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a yacht you can drive yourself?

 
 
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Old 09-04-2007, 12:53 PM   #1 (permalink)
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a yacht you can drive yourself?

Hi everyone,

I've been looking at yachts around the 75-100 foot range. I'm not looking for an expeditionary vessel, nor am I looking for a mobile helicopter platform, but more of a weekend getaway vessel. My house has a dock that can dock a boat up to 110' on the ICW, so that's why I'm looking at this range. I've never owned a boat this large before, but I think it will be fun. The only caveat is, I'd really like to be able to drive the boat by myself sometimes. Obviously, if I was cruising somewhere I'd hire the professionals, but I'd love to be able to just take the boat out for a spin alone, either on the ICW or the ocean (just around the coast). I'm not trying to become a captain, but I'd be willing to take any courses necessary to do this, as this is an important feature for me, as is finding a user-friendly boat. Any advice would be much appreciated.
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Old 09-04-2007, 01:03 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Hi Mets, I hope you are not thinking of going out all alone? This is not a good idea on a 75 feet+ yacht. What you describe is otherwise spot on to this yacht; http://www.lsxquad.com/
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Old 09-04-2007, 09:48 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Thanks AMG. Actually I was thinking of going out alone , but nothing more than a short drive around the block . That being said, I imagine a larger boat will behave differently than the mid size category that I'm use to at the moment, so I won't make any rash decisions.

That boat does indeed look very nice. I'm definitely interested in the flybridge models as well, and I've been checking out what Azimut has to offer (starting with the 85). I like how they have the wood on the fly deck, which the Ferretti's don't seem to have. Is a fly typically harder to drive than the hardtops? Thanks again.
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Old 09-04-2007, 10:36 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Going solo...?

I would stay with 50 or so if I was going out alone on a regular basis.

Too many things could go wrong, and the bigger the boat is, the more "wrong" could happen.

Personally I enjoy smaller boats for buzzing around solo: Less to worry about and easier to maneuver: 25 feet, twin engines, a cooler, a head and a bimini or T-top for shade.

To buzz around solo in a 100' yacht is a bit irresponsible.

Yes, it can be done if you are an experienced captain with all the tools at your fingertips:

1) Intimate knowledge of all the ship's system's.
2) Emergency procedures memorized.
3) Local knowledge of area.
4) Sea-Tow's frequencies and home bases memorized.
5) 100% accurate weather forecast..

That being said, most proffesional Captains would take a mate or deck-hand along even for a short cruise on a big boat.
They know from first hand experience how things can go wrong in a hurry and with that size yacht, money to hire a mate for the day should not a problem.

Not trying to be the party-pooper here Mr. Mets, if money is burning in your pocket, go and buy the biggest toy-boat you can find, but make sure you operate the thing with a bit of responsibilty: Solo ain't it....
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Old 09-05-2007, 02:48 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mets
I've been checking out what Azimut has to offer (starting with the 85).Is a fly typically harder to drive than the hardtops?
Since you can drive from both inside and on the FB it is rather easier, but if you are on the FB in a mooring situation you need to be really fit to be able to run around your yacht. I know a couple (husband and wife) with an AZ 85 that can manage it, but they are very experienced and usually get assistance from shore when mooring.

What Lazzara did not communicate very well on their website is the joystick operation of the four IPS-drives, where you can get your yacht in any direction by pointing the stick. Similar arrangements are also on many waterjet boats, like the Hinckleys http://www.hinckleyyachts.com

Still, driving a yacht of 60 to 120 tonnes all alone is not to recommend, whatever gadgets you have. You can have technical problems, get ropes tangled in your props or simply hit your head when running around and suddenly your yacht is out of control....

Think small or get a deckhand you can trust. And don´t forget that a yacht of 80-100 feet is an almost fulltime maintenance job...
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Old 09-05-2007, 11:55 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Thanks everyone. After reading these posts, I don't think it's a good idea that I try to drive alone. Actually it seems rather stupid now that I think about it There's no need to turn what is supposed to be a fun vacationing vessel into an emergency room.

I was unaware of the joystick drive on the Lazzara. I like both of these boats, so now I'll have to think about which one better suits me. The drivability of the Lazzara is certainly a nice feature. We'll see, and thanks again.
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Old 09-05-2007, 05:41 PM   #7 (permalink)
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A cool owner operated weekend cruiser?
I've seen the new Mulder 54 open in real life yesterday and it's just as cool as the 59 open. have a look at this.
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Old 09-06-2007, 03:58 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I currently own a Fairline Phantom 48 and I use it on my own, but together with a professional deck-hand who also has the knowledge of driving a yacht. There are always minor problems which arise and you need a helping hand. In the last month I've had ropes getting tangled in my shafts three times and you always need someone to jump into the water and get the ropes untangled. These things happen and you can't leave the boat unattended.
I am receiving a new Squadron 78 in a few months and I plan to hire a full time captain who will also maintain the boat. Large boats need a lot of upkeep and maintenance which you alone will not be able to provide. You can always drive the boat on your own even if a captain or a professional deck hand is present on board. They will keep out of the way if that's your wish, but will be there in case of emergency and their help is needed.
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Old 09-06-2007, 09:37 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Good advice Tarek. I didn't even know you had your own ropes dragged in. That's not cool.
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Old 09-06-2007, 10:41 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YachtLuver
Good advice Tarek. I didn't even know you had your own ropes dragged in. That's not cool.
I didn't mean my own ropes, but untied ropes of other yachts just floating around in marina waters.
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Old 09-06-2007, 11:08 AM   #11 (permalink)
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OK, gotcha now.
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Old 09-06-2007, 05:16 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Here in South Florida, insurance companies are getting more and more stringent and will not even offer a quote for an owner operator who has not had a certain amount of experience. They are also concerned about a yacht without a crew when a storm threatens.
An option might be to find a nice yacht in the 60-90 foot range and hire a crew. This makes going for a spin so much more fun as the work is done by the crew, the fun is enjoyed by the owner. The captain then can give you lessons so that you can run the boat yourself, but with him on board to keep the insurance people happy.
Hope this helps!!

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Old 09-07-2007, 08:14 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Mov-It, I had never even heard of Mulder. I checked out their website and I really like how their boats are built for long ranges of travel and with strong hulls. I think the inside leavs a bit to be desired though, but it's built for substance not style.

TK congrats on the 78. I've only heard good things about the Fairlines. I kind of want more of a sundeck on the fly bridge though, and the Fairline's usually use it as a nice outdoor eating place, which is kind of why I didn't look closer. I can see how at least a hired deckhand would be a nice option. I'm definitely going to hire a crew regardless of what I get.

Since drivability is important to me, I actually think I might go for something around half the size (50 feet) instead. As nice as a big boat is, I'd rather be able to just take it out for a spin, and doing this on a larger boat seems like it will take extra work. If I did it alone it would also be unsafe. I'd also rather have less upkeep to deal with.

I can't believe how many boats there are, it can be rather overwhelming...although I'm certainly not complaining
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Old 09-07-2007, 04:40 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Insurance

On anything 75-100 feet I can feel sure that the insurance companies would have issues with you at the helm, alone!!! Especially having no experience.
I used to operate a fleet of yachts, one of which was a 75ft sportfish, on two occasions I took that out alone (well more like move docks) and would absolutely not suggest doing the same.

I think Hinckley T55 could be a good option for you. Gorgeous yachts that have an ingenius joystick control.
http://www.hinckleyyachts.com/
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Old 09-15-2007, 12:54 AM   #15 (permalink)
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I was recently doing more research on 50' fly bridges and I came across a manufacturer called Sealine. Has anybody heard of them? I don't see that they have a subforum here on YF so I'm guessing they're rather small. I really liked the look of the T series though. But how is the quality of these boats compared to Azimut, Ferretti, Fairline, Sunseeker, etc.? I'm assuming there either new or low volume as there doesn't seem to be much on them. I like the look though, have to admit.
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