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32' Permacraft SF, anyone have any info on these?

Discussion in 'Vintage & Classic Yachts' started by Capt J, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    As a kid growing up, my dad had a couple of 32' Permacraft SF's. I was young when he sold the last one. He had a lot of different boats and raved about these. I don't remember the ride or any of that, but do remember him claiming that the factory advertised that the 32' with 440 chryslers was guaranteed to do 50 mph. Does anyone have any experience with these and what speeds they did with various engines, etc etc?
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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  3. DJ Agnello

    DJ Agnello New Member

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    I realize you posted this query 5 long years ago, but just came across it today, while looking for some info on a old boat I once owned. I had a 1971 32' Permacraft from 1988 to 1997, if you're still interested in some info.
  4. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    How was the speed and the ride? What engines did yours have? I remember the one my dad had with 318's only had a 120 gallon fuel tank and the one with 440's had an additional 50 gallon tank. I could've gotten one that's been sitting in Pompano for free that had running (but tired) 350's because I decided I didn't need a project boat I was going to dump $60k into.....LOL
  5. DJ Agnello

    DJ Agnello New Member

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    We had 318 Chryslers. They were great on gas and had more than enough power for our purposes...which were: 1. getting offshore quickly to fish and 2. getting out of trouble when necessary, like out-running a storm or getting through the "washing machine" of an inlet. Speed was dependent on surface conditions but had a comfortable ride on calm seas at 30-35 knots. Trolled at much slower speeds. Yes, the gas tank was small-ish, but those Chryslers were efficient and we could troll for 10-12 hours on half a tank, if the seas weren't too rough. We swapped out the port engine, dockside, halfway through our ownership and it was pretty easy...again, because of those 318s.

    Those early 70s Permacrafts were TANKS. They could get though anything and were surprisingly watertight. They were made back in the day when nobody skimped on the thickness of the fiberglass. We hauled her out to clean the bottom every six months and the folks at The Ways, in Palm Beach Gardens, were always surprised at how heavy she was for her size. The only design flaw with them was the salt water-fed heat exchanger. They had a very short life span. Went through several of them during the time we owned it and never spent the money or time to make the switch to a fresh water cooled system. Anyway, that Permacraft never let us down in any significant way and I miss it. They don't make them like that, anymore.

    I'm curious about this boat you say is sitting in Pompano. Is it still there? What can you tell me about it? When we sold ours, (for 50% more than we paid for it, by the way), I think it went down to that area and wonder if it could be our old B'Wanna III. There aren't many of them around. I'm curious whether someone swapped the 318s for 350s, which would have been easy, and it's still around. Everything in the cabin might disintegrate, but those Permacraft hulls will last forever. Did you know the hull was patterned after the 31' Bertram?
  6. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    I don't think it was the same boat. The name of the one for free was "Free Spool" and had been around here for years and years. Someone took it off of the owners hands about a month ago, maybe 2.

    They really cruised at 30-35 knots with only 318's? Or was that Wide open? Problem is that they have a small following and if you sink the money into one to restore it, you don't get nearly that much back when you go to sell it.

    The one my dad had for many many years.....probably from 1980-1996 was called "Strike 1", he had several others, but that was the one he always kept. I don't know what ever happened to it.
  7. DJ Agnello

    DJ Agnello New Member

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    30-35 flat out, calm seas, carrying not too much water or gas.

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