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Review: Mochi Craft 75’ Long Range Cruiser

Discussion in 'Mochi Yacht' started by YachtForums, Mar 12, 2010.

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  1. Mochi Craft 75' Long Range Cruiser
    Boldly Going Green in the Deep Blue Scene

    by Capt. Chuck Gnaegy​

    The Green Generation in yachting is upon us and with great promise; Mochi Craft
    has quietly entered the basin with an innovative 75’ (23-meter) expedition cruiser unveiled at
    the Ft. Lauderdale Boat Show in 2009. Mochi’s approach to conscientious yachting leads the way
    into the future with the first green, clean, yacht propulsion system in the world, over 20 meters.​

    Its hybrid technology is designed for long term adventuring, with superlative, seaworthy performance in tune with Mother Earth. Her deep-down secret, artfully swashbuckled in this long range pleasure craft, is ZEM: Zero Emission Mode. With this brain-child of Norberto Ferretti, Mochi Craft has been the first and only yacht in the world to receive the RINA certification of “Green Star Clean Energy Clean Propulsion.” In conjunction with research by AYT Advanced Yacht Technology and Studio Zuccon International Project, Ferretti Group Design led by Andrea Frabetti has adapted cutting edge technology, merged dramatically with a legendary Italian flair.

    Her external lines confirm her allegiance to Mochi’s long admired Lobster Boats, Nordic ‘workboats’ with their sea-kindly hulls, plus prized interiors featuring natural woods and delightful, inviting decor. Yet her most astounding innovation is the ZEM. In addition to traditional diesel drives which transmit power directly to the propellers, a stunning hybrid technology extends the option for a “Zero Emission Mode.” That is, in which two voltaic engines – 70kW synchronous electric motors, powered by a succession of lithium ion batteries – are applied in series to the propeller shaft, engaging the reduction gears. ZEM becomes Mochi’s, Ferretti’s, Yachting’s astounding debut of 21st century techno-science.

    Ferretti’s patent on this process covers five separate modes:

    1. Diesel propulsion and energy storing: as the diesels handle normal propulsion, they also operate electric motors – as generators – which recharge the propulsion battery pack;

    2. Diesel-Electric: disengaged from the engines, the electric motors drive the propellers, powered by on-board generators and the battery pack;

    3. ZEM Propulsion: propellers powered by the electric motors for silent, zero emissions;

    4. ZEM Function: all on-board utilities are powered by the propulsion battery pack, for silent, zero-emissions, including air-conditioning; for no impact on local environment;

    5. Plug-In: While in port the propulsion battery pack is charged through shore power.

    ***​
  2. But below the boot stripe and that big break sheer line, another Ferretti advance for the Mochi is the FER.WEY: Ferretti Wave Efficient Yacht trans-planing hull, developed by AYT. It’s an unconventional bulbous bow arrangement with twin grooved propeller housings – adds to stability and good seakeeping. Ferretti claims this “trans-planing” innovation out-performs all other planing and displacement designs, in the intermediate speed range of 15-16 knots. For those others, as the hull reaches up to plane; the resulting “speed hump” occurs at 13-14 knots as, bow high, the stern is digging in. The Mochi’s advanced FER.WEY bypasses that longitudinal dynamic; the hull doesn’t “climb a hump” but smoothly bypasses it, attaining a 20-knot cruise, perfectly horizontal all the way.
  3. Aboard, it’s what you don’t see from this viewpoint that may be most important about the Mochi: her hull. From this overhead view, the Mochi’s spaciousness is notable for a 75’ yacht, with her top-notch steering station, her lounge area just forward of enormous sat-nav bulbs, her sky deck which features space enough for a country dance floor; to her forward lounge. Her foredeck displays a comfort volume to be appreciated by the complete entourage. And just forward, note her excellent anchoring set-up.
  4. This aft view shows how easy it is to appreciate the green star’s voluminous rear deck swim platform, safely reached by built-in stairs, which, underway, are readily closed off for safety and comfort in following seas. All around, the absence of sharply angled corners is conspicuous. Here again, silence is golden; all onboard utilities are powered via the propulsion battery pack, even while at anchor in a favorite cove; this includes air conditioning, boiler, ARG-- Anti Rolling Gyrostabilizers. Uncommonly quiet, zero emission functions throughout the yacht. Your dockside neighbors will love it.
  5. Her comfort zone extends forward, on deck, with heavily padded lounges, as designers chose to feature an unusual space, plus blended tones of vinyl-leatherwork over bleached teak decking, for visual spaciousness; individually offset by weatherproofed mahogany tables. Irresistible sunning platforms.
  6. An aft stairway leads to the flybridge and an additional helm station, along with sun-pads and seating. A wide-angle shot of the aft deck sky lounge welcomes party time at any hour of the day or evening. Twin lounges are moveable for night time soirées, or afternoon parties. Note the decorative but strong railings all around, plus extra-strength rail/banisters at the open staircase leading down.
  7. Taking advantage of all outdoor venues, her main aft deck follows the naturalness of a beige/brown treatment in furnishings of vinyl and leathers, deeply padded, for conversational nooks and outdoor socializing. Overhead spot lighting brightens the gathering when needed.
  8. Generously endowed with the very latest in nav-com gear and handsomely designed, the Mochi’s helm is open, accessible, yet perfectly utilitarian for long or short range cruising. Its well-groomed layout again echoes the light, tanned leatherwork and naturally finished woods in her excellent instrument display. Just aft of the helm station is an L-shaped leather divan, with a teak table and writing desk. Also a day head. The Captain’s cabin is adjacent. Above, her flybridge also boasts a complete helm station with an electronically controlled dash, plus a sun pad, and the 18’ inflatable dinghy.
  9. Through sliding glass doors, designed with an exacting precision yet opening to a marvellously open space, her main Salon opens first to her galley. With her great complement of gleaming white food-prep countertops, as well as stainless steel double-door refrigerator-freezers, the Mochi is completely equipped for full meals or snacks, for long range cruising. The crew may easily reach the galley from a large area astern, set aside, without disturbing guests. A central countertop allows easy transfer of prepared foods to the dining area.
  10. Just across the polished teak floor from the galley, a breakfast-snack table with white vinyl seating for four or five; handy for breakfasts, snacks, or midnight raids and a light repast. Tucked back, out of the way, it offers a handy break area for quiet conversations or board games.
  11. An alternate view of the dinette also shows the decorative treatment of the Mochi’s staircase; a quick avenue to the upper deck, not using a lot of space. Nicely designed to provide utilitarian movement without obstruction.
  12. On the main deck, aft in her spacious cockpit, the Mochi’s well decorated Salon offers the amenities of an offshore apartment. While full carpeting is optional, this owner has chosen to keep to the simple role. Close-up here shows the raised dining area, seating, extended, up to eight around an oval mahogany table, over a striped oak floor. Chairs, while comfortable, are kept to a light weight, utilitarian range.
  13. Forward in the salon we note, in the long view, the previous scene of the dining area, for comparison with this close-up, well decorated and comfortable full salon. This room easily accommodates up to eleven happy cruise partyers. Light grey and off-white shades render a more commodious feel, while expressing the easy comfort aura. White vinyl covering on the vast array of couches adds to the open but crisp, clean character, over the dappled grey carpet. At starboard, a 32” hideaway TV LCD is built-in.
  14. On the Mochi’s lower deck, her Master Suite, amidships, continues the light, bright feel of decor, perhaps adding visual scope to her well balanced roominess. Fully beam wide, it boasts bright windows on both sides, flooding the space with daylight. On one side the windows highlight a white full size leather couch while the opposite beam has a business desk with drawers.
  15. There’s a walk-in wardrobe, plus a large bathroom sporting an alabaster sink and fashionable stainless steel fixtures, with a large vanity over. The separate shower has a seating arrangement, plus mosaic wall decor. Flooring and walls are richly designed in striped teak and maple.
  16. Forward, the VIP Suite presents a queen size raised berth, nestled into the ship’s bow anatomy, yet, with steps, easy to mount. Her decor repeats the rich pattern of woods and veneers used throughout the yacht, warm and welcoming, curved corners. The stateroom is also fully carpeted, welcoming with opening window shades port and starboard.
  17. Also nestled within the ship’s forward anatomy, the VIP takes full advantage of the altered space to sport a swooping, curved shower door, clear glass, along with alabaster sink and stainless fixtures. The shower is stand-up, but also has a seating option. With Ferretti’s Mochi options, the owner may decide on three guest cabins, or two, with separate housekeeping functions, such as a laundry, washer-dryer, pantry and extra freezer space, all handy for extended voyaging. Crew Quarters are accessible from the cockpit; a twin cabin with head/shower.
  18. Mochi’s largish (for a 75-footer) engine room is laid out with precision, housing the several functions she delivers in her complicated, but readily understood arrangement to go green. Tested in the Potsdam Naval test tank after studies at the CFD Computational Fluid Dynamics, her traditional diesels transmit power directly to the propellers, but in Zero Emission Mode she is driven by her two 7kW synchronous electric motors. She also sports variable ratio, fly-by-wire steering and twin anti-rolling gyro stabilizers, the ARGs.
  19. Designed to enjoy long voyages at sea, Mochi's new 75' LRC is at the core of a revolutionary direction. Perhaps the most welcome change is in quietude for passengers, and neighboring yachts in the harbor.

    Mochi’s 75’ Long Range Cruiser is a true harbinger of enviable change.​


    <end>

    by Capt. Chuck Gnaegy​

    Specifications:

    Length: Overall length 23,71 m / 77 ft. 9 in.
    Beam: 6,57 m / 21 ft. 7 in
    Depth under props: 1,56 m / 5 ft. 1 in.
    Displacement unladen: 75,50 ton. / 166449 lbs.
    Displacement laden: 87,20 ton. / 192251 lbs.
    Max. number of persons: 18
    Design category: CE 2003/44 A
    Certification modules: B + F + Aa (sound emission) + Green Yacht - RINA S.p.A.

    Technical:

    2 x MAN D0836 LE 423 power 550 mhp / 404 kW at 2600 rpm (std)
    2 x MAN R6 800 CR power 800 mhp / 588 kW at 2300 rpm (opt)
    Hull type: transplanning FER.WEY (Ferretti Wave Efficient Yacht)
    Overall height from keel to radar arch: 7,92 m / 26 ft. 0 in.
    Fuel tank capacity: 7800 lt. / 2061 US gals.
    Water tanks capacity: 2000 lt./ 528 US gals.

    For more information contact:

    Mochi Craft
    Ferretti S.p.A.
    Via Ansaldo, 9/B
    47100 Forlì - Italy
    www.mochicraft-yacht.com

    ***​
  20. Details

    One final leap into the future: Mochi’s bulbous bow and twin-grooved propeller wells in her hull design also project, perhaps, advances in cruising which may become a trademark. According to Ferretti, the FER.WEY hull is the result of years of research and development by AYT. Described as a "trans-planing" hull, it enables the hull to cruise efficiently in the intermediate 'hump' range where both planing and displacement hulls generally behave abnormally. The FER.WEY design is claimed to reduce the typical roll experienced by displacement hulls and improves static stability by up to 50%.
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