12. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Yes, no. If you're truly a beginner, then a 50' or a 45' is too much for you. However, there are cures for that. Some chartering perhaps with Captains. Some training. Then eventually charter bareboat, then you're ready to think about boats. From a 45' to a 50' of the same design is little difference. From a 45' center console to a 50' flybridge is very different. We had many years of experience with a 30' twin engine on the lake but were in no way prepared for larger and coastal. What we did was classes, hands on training, and gaining of experience. While you do that you'll find out a lot more about the right boat for you, so don't try to jump over steps. Just take your first step toward the goal and the others will fall into place.

    Now, if I've misinterpreted "beginner" then please correct me to what you mean by the term.
  13. CSkipR

    CSkipR Member

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    As you may or may not know boats are expensive. Most people underestimate their annual costs. A 45-50ft boat will generally cost you 20k + a year in expenses and in most cases that's light and doesn't include fuel. If you're paying for dockage then expect more. Insurance anywhere from 5-12k+ year depending on size & year of boat and then the maintenance. If all this is something you expect then no big deal. You could certainly purchase a 45-50ft vessel and hire a capt to teach you how to operate which would probably be your best option. Lots of captains ready to assist and I second the 40ft Cabo flybridge.
  14. MYTraveler

    MYTraveler New Member

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    Piss-poor analogy, since I don't label myself as an expert, particularly without the requisite credentials. Chill out a little bit -- I was just trying to offer the guy some friendly advice -- and from the sounds of it you follow that same advice yourself, despite owning a 100' boat with full time-crew, which you would "never ever ever ever . . . refer to as a yacht". I guess that would make you a bit of a hypocrite.
  15. Kevin

    Kevin YF Moderator

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    Traveler, Belle, everyone else...

    Please don't start!

    Try to keep the thread on topic.
  16. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Ryan- to get back on topic, what is your annual budget and your budget for the purcahse price? Your wants and needs? And, length of time of your trips?
  17. Norseman

    Norseman Senior Member

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    That would be me.:cool:

    Sorry, I was under the influence, will try not post during Happy Hour:confused:
  18. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    There is a lot more to it than the size of the boat.

    The layout and access to lines from the helm, control locations as well as hull shape and windage all play a much bigger role in how much boat one can handle. Some 60 footers are easier to handle than some 40 footers...

    But as others mentioned insurance underwriters will require more training and time with a captain as size increase.

    Seems to me if fishing and cruising for two are your priority that a 40/45 sportfish woudl be ideal giving you all the confort need (generator, AC, decent galley and head)

    I also totally disagree with the who needs a galley comment... There is nothing like enjoying a nice home made meal in the comfort of your own boat anchored in a remote location.
  19. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I think something along the lines of a 40' Cabo would be an excellent choice.
  20. xryanx

    xryanx New Member

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    Sorry for being MIA!. I will check out the 40 ft Cabo. Trip length wise, I would stay for 1-2 nights then head back to dry land. My budget right now is $300000 but can go up to $350,000 if needed. I was looking at getting my captains license--but--clestial navigation which is required confuses the crap out of me. Chart plotting on a paper map, I could maybe learn even though itd take me a bit, I know almost all maps are now electronic though, which on a chartplotter/GPS is way easier for me. Whatever yacht I purchase, I do plan to do a USCG safety course either way.

    I was looking at a Boston Whaler awhile ago, as well as Everglades. I REALLY liked the Everglades boat.

    Also, I would be going with a fly bridge as it would make it easier for me to see when needed.
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015

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