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Naval Architecture

Discussion in 'Yacht Designers Discussion' started by Aeolos, Jan 20, 2009.

  1. Aeolos

    Aeolos New Member

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    Hi!

    Next year I'm planning to study Naval Architecture, but I would like to know the difficulties of this job. Can a naval architect design a yacht (I mean the exterior lines), or is he/she responsible for the mechanical parts only? Also, I don't know what are the chances to get a job as well as the financial part. Not many people know anything about this field and I thought that this was a good place to gather some info.

    Thanks in advance..
  2. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Associate

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    Hello Aeolos, welcome to Yacht Forums. You have come to a good place and I believe others who are much more experienced will assist you in your quest for this knowledge.
  3. PFJW

    PFJW New Member

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    There is no reason why not.

    There are a number of high profile companies that do both naval architecture and exterior styling - Ed Dubois, Martin Francis, Espen Øino - for example.
  4. brunick

    brunick Senior Member

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    not to miss lars modin
  5. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Thanks Jannick, although I am not a Naval Architect I am now again drawing up a new hull. This is for our new 54 that is in need of something avant-garde.

    I think what you can learn as a NA is always good to know. This doesn´t make you a designer unless you have a talent for it. I have students applying for job positions every second week and it is just a few I would consider as designers even if several are mastering all kinds of software and are making excellent renderings. It seems as most schools are more into the technical aspects than the art of designing a yacht. (BTW, I work alone in a network, no employees).

    You can describe it as the difference between a musician and a composer if you like. Not all have talent for both.

    My advice for anybody entering this field is to get some hands-on practise on a superyacht, it is a lot to learn about how to maintain and handle a yacht, as well as the lifestyle of the owners. Something you can not learn in school and that few designers have experienced in real life, until they have built a couple of yachts. Which is in the wrong order...;)
  6. SAB

    SAB New Member

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    I find that with Naval Architecture courses there seems to be an essential element missing from their curriculum- Aesthetics; teaching skills to better understand what creates balance and style in hull and superstructures, sketching and ideation techniques. It doesn't matter what type of vessel, ie Superyachts, Warships, Fast Ferry's, Tugs etc... they all can benefit from aesthetic improvement- the marketing of the vessels will be easier the better they look. Transportation design courses are excellent because they all have this intense study area, and this is why a majority of Yacht Stylists come from this background.
  7. Aeolos

    Aeolos New Member

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    Thanks for the quick response! :)

    I always like to draw yacht profiles on a paper.. you can see my Top-100 yachts album here: http://rides.webshots.com/album/566735261NBUaBw?start=0

    The fact that makes me think whether I am going to study NA or not is the chances of getting a job.. I know that there aren't many jobs for naval architects or yacht designers, or, at least, there isn't need for "more" yacht designers (or am I wrong?). So that makes it hard for the "newbies" as they have no credibility, which plays a big role in this field..(?) Maybe someone who works as a naval arch. or yacht designer can tell me how hard is it to find a job, or how long does it take after finishing studies to find one?

    However, I'm more interested in designing the exterior of a yacht rather than finding the best hull shape, but I have no problem in doing both ;).
  8. SAB

    SAB New Member

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    This would make studies in Industrial Design or a specialist Transport Design course a better avenue for you to pursue.
  9. Aeolos

    Aeolos New Member

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    ...however, that means that I will not have other alternatives.. Studying NA, you can do many things, including jobs that have to do with ship repairing (I don't know how is it called), that can give you both immediate workplace and enough money, fields I don't like very much, as they have nothing to do with designing. But if I don't manage to find a job as a yacht designer, I will have to think of these alternatives..
  10. CODOG

    CODOG Senior Member

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    I'd say the best Naval Architects have some styling and design flair.
    I'd also say that the best designers and stylists have a good knowledge of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering etc etc. The lack of either is not necessarily going to stop you getting a job, but will limit long term advancement and responsibilities. We are talking about a life-long career here after all ?
    Take it from me, a designer or stylist can have enormous input in a project without having a lot of accountability, whereas a Naval Architect can have a large amount of accountability yet not enjoy as much of the limelight when the project has its ribbon cut....this is reflected in the bias toward qualifications for NA's and ability for designers and stylists, and the rather odd level of industry standard wages.
    In an ideal world however, each of these disciplines should be augmented by hands-on practical experience whether its in a build yard environment or boat ownership or even a drawing office that has an in-built culture of nurturing and passing on expertise and knowledge. A good graduate can become a great NA or designer as long as they realise that real learning starts when University ends.

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