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Proteksan & Turquoise Superyacht "Yogi" Sinks!

 
 
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:19 PM   #76 (permalink)
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I agree, and i said exactly that... plus, the delivery crew is likely to have been small but rested... on a charter the rotation is much more intense and the workload is incredibly higher... I seriously doubt the 8 crewman was the problem or even made any difference...
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:33 PM   #77 (permalink)
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Hi,

It might surprise you to learn that boats need to be cleaned inside and out regularly even with no guests onboard.

If there are no Stewies on the team who do you think is going to do the Laundry for the Crew?

The idea of everyone doing their own working gear is not one I have encountered in a long time.

The last time I was on a boat where we washed our own gear it was done in a bucket on deck and rinsed out by being towed behind - This was on a 50ft Sailboat crossing the Pacific in 1983.

The use of the Laundry by everyone is not something I would encourage given how I have seen some non caring individuals use laundry equipment.
Most of the yachts I worked on, we could go about a week on a delivery without touching the inside, especially if it was rough, there was no reason to clean the inside......

We all did our own personal laundry on the yachts I've worked on, even the large ones, how else do you keep track of whose is whose......

I definately agree about the way complete idiots do laundry. On a 105' we picked up "twinkletoes" a 19 year old male steward, 1 time he tried to put about 4 loads worth of his laundry into an apartment size crew washer and dryer.......after he went to bed and his crap still wasn't dry, I put it on for another 120 minutes, and it still wasn't dry......I took it out of the dryer and dumped it all very damp on top of his comforter. Then, in the main laundry on the boat, he put so much soap that the front loader shut off and the alarm was going off on it, it wouldn't let us open the door until we shut the breaker off, and then had to shopvac the 1/2 bottle of soap he put into it out of it.......needless to say, I was second Captain just for the voyage from Ft. laud to St. Maarten, he ended up flying home the day after I did, even though the owner was flying in the following day and they NEEDED a steward(ess) for the owner......

As for 8 crew, it's way too light on that size for a delivery longer than 24 hours. That boat really should have 3 on watch at a time.......in order to get proper sleep, have someone cook meals, and enough crew awake to check on things and/or do damage control, they should be running 3 crew with 6 hours on 12 hours off.......or 4 hrs on and 8 off.......so that equals 9 crew minimum in my book........10 would be even better so there's 1 dedicated just to meals and odds and ends.....such as interior cleaning......laundry.....who knows......
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Old 02-24-2012, 12:28 AM   #78 (permalink)
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salvage???

I was wondering,how deep the water is where the sinking took place. access by divers etc. to find out what happened and maybe raise her?
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Old 02-24-2012, 02:48 AM   #79 (permalink)
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Damaged Hull

Is it just me or does it look like some bad damage on the bottom of the hull in the third pic? The keel looks like it has had its paint scraped off and a rather big crack beneath it. Kind of looks like there is water coming out of that crack as well..
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Old 02-24-2012, 02:49 AM   #80 (permalink)
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newest rumours and comments on number of crew

i have heard from somebody who has direct contact with the captain that he has said there was a very loud sound as if they have hit something and the water was coming in from the stabilizer. they have looked for a container in the area, but there was nothing.

the commercial ships of 18000 teu in take capacity work with 13 crew and there are a lot of issues to do onboard in comparison to a yacht having a delivery voyage. for a delivery voyage you would need enough crew to keep a decent watch and some more people to take care of crews' needs; so 8 is definitely should suffice.

as to technical competence of the yard; i have not been on board of yogi, but other ships build by proteksan and i have found the quality in the engine room par with most other superyacht builders in western europe.

all in all there is still some ay to go in order to achieve to a conclusion for what has really happened.
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:21 AM   #81 (permalink)
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i have heard from somebody who has direct contact with the captain that he has said there was a very loud sound as if they have hit something and the water was coming in from the stabilizer. they have looked for a container in the area, but there was nothing.
I have lightened up the pictures posted here and it looks like it can be two dents forward of the stabilizer..? Submarine..?
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Old 02-24-2012, 04:36 AM   #82 (permalink)
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Or a container might have sunk after the impact?

There are so many of the things floating around the oceans that the likelihood of hitting a submarine are probably less than that of hitting a container.
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:58 AM   #83 (permalink)
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Hi,

I received an e mail last night from someone with direct knowledge of the sinking.

There was no mention of hitting anything in it, it did say a loss of power from overheating and failed exhaust bellows resulted in the loss and a Door on maindeck aft was stove in by waves while they were rolling around deadship.

As the guy who sent me this wasn't onboard I will have to treat the info with caution but it is a further expansion of the overheat/ bellows failure mentioned previously.

I am still at a loss to understand how an overheating engine could get so far down the track with no one noticing that the chain of events was irreversible and resulted in a total loss.

Even if running UMS there should have been a number of ways for the engine or exhaust to announce itself to the AMS long before failure.
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Old 02-24-2012, 06:50 AM   #84 (permalink)
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Even if running UMS there should have been a number of ways for the engine or exhaust to announce itself to the AMS long before failure.
I have seen this on other vessels with the rubber exhaust bellows installed. The raw water gets cut off some how and before the engine gets to alarm point, the rubber exhaust bellows melts or catches fire.
Last time I have seen this happen (about 6 months ago) is when the raw water intake pipes where infested with muscles the size of your pinky nail.
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Old 02-24-2012, 06:58 AM   #85 (permalink)
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I have seen this on other vessels with the rubber exhaust bellows installed. The raw water gets cut off some how and before the engine gets to alarm point, the rubber exhaust bellows melts or catches fire.
Last time I have seen this happen (about 6 months ago) is when the raw water intake pipes where infested with muscles the size of your pinky nail.
Hi,

If the raw water intake pipes were blocked so badly surely there was a reduction in flow of water to anything that was served by that SW Rail that should have announced itself via the AMS
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Old 02-24-2012, 12:06 PM   #86 (permalink)
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I have seen this on other vessels with the rubber exhaust bellows installed. The raw water gets cut off some how and before the engine gets to alarm point, the rubber exhaust bellows melts or catches fire.
Last time I have seen this happen (about 6 months ago) is when the raw water intake pipes where infested with muscles the size of your pinky nail.
While some smaller boats do not have exhaust alarms I can t believe larger yachts don't!

Usually when you experience partial or conplete raw water flow, the first indication will be the transmission temp creeping up before the engine coolant. It may not alarm right away by a decent helmsman should notice
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Old 02-24-2012, 12:54 PM   #87 (permalink)
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Compensators can fail if there is a loss of water going to the mixer. Two interesting points if this happens. First if the mixer is not getting water there is a good chance the engine isn't either, therefore alarms should be going off everywhere with an overheating engine. Secondly, a compensator is typically installed above waterline. If it were to fail, I can't picture that much water coming to sink a vessel of this size.
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Old 02-27-2012, 07:31 PM   #88 (permalink)
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Hi all,

The 8 crew are part of the regular crew on board, all of whom are french. They were managing a trip from a scheduled drydock service in Turkey towards berth in Greece. According to AIS info, they were running in stealth mode during the time of the incident, the first call was made at 00:30hours (Hellanic coast guard time) and because of the bad weather the rescue attempts were started at 07:30, and the manufacturer was informed during the 7 hours waiting time of the incident, as you might have read from the words of their spokesperson, the bellows broke off but there is a shut-off valve right underneath. Another thing mentioned in the primary reports is that the captain was warned of bad weather (which I don't think would cause such a disaster on its own). Under the waterline of the ship there are two aft holding tanks for the swiming pool located aft on the weather deck. A crazy chain of events is the only comprehendable cause at the moment for not one cause on its own (all but God's will) could take this boat down.
All the crew are well trained (as publicized) and have operated the ship during the last summer charter season in the med.

Attached is the last route and position of Yogi before going stealth, it shows an anchorage a day before the incident which a guess was the resting point for the crew that many are viewing as not adequate and I personally see as enough for the job if well planned like any sea trip should be.

Glad the crew is all safe.

May all those at sea have fairwinds and seas to their favor.

Cheers.
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Last edited by AlfredZ; 02-27-2012 at 08:32 PM.. Reason: Changed attachment width!
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Old 02-28-2012, 12:02 AM   #89 (permalink)
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number of crew

for those of us who has doubts that the number of crew was not sufficient to run a 60 meter boat during a delivery cruise; a good example from the commercial world where a 4500 teu ship of 250 meters loa has only 9...

Safmarine receives first of Wafmax trio
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Old 02-28-2012, 06:16 AM   #90 (permalink)
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Hi all,

The 8 crew are part of the regular crew on board, all of whom are french. They were managing a trip from a scheduled drydock service in Turkey towards berth in Greece. According to AIS info, they were running in stealth mode during the time of the incident, the first call was made at 00:30hours (Hellanic coast guard time) and because of the bad weather the rescue attempts were started at 07:30, and the manufacturer was informed during the 7 hours waiting time of the incident, as you might have read from the words of their spokesperson, the bellows broke off but there is a shut-off valve right underneath. Another thing mentioned in the primary reports is that the captain was warned of bad weather (which I don't think would cause such a disaster on its own). Under the waterline of the ship there are two aft holding tanks for the swiming pool located aft on the weather deck. A crazy chain of events is the only comprehendable cause at the moment for not one cause on its own (all but God's will) could take this boat down.
All the crew are well trained (as publicized) and have operated the ship during the last summer charter season in the med.

Attached is the last route and position of Yogi before going stealth, it shows an anchorage a day before the incident which a guess was the resting point for the crew that many are viewing as not adequate and I personally see as enough for the job if well planned like any sea trip should be.

Glad the crew is all safe.

May all those at sea have fairwinds and seas to their favor.

Cheers.
Thank you for the update. As I work in the industry (marketing - non technical) I am getting loads of questions from friends asking how can such a thing happen to a new yacht built to the latest class rules.

All I can say is wait until the the report comes out as I have no idea.

From your posts and some of the comments in the media, the exhaust seems to be the problem. It would be helpful if somebody with knowledge of new yachts and the regulations could explain a sequence of events how this might cause a yacht to sink.

Surely there are:

1) Warning alarms (AMS?) that show tempertaure increase, loss of water flow or water in the engineroom, and back up ways of shutting off inlets automatically or manually.

2) Water tight bulkheads isolating areas such as engineroom so that a boat could not sink, even if the automatic? bilge pumps could not keep up.

3) Auxillary emergency generators outside the engineroom to power bilge pumps

3) I read something about a main door on aft deck opening and letting in water as the boat rolled in the waves, presumbably backing up, again surely the class rules are designed for these loads

Any help in my ignorance greatly appreciated as I do find the sinking alarming for the industry and quite inexplicable for new built boat with all the rules and regulations that the industry has to operate under. Will they need rewriting yet again.
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