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Towing a tender. Your thoughts?

 
 
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Old 07-31-2006, 01:10 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Towing a tender. Your thoughts?

I have an 8' Rib which I carry on the deck of my 50 bertram but it is a royal pain to lift it out by myself (after I take the Johnson 15hp off). I also have a 13' Boston Whaler which my wife & kids prefer. Question: have you ever seen someone tow a 13' Whaler at around 22 kts? I figure I could make up a "Y" to attach to both stern cleats & then run the line back to the Whalers bow eye. I figure 1/2 to 3/4" line would do the trick. Do you see any problems with this? Any ideas?
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Old 07-31-2006, 01:26 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I have done it, but not in the open sea. The problem is if the weather changes so you will get more water in than goes out, the Whaler will be very heavy and difficult to keep centered behind. A good cover may prevent this.

You should also check the bow eye, maybe an additional is needed. We got a tougher one fitted just above the water line. And you should tow at a distance in meter corresponding to the speed, like 10 m at 10 knots, 20 at 20 knots.

The real problem however comes if you will have to recover the boat in a heavy sea...!?
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Old 07-31-2006, 02:58 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I would only be towing this in Long Island Sound. Seas are normally 1-3'. It can get very rough in bad weather but I wouldn't be out with the kids in that anyway. There wouldn't be an option of recovering it & getting on board if the going gets rough.
I didn't think of the water getting into it. I'll hook up a bilge pump.
You feel the 22kt cruise is ok?
Thanks
Dave
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Old 07-31-2006, 03:02 PM   #4 (permalink)
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boston whaler

I tow our 13ft boston whaler (great boat) but we don't go as fast.

We cruise at 10 knots and normally the boston sits on the bow but sometimes we just throw it off the stern. At ten knots it is almost planing so it actually keeps the nose well up. Don't forget to lift the engine and remove the self drain plug. At a guess at 20 knots you'll kick out a good size wake so make sure you use a long line to get the boat way out of the wash.

I would suggest getting a stronger eye made up on the bow.
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Old 07-31-2006, 06:01 PM   #5 (permalink)
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We used to tow an 11 whaler around Nantucket Sound behind a bertram 28 and the problem we had when going fast it would start steering side to side and almost flip, especially when it got near the wake. We solved this by towing a hawser with a loop in behind the whaler. I have towed small tenders at slow speed behinds yachts with no problem, you might also try leaving the engine down and locked in place.
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Old 07-31-2006, 08:46 PM   #6 (permalink)
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towing a tender at high speed

my experience is that towing tenders is a risky affair. at the speed you are intending to pull, you will be looking for trouble!!!

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Old 08-01-2006, 04:54 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ychtcptn
We used to tow an 11 whaler around Nantucket Sound behind a bertram 28 and the problem we had when going fast it would start steering side to side and almost flip, especially when it got near the wake. We solved this by towing a hawser with a loop in behind the whaler. I have towed small tenders at slow speed behinds yachts with no problem, you might also try leaving the engine down and locked in place.
Randy is right about leaving the engine down. As a matter of fact, our insurance company requires that we have ours down.
You will want to rig your tow line so that the boat rides on the back side of your stern wave at your preferred cruising speed. This will stop it from surfing. I would also use nylon line (maybe two lengths of 30'-50') to make your "Y" and then use spectra for the remaining length of the tow line. The nylon will give you some strectch for shock absorption and the spectra will be lighter and easier to store. You should also use a reinforced pad-eye on the whaler. Additionally, it would be a good idea to have a short line (about 5') which stays with the Whaler all the time. That way when you are hooking up the tow, you don't have to lean all the way over the bow. You can just clip your tow line to it.
These are just some things that I've learned while towing tens of thousands of miles.
Good Luck,
Ken
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Old 08-02-2006, 10:03 AM   #8 (permalink)
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My experience is higher speed means longer distance to the tender.
I place the tender in front of the third or fourth wave (almost at the bottom) And NOT in the centerline! like 3-4ft to one side of it.

Front end of a wave from the boat itself helps surf the tender forward and the ofcenter-trick keeps it away from (in my case) the 600hp of water rushing away from my stern. (1-2 knot difference for me)


If it's possible to lock the steeringweel of the tender, parhaps you can lower the powertrim so only the bottomfin of the engine is in the water and helps it from going from side to side, this wouldn't make to much resistance in the water!
( Never had that problem but maby Whalers has quite flat hull!? )
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Old 08-02-2006, 12:08 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Dave,

A Whaler is only good for one thing... exchanging horizontal velocity for vertical trajectory! If you're towing a Whaler at 22 knots... behind a 50' Bertram... your son is missing a whole lotta fun.

How is he suppose to follow in his father's footsteps if you don't let him prove a Whaler is unsinkable? Isn't this you in the picture below? Like father, like son...

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Old 08-02-2006, 01:50 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Dave--
Can't help weighing in here since this thread has devolved to Whaler Tales.

You haven't lived 'til your '60s vintage 13 falls off the front of a wave in the entrance to Port Everglades and she stuffs really good.
With presence of mind to quickly pull the drain plug and enough luck for the 20 Merc not to quit, you gingerly cruise around dewatering the boat and to retrieve the extra gas tank and the dead fish caught earlier and hope nobody saw what happened.

Not that I would ever admit this actually happened to me...
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Old 08-02-2006, 02:04 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren Schweizer
Not that I would ever admit this actually happened to me...
I'll admit it...

Have I flipped a Whaler? Yes, but the hard part wasn't bailing out the boat... it was coming up with an excuse to keep from getting grounded by my parents! Would I do it again? Hmmm... the chance of meeting a cute nurse doesn't outweigh the taste of hospital food anymore, so... probably not.
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Old 08-02-2006, 03:24 PM   #12 (permalink)
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As a matter of fact Carl, if you look closely at that picture, you will see the tow line behind my old race boat. We would tow the whaler during the race "just in case"
I know I'm going to hear "daddy, I want to ride on the whaler" when it's behind us.
Quote:
Originally Posted by YachtForums
Dave,

A Whaler is only good for one thing... exchanging horizontal velocity for vertical trajectory! If you're towing a Whaler at 22 knots... behind a 50' Bertram... your son is missing a whole lotta fun.

How is he suppose to follow in his father's footsteps if you don't let him prove a Whaler is unsinkable? Isn't this you in the picture below? Like father, like son...

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Old 08-02-2006, 03:25 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren Schweizer
Dave--
Can't help weighing in here since this thread has devolved to Whaler Tales.

You haven't lived 'til your '60s vintage 13 falls off the front of a wave in the entrance to Port Everglades and she stuffs really good.
With presence of mind to quickly pull the drain plug and enough luck for the 20 Merc not to quit, you gingerly cruise around dewatering the boat and to retrieve the extra gas tank and the dead fish caught earlier and hope nobody saw what happened.

Not that I would ever admit this actually happened to me...
LOL!!! I would pay to see that!!!! Not that it ever happend to you though
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Old 09-07-2009, 09:28 PM   #14 (permalink)
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towing a tender

I've had good luck towing my 11' inflatable tender at speeds of up to about 20 knots in 2 to 3' seas, but it really seams to be happier at about 17 knots. I usually leave the engine down just far enough to provide steering stability, and the only time I towed with it all the way down, the engine got flooded internally with sea water that got forced up through the salt water cooling system and entered the engine through an exhaust valve that was open. The engine got hydro locked which I cured by removing the spark plugs and turning it over. The engine also required a couple of oil changes as the sump was full of water as well. Fortunately it's been running fine ever since.
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Old 09-08-2009, 12:10 PM   #15 (permalink)
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We tow ours regularly. A 32' center console behind a 36m money pit. Outboards **ALWAYS** out of the water.

The search button will also yield prior discussions on the topic:
http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/te...ghlight=towing

(with picks too!!)
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