Click For Dockwise
Click for Cape Scott
Click for MCC
Click for DeAngelo
Click for Llebroc
Click for Moonen
Go Back   YachtForums.Com > YACHT & BOAT FORUMS > Motor Yachts > Unique, Custom or New Yachts > Charter Yacht Seafaris burns and sinks

Login to YachtForums
Username
Password

Reply

Charter Yacht Seafaris burns and sinks

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-14-2008, 11:28 AM   #1 (permalink)
YF News Associate
 
Yacht News's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Caribbean
Posts: 12,408
Charter Yacht Seafaris burns and sinks

What mega yacht is 41 M in length, has three guest decks and is on a catamaran hull? Not to let your thought process wander any farther, the answer to this question would have to be the double hulled Seafaris. Seafaris emerged entirely to the public in 2006 and later was put on the charter market through a notable brokerage company.

Seafaris is not the first mega yacht to be platformed upon a double hull or catamaran hull. However, it is not every day that we see this application being thrust into use in terms of in the mega yacht realm. The Seafaris clearly has adopted this form of hull for her ocean-going adventures.

The 41 M luxury catamaran was built by Forgacs Shipyard in Australia and she currently offers charters in the Great Barrier Reef region. Her interiors feature a litany of materials that appeal to the sensory capacities of her guests. Some of them include stitched leather, Australian Jarrah wood, cream suede as well as a number of artworks.

Owing to the fact that the Seafaris carries a maximum of 10 guests, her accommodation plan calls for a Master and several guests rooms. In particular, there is one Master Stateroom and four guest cabins. That is, two guests in each guest room and two in the master.

The master room is located forward on the Main-Deck and is generous in physical space as well as well appointed. The rich local woods beckon depth while the light colour and texture of carpet and headliners suggests a perfect contrast. Apart from the palette of colours in the space, there is a large king-size bed, additional seating, closet storage, owner’s study and off course a large ‘pop-up’ flat screen.

Additionally, there is a large marble ensuite that reflects the rich dark woods and light opulent marble. Double sink marble vanity abounds with stainless steel accessories. There is also a large high-jet Jacuzzi with commanding seaward views. The guest rooms are well appointed as well and endow guests in a luxurious atmosphere.

The four guest rooms are located on the Main-Deck as well and offer commanding views through the expansive windows. These rooms are equal in spaciousness each equates in a luxurious appeal. They all feature, king size beds, settees, writing alcoves and entertainment systems. Two of these rooms have the versatility to convert into double rooms. There are also, ensuite showers that reflect similar materials and colours. Double basins, art work and frosted glass door to the stand up shower and stainless steel accessories abound.

Here are some statistics on the Seafaris:

LOA: 41.0 M
BOA: 11.0M
Draught: 2.1M
Engines: 2 X CAT 2,250 HP
Speed: 16 knots
Accommodation: 1 X Master, 4 X guests
Builder: Forgacs Shipyard, Australia

For more on the Seafaris luxury charter yacht visit the builder or yacht’s website at:

http://www.forgacs.com.au/shipconstruction.htm

http://seafarisaustralia.com/index.html

Name:  sefaris_charter.jpg
Views: 888
Size:  58.8 KB
Yacht News is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 08:20 PM   #2 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 4
SY Seafaris burns and sinks off Queensland coast

This happened this morning and it's currently 11.15am:
Super yacht Seafaris burns and sinks off Cairns, passengers and crew jump to safety - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
sussurro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 03:07 AM   #3 (permalink)
YF News Associate
 
Yacht News's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Caribbean
Posts: 12,408
You got to it before me. This is such a sad sight...for any yacht to burn or suffer other mishaps.
Yacht News is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 07:34 AM   #4 (permalink)
Publisher/Admin
 
YachtForums's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Florida
Posts: 17,997
This is the first time I've seen this Press Release. Like most PR's, they're so boated on BS, the aroma penetrates your computer monitor. This PR on Seafaris was posted by Ron before I hired him as YF's new editor. Now all news goes through an editorial review before it is published. I have now edited the post.
YachtForums is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 07:37 AM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
K1W1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: My Office
Posts: 6,004
Hi,

Here is a video news clip.

Sixteen people flee burning yacht off Cairns - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

I find it ironic how the restrictions all over the reef are targeted at keeping big boats out of anywhere neat and it is a local boat that dumps its guts into the sea.

The video should be a good visual for those who question the use of Steel over FRP for a yacht.
K1W1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 10:37 AM   #6 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 777
Quote:
Originally Posted by K1W1 View Post
Hi,

Here is a video news clip.

Sixteen people flee burning yacht off Cairns - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

I find it ironic how the restrictions all over the reef are targeted at keeping big boats out of anywhere neat and it is a local boat that dumps its guts into the sea.

The video should be a good visual for those who question the use of Steel over FRP for a yacht.
I'm so thankful the people were smart enough to immediately abandon ship. I remember when I was only 13 or so, a small boat on a lake burning like that and the one thing I learned was how quickly the fire would spread on a fiberglass boat.
olderboater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 10:49 AM   #7 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
K1W1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: My Office
Posts: 6,004
Quote:
Originally Posted by olderboater View Post
I'm so thankful the people were smart enough to immediately abandon ship.
Hi,

Lucky they had something to abandon into as they are well inside the Saltwater Croc and Shark areas of FNQ.
K1W1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2013, 09:45 PM   #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by K1W1 View Post
I find it ironic how the restrictions all over the reef are targeted at keeping big boats out of anywhere neat and it is a local boat that dumps its guts into the sea.
A big boat "dumping its guts" would be even worse.


Quote:
The video should be a good visual for those who question the use of Steel over FRP for a yacht.
They'd still have been jumping overboard with a steel hull.
Chapstick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2013, 10:02 PM   #9 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Dans la merde très très profondes
Posts: 419
Didn't realize this thread was up title rather innocuous ... but thanks for all the great info.

This is sad to hear.
Fire at sea is very serious business. As I remember the yacht was aluminum but may have had a fiberglass superstructure. Scary how far down and bad shape... thought aluminum hull might hold up better.

Anyway was on a Navy ship with a boiler room fire in rather heavy seas... turned out very minor but really scary time for awhile. Later we had a main steam line crack and that was more scary for awhile... managed to isolate and get to port.

You are on your own at sea... help is not an emergency call away.

Fire on a yacht just is really scary as they are packed full of beautiful but easily ignited decor, crews and damage control fire fighting is very much not up to naval standards... plus the presence of guests must inordinately complicate matters.

Really important the cause and modes get out asap to protect the yachting community from being unaware or unprepared.
karo1776 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2013, 11:20 PM   #10 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
rcrapps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Jax FL
Posts: 1,511
Quote:
Originally Posted by karo1776 View Post
Really important the cause and modes get out asap to protect the yachting community from being unaware or unprepared.
Ah, There's da rub; What happened, how was it addressed, How fast were the correct decisions made. Can we learn and improve other fleets.
Glad to hear all folks are o k. Sad for a well liked ship.
,rc
rcrapps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2013, 10:01 AM   #11 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Dans la merde très très profondes
Posts: 419
Seafairis apparently burned down quite quickly and people escaped in their skivvies...

What caused it is not generally known, could be most anything from smoking in bed to spontaneous combustion of some kind. So we do not know what caused the fire.

Some comments Seafairis was a aluminum hulled fiberglass polyester superstructure.
What we do know is it burned quickly and burned to the waterline and sunk.

No matter what caused it and the actions that were taken or not taken if fighting the fire, the boat was reduced to the waterline and sunk. That is scary.

Glass fiber polyester boats this is the usual result of a serious fire. Now this was an aluminum hulled boat with the composite superstructure... and the result is the same.

Happen to visiting my brother. And, talking with my brother who is now retired but was until fairly recently Northrop Grumman's leading grey beard on composite process engineering and total quality management through most of the modern development of composite aircraft components and structures... he made some interesting comments:

First, polyester resin systems are very poor in fire protection they ignite easily and burn hot with much toxic combustion products. They are not allowed in aircraft due to these issues and the outgassing of toxic chemicals.

Epoxy resin composites are much better in fact the ignition temperatures are around 1200 degrees F. But they also can outgas toxic chemicals but that is resin dependent. All resin systems used in aircraft are "low smoke" and do not outgas toxic chemicals or make much smoke. The effect in a fire is charing not outright combustion as in polyester and other not fire safe resin systems. This makes the resin and the resulting composite structures self extinguishing which the epoxies are.

The fiber used and process used in making a composite structure also effect the fire safety. Glass fibers can melt in the high temperatures of a fire. Even when used with a safe resin system... the resin chars but the glass melts leading to failure. This does not happen with Kevlar and Graphite... they have similar results in a fire... they char but do not melt or burn. Graphite you must remember is produced by pyrolysis polyacrylicnitrile "PAN" fibers.

"A common method of manufacture involves heating the spun PAN filaments to approximately 300 °C in air, which breaks many of the hydrogen bonds and oxidizes the material. The oxidized PAN is then placed into a furnace having an inert atmosphere of a gas such as argon, and heated to approximately 2000 °C, which induces graphitization of the material, changing the molecular bond structure. When heated in the correct conditions, these chains bond side-to-side (ladder polymers), forming narrow graphene sheets which eventually merge to form a single, columnar filament. The result is usually 93–95% carbon. Lower-quality fiber can be manufactured using pitch or rayon as the precursor instead of PAN."

The process applied to advance composite structures in aircraft practice reduces the resin content and improves fire safety. The structures are well consolidated and have low resin to fiber ratios.

Now in my early engineering career my expertise was air crash safety. So I know these are rigidly tested and the certification is strict. This is a safety of life issue as crashes often result in very bad fires. From my personal observation the comments he makes bear out. Certainly steel structures perform well but second best is carbon and kevlar composite structures. The worst are polyester.

Now when a fire happens in the boating world... my thoughts are its crazy to construct yachts out of polyester resin systems and with high resin to fiber ratios. It would be preferable to use graphite or kevlar and low smoke epoxy resin.

Why is boats can sink far from help... and fire is the worst emergency at sea.
karo1776 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2013, 10:27 AM   #12 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 777
I did see this in a couple of articles, which doesn't address cause but, if accurate, would narrow it some. Of course early reports sometimes are inaccurate too.

"The McCloy Group, the holding company that owns Seafaris, has issued a statement confirming that the fire started in the vessel’s engine room."

Makes me also wonder if there wasn't an explosion involved. That would help account for the speed and the sinking.
olderboater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2013, 11:12 AM   #13 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
K1W1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: My Office
Posts: 6,004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chapstick View Post

They'd still have been jumping overboard with a steel hull.
Hi,

Maybe but I don't think it would have all turned to custard as quickly if it were a steel boat.
K1W1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2013, 05:30 PM   #14 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Dans la merde très très profondes
Posts: 419
K1W1 is right... steel is best for fire protection and safety.

Composites can be very safe in fires and preventing heat transmission... if made of the right stuff and I give reentry heat shields as the ultimate example!

Now if the fire started in the engine rooms it seems some form of automatic fire fighting system should have deployed.

As Seafaris was an aluminum hulled catamaran the engine rooms might not have been as accessible as conventional mono hulled boats... and there would be two (one in each hull). The Cat 3516s I understand were installed are massive engines with little probability of fire issues.

But we don't know what kind of connecting vents or opening were between the engine rooms and the superstructure so we don't know about fire stops... nor any of the details other than the own believes the fire started in an engine room.

So hopefully those details will become public... as opposed to the Yogi investigation... but in this case at least it appears good reason to abandon ship rapidly.
karo1776 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2013, 06:00 PM   #15 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
I'll admit to having only a superficial understanding of the following, and I don't have time at the moment to understand it better, but I'll just leave it here for others with more knowledge than myself to comment on:

Quote:
Because of the high heat conduction rates of the major construction metals (steel and aluminium) alternative materials based on phenolic resin composites have recently (since the mid 1990’s) become available.

Steel has a thermal conductivity 200 times higher than phenolic composite material and aluminium 750 times higher. This conductivity leads to high heat transfer. In the case of aluminium, the more heat-resistant alloys (I.E.: those that resist the flow of heat through them, and whose bulk temperature therefore rises more quickly) begin to lose their mechanical properties above 100oC, reducing to between 50% and 70% of initial strength by 200oC and 20% to 30% by 300oC.

This can lead to catastrophic failure of a ship's superstructure, since in a real fire, aluminium alloys will melt somewhere between 600oC to 700oC and contribute to the fire with fierce burning themselves. This was demonstrated during the Falklands war onboard several vessels, including the RFA SIR GALAHAD.

Phenolic composite materials are therefore finding application in lightweight structures on board high-speed craft, passenger vessels and submarines due to significant strength-to-weight ratios together with high fire-resistant integrity and low emissions of smoke and toxic fumes.
What are phenolic composites?
Chapstick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are EST. The time now is 02:35 PM.

Click for Lurssen
Click for Ocean Alexander
Click for McConaghy
Click for Elling
Click for Alexseal
Click for Oceanco


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2