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1974 Viking 40

Discussion in 'Viking Yacht' started by floatingsquash, Feb 7, 2012.

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  1. floatingsquash

    floatingsquash New Member

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    Howdy

    I'm looking at a 1974 Viking 40 Convertablehttp://www.boattrader.com/listing/1974-Viking-Boats-40-Convertible-(md)-98618335 ...
    I'm looking for some info... It has 500 hours since the last major overhaul, awlgripped (what's that!?) in 2010, and has the original engines.
    my question: for 25 grand, it looks like a steal. with the original motors though, i'd be worried. is it tough enough and still well enough to take a canyon trip, about 90 - 100 miles both ways?
    other than that it looks really nice
    thanks!
  2. Capt. Mike

    Capt. Mike New Member

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    marine survey
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  3. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    The 40 Convertible was a hugely popular model. Viking sold a ton of them and they are considered well built for their era. However most of those that fished offshore were diesel powered. Pushing 30,000 pounds through the water is asking a lot from those gas motors. You are correct to ask if it's practical to run this boat 100 miles out. A trip now and then is one thing - if it's in good mechanical condition. To run out 100 miles regularly? It's probably not the right boat.
  4. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    A friend of mine had a later Viking 41' with 8v92's, he ran to the canyons for decades many times a season. It was a good boat for that, I wouldn't consider doing it with gas as you don't have enough range, and reliability is another factor.
  5. floatingsquash

    floatingsquash New Member

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    What about the older model hatteras and Egg Harbors? They both run diesel, and the egg harbor was completely restored (hand laid teak, new upholstry, etc.). any thoughts on them?
  6. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    ...as far as the Egg Harbor being completely restored? That brings up more questions than answers.

    Based purely on brand most would give a nod to Hatteras. But there's more to consider. If these are in the same price range as the Viking you must consider that an older boat that can be bought on the cheap probably has an expensive re-fit standing in the way of it becoming a dependable canyon runner. That re-fit could easily cost more than what you paid for the boat.

    An older fixer can provide a lot of enjoyment if that project is compatible with your intended use. But if you're looking to fish the canyons you would do better to buy a boat that's at least close to being good-to-go. Boat values are at historical lows. The soft market will help your boat-buying dollar go farther. Unfortunately you will find that your boat-fixing dollar doesn't enjoy the same benefit.
  7. floatingsquash

    floatingsquash New Member

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  8. floatingsquash

    floatingsquash New Member

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    Used 1968 Egg Harbor Sedan Sportfisherman, North Shore MA

    heres the restored egg harbor... but it confuuses me, theres multiple listings for this boat (the same pics at least), in 2 different locations. make you think it's a scam or something?? It says 69000 at the top, but then, for the one listing, in the details, it says price: 225,000... :confused: :confused:
  9. Kafue

    Kafue Senior Member

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    One major issue on this beautifully restored Egg Harbor:
    MAINTENANCE!

    You have gone from a fibreglass hulled boat to a wooden hull and that is a totally different situation. The experts on this forum will be able to fill you in on the many issues regarding this. As for the topsides, I hope you have a covered mooring or you will spend half your boating time with sandpaper and paint brushes keeping all that teak looking so good.
  10. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    The hats have two 214 hp detroits
    The Egg has two 286 hp motors.
    that's not alot of HP for the weight.

    I think either will be a slow boat to the canyons.
    Economical maybe but you better take some coffe with you

    And as Kafue wisely points out, wooden boats are not for people that don't have either some skill in woodworking or the money to pay some one who does.

    I say this as a person who loves wooden boats and has owned a couple.
    My current boat is 'glass.......

    Good luck
  11. dsharp

    dsharp Senior Member

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    You need to find a knowledgable broker for advice. The boats you are looking at have obsolete engines (8-53's) that were not that great when they were new. They are all marginally powered which makes for a loud, slow trip. There are better deals on the market with lighter hulls and more modern powerplants. Don't be lured by a low purchase price. On a 35 year old boat nearly everything is ready to be replaced.
  12. RT46

    RT46 Senior Member

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    My pick would be the 1968 Hatteras Convertible, South Jersey NJ

    also the 41 is a well respected boat that is a classic that can run to the canynos with the big boys, or maybe behind them....

    if you buy one of the above boats;
    you can not get to the canyon in 3 hrs burning 100+ gallons an hour at 30kts while watching sat TV on the air conditioned bridge and eating dove bar ice cream pops from the sub zero......while checking your email

    what you can do:
    is get a decent, older, well cared for, 40-something foot SF that is a well known and respected brand with decent diesel power, and is a safe boat, for around $50K.....
    so it might take you 5-8 hrs at 15-18 kts burning 20-30 GPH (depending on boat) to get to the canyon.

    My vote would be for an older, well cared for Hatt, Viking, Betram, or Post with Detroits....

    Unless you are going to do multiple trips, charter, tournament fish, or use it for high end business clients there is no need to spend big bucks to have a new or late model big dollar SF with the latest and greatest electronics, granite counter tops, and computer driven common rails that you need a PHD to work on and a bank roll to maintain.....

    Depending on what you want and your budget, you may be barking up the right tree...

    good luck
    RT46
  13. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    You're not going 100 miles out and 100 miles back at 15-18 knots in any of those boats.
  14. RT46

    RT46 Senior Member

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    you can see those older 41 Hatts at the Hudson all the time...
  15. RER

    RER Senior Member

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    I didn't say they can't do it at 9 knots. I didn't say they can't do it if they're re-powered.

    I said those boats - with the original DD8V53's can't make that run as you suggested - at a 15-18 knot cruise speed.
  16. RT46

    RT46 Senior Member

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    rER,

    Ok, I understand your point.

    I really thought the vintage 41 Hatt w 8v53s was a 15 to 18 kt boat.
    I did not know it was a 9kt boat.

    I agree, I have seen them repowered w Yanmars and Cummins
  17. Beau

    Beau Senior Member

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    Floatingsquash

    Just causal comments: select a boat that serves your needs. You're going to be traveling 100 miles "out". That's not flounder fishing territory That's 7-8 hours at 15 knots. Make sure you 'll have the 1/3 fuel reserve to get back (16 hours at 35 gph = 560 gals for the run out and back, 250+ for the reserve). Older boats don't necessarily have hugh fuel capacities. Plus make sure the boat is mechanically and structurally sound. Generally the models you're discussing are good boats , but individually they may be a death trap for that distance, and the sea conditions that can change radically. IMMO it would not be imprudent to look at a newer boat a bit smaller if, like for most of us, cash is an issue. You also have to consider the nature of the electronics on an older boat. We all see some nice older boats fishing Hudson, but having been on a few, I can tell you they are up to date! Especially in the engine room. Good luck. The search for the right boat can be a fun experience.
  18. Colbachlaw

    Colbachlaw New Member

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    Floatingsquash,

    Buy the newest, best boat you can afford even if that means going smaller or waiting a few years.

    Maintenance on an older boat will eat you up alive (I have a 79' Bertram and 89' Viking, so I know).

    Buying the boat is the cheap part, maintaining it is the expensive part. I bought my 48' Viking two weeks ago and even though it surveyed very well, I have already dropped $35K getting some engine and cosmetic work done and I am looking at another $25K in electronics.

    All bigger boats consume tons of $$.

    Don't buy a boat unless you are prepared to replace every major system on the boat. You don't want to get stuck with a boat that you can't use because you can't afford the upkeep or repairs. A lot of people do and you see their boats rotting at the docks.

    Boats are a ton of fun and I could not live without mine, but it is a huge time and $$ suck, so if it is not a big priority in your life, you are going to end up hating your boat. If it is a big priority, then you will have a great adventure.

    Mike C
  19. Laurence

    Laurence Senior Member

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    And remember, a boat is not a liquid asset! If you buy the wrong one and don't love it, can't afford to maintain it, you still own it and generally it will take a long time to sell! $$$
  20. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    It has been my experience that anything older than 1980 will require a major or complete re-wire job. :( I bet the wiring on the bridge is suspect, and let's face it, until Cabo came along, the production sportfish manufacturerer's did not put alot of emphasis on quality electrical installations (no matter what my Hatteras buddies will say :).

    This is coming from a Pacifica/Hatteras/Post/Blackfin persepective. A $25K bargain can easily turn into a $250K project, but it can turn out to be a sweet boat with money wisely spent. Hint - think Cummins Recon engines for repowering needs.

    Just look at how little $250K buys you today on the new boat market, a couple of outboards and less than 36' loa???

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