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a yacht you can drive yourself?

 
 
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Old 09-15-2007, 02:19 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Sealine is owned by Brunswick (as is Sea Ray). I believe they are typically priced under Azimut, Fairline, and Sunseeker.

If this yacht will be kept on this side of the Atlantic, then there are several North American brands with 50ish flybridges to consider. Such as Alden, Marquis, Neptunus, Ocean Alexander, Symbol, and Viking. Although that is fudging a bit, as the Viking is similar to Princess.

Just my humble opinion, but running a 35-40 foot boat your first season would leave you with a lot more confidence for a larger yacht the second year.

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Old 09-15-2007, 03:18 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Here is the Sealine site. http://www.sealine.com/AboutUs_Innovation.aspx

More here. http://www.sealine.com/

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Old 09-19-2007, 12:58 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Thanks very much again. My search still continues.

I recently saw some Lazzara boats and I was wondering, how much crew would be needed for the 68 Sport? The reason why I ask is that there is no designated crew quarters so I want to know how many bedrooms I'll have to sacrifice.

I've also checked out the Azimut 47 which has gotten good reviews on other sights. I probably would have settled with that but I'm not a fan of the interior at all, which consists of brown and dark brown.

Thanks for the help again.
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Old 09-19-2007, 06:14 AM   #19 (permalink)
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size of boat to choose

Dear Mets,

I have been following your thread with interest. I suggest that you initially concentrate on which size of boat you will be happy with. I can see that you are considering several boats and they are in different size brackets. Only then you can decide whether you will need 1, 2 or 3 crew.

Just to make my case clear, I have started with a 40' boat years back and nowadays I am using a boat around 100'. Each time I moved from one bracket to the other in size. Of course opinions may change in the setting of brackets, but my classification is as follows;

40-50 feet - two nice cabins and a good galley
50-65 feet - three nice cabins
65-80 feet - four cabins, 3 separate dining areas
80-100 feet - could be a raised pilot house and 5 cabins, in any case more space and flexibility.

The above is basically valid for flybridge boats. Open boats may need to be considered differently, but I do not have any experience in such boats.

Up to 62 feet you could survive with 1 crew, if you are a good boat handler yourself. My opinion (valid for Med boating), up to 80 feet you will need at least 2 and above that you may need 3 crew.
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Old 09-19-2007, 10:56 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Good to know that nilo. Question: are those crew requirements just for running the yacht? Or do they include galley/housekeeping duties as well?

Kelly
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Old 09-19-2007, 12:02 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Depends on how you run the yacht of course. If it is a family yacht and you do not need silver service and you're not entertaining business and do not charter, then I believe these will be good enough for galley/housekeeping and running the yacht.

To be more precise,

2 crew will mean that you will have a captain who also understands from the mechanical issues and a deckhand who can cook and serve and clean the interiors. Captain will be cleaning the exterior.

If you have 3 crew, again the captain will have a good understanding of mechanical issues and will assist in cleaning the exterior. There should be a chef/stewardess and a deckhand who would be cleaning the exterior and assist for interior and services.

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Originally Posted by KCook
Good to know that nilo. Question: are those crew requirements just for running the yacht? Or do they include galley/housekeeping duties as well?



Kelly
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Old 09-19-2007, 02:48 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Thank you for clearing that up nilo
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Old 09-20-2007, 12:47 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Ah thank you nilo that was excellent advice. I'll be the first to admit that I have been jumping all over the place, and I think it is because my expectations were unrealistic. If you recall I originally wanted a 100' that I could take out alone (which seems ridiculous to me now).

May I ask how many boats you have had? I'm thinking that it would be best to start in the 40' - 50' range now that so that I can get my feet wet, and then depending on how that goes I can upgrade later as I want.
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Old 09-20-2007, 05:34 AM   #24 (permalink)
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I have owned 5 boats so far. I still keep 2 of them.

I started with a 40' second hand planning boat to understand my needs and not to loose too much if my decision for boating was not suiting to the family. Then we moved to a 53' and further on to a 68', also planning boats. Presently I have a 95' boat with a semi displacement hull made of aluminum and also a cold molded wooden 51' lobsterboat style boat.

I have always driven my boats, but for maintenance and service I have employed crew all along the way.

The upside of having permanent crew, aside from the service issue, was that there was less down time with the boats and furthermore I did not face difficulties when time was on to sell them.
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Old 09-20-2007, 09:13 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Mets,

I just moved up from a Fairline Targa 52 to a Ferretti 681.

Running a larger FB type vessel solo is not a smart move. The docking logistics and maintenance alone should discourage you.

That said, the 52 was a terrific boat with many features and potentially (read: operator skill set) a single hander.

The insurance co's will certainly give you grief and you may end up in Lloyds of London with a huge premium and big deductible.

I hired a FT capt for the 681 and enjoy operating the vessel with a competent hand on board. Besides, at times its nice to sit back and enjoy a cocktail without the task of piloting.

Best o'luck and enjoy the shopping.

Triple Treasures
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Old 07-27-2008, 04:07 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mets
I was recently doing more research on 50' fly bridges and I came across a manufacturer called Sealine. Has anybody heard of them? I don't see that they have a subforum here on YF so I'm guessing they're rather small. I really liked the look of the T series though. But how is the quality of these boats compared to Azimut, Ferretti, Fairline, Sunseeker, etc.? I'm assuming there either new or low volume as there doesn't seem to be much on them. I like the look though, have to admit.

The Sealine is a UK built boat. Nice styling and a well built boat.
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Old 07-28-2008, 01:38 AM   #27 (permalink)
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sealine

Yes Sealine do make a pretty good boat. They manage to make very good use of space on all the boats they design.
Their reputation is good in the UK although their quality of workmanship back in their earlier days seemed to get a bit of a beating. In reality they are very good at what they are meant to do, and that is fun on the water. I personally prefer the lines and slightly more over engineer'd Sunseekers but you are also talking a big difference in price.
If you find one and the price is right I would certainly say buy one.
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Old 08-12-2008, 07:14 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Sealine

Sealine is based in the U.K. and owned by Brunswick (Mercury, Hatteras and many more). No small builder as I have heard.
The marina at the Mariott in Miami used to be Global Yachts a few years back and the main importer. A google search should help shed some new light.
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Old 08-12-2008, 08:30 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Used to captain a T-47. Very low bow/ wet ride at bridge helm. Otherwise comfortable and fancy. Like the Fairline it has a useless crewquarters that's just a waste of space. DK who sells or services them which could be a big problem
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Old 08-12-2008, 09:50 PM   #30 (permalink)
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excluding insurance requirement or emergencies, layout is far more critical to single handling operation than size. A pilot house styled boat make it very easy to single hand a boat regardless of size since you are within a few steps of your spring lines. A flybridge boat on the other hand, is a little more difficult to single hand (unless it has a set of control aft) since you have to come down the stairs and then go forward to get to your spring.

I routinely single hand my 53 (and other Hatt. MYs) without any issues, these boats are incredibly easy to handle. Largest boat I've single hand to date is a 70 footer skylounge with controls on the aft deck. no big deal.

that said, there is more to operating a larger boat than just docking her... for instance, systems knowledge is critical.
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